Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences

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CSTPR Noontime Seminar: Tanya Heikkila and Chris Weible

CSTPR Noontime Seminar: Tanya Heikkila and Chris Weible

Mapping the Political Landscape of Hydraulic Fracturing in Colorado

by Tanya Heikkila and Chris Weible, School of Public Affairs, University of Colorado Denver

Abstract: What is the landscape of hydraulic fracturing politics in Colorado?  How does Colorado politics on this issue compare to other states?  To what extent do people view recent regulations as solving problems in Colorado? This presentation explores these questions using recent data collected in Colorado, Texas, and New York.  The findings and conclusions emphasize areas of agreement and disagreement with strategies for moving forward.

Bios: Tanya Heikkila and Chris Weible are associate professors at the School of Public Affairs at the University of Colorado Denver.  They specialize in understanding environmental conflicts and cooperation.

location

CSTPR Conference Room, 1333 Grandview Avenue

Event Type

CSTPR
2014-10-13
 
Analytical Chemistry Seminar: Zachary Finewax and Randall Chiu

Analytical Chemistry Seminar: Zachary Finewax and Randall Chiu

Ozonolysis of a polyunsaturated acid and its primary oxidation products

Zachary Finewax - 1st Year Graduate Student, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

Detection of glyoxal, the smallest α-dicarbonyl, in remote locations over the Pacific Ocean, has prompted research into its sources. Glyoxal is likely produced by oxidation of compounds within the sea surface microlayer. Reactions of linoleic acid, a polyunsaturated fatty acid found in the sea surface microlayer, and its primary gas phase oxidation products yielded glyoxal without an OH scavenger present. In the presence of an OH scavenger, glyoxal production is significantly reduced, and malondialdehyde, the smallest β-dicarbonyl, was detected. These findings elude to a mechanism of glyoxal formation, and a possible explanation of why malondialdehyde has not been detected in the atmosphere.

Pond Scum and Boiling Water: Water Chemistry at Yellowstone National Park

Randall Chiu - 1st Year Graduate Student, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

Since the mid-1990's, the Nordstrom lab at the US Geological Survey National Research Program (USGS NRP) has sampled numerous hot springs and rivers in Yellowstone National Park (YNP). The data, collected at least annually, provide a unique record of the inorganic chemistry (including major cations and anions, trace metals, and unusual species such as polythionates) of the geothermal waters at YNP. The data are used by collaborators at various universities to supplement microbiology research and also by USGS researchers investigating the geochemistry of YNP. This talk will summarize some of the current research efforts at YNP, with emphasis on USGS work that has public health and safety implications.

Jointly sponsored by the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, CIRES, and the Environmental Program

location

CIRES Fellows Room, Ekeley S274 - 1665 Central Campus Mall, Boulder, CO 80309
2014-10-13