Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences

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CSTPR Noontime Seminar: Jordan Kincaid

CSTPR Noontime Seminar: Jordan Kincaid

Fracking In Denton, Texas: Who Benefits and Why Was it Banned?

by Jordan Kincaid, Center for Science and Technology Policy Research and Environmental Studies, CU Boulder

Abstract: Located in North Texas, the City of Denton has ~275 active gas wells and over a decade of SGD.  Here we use an environmental justice framework to analyze the distribution of the costs and benefits of SGD within Denton.  Using data on mineral property values from 2002-2013 and gas well location data, we ask: who owns Denton’s mineral rights (i.e. the greatest financial beneficiaries of drilling) and how does this pattern of ownership relate to who lives near gas wells (i.e. those who shoulder the nuisances and health impacts of SGD)?  Our results show that Denton’s mineral wealth is widely distributed around the United States, residents own 1% of the total value extracted, and the city government is one of the largest financial beneficiaries of drilling.  In addition to distributional inequities, our analysis demonstrates that split estate doctrine, legal deference to mineral owners, and the uniqueness of SGD in urban centers create disparities in municipal SGD decision-making procedures. The environmental justice issues associated with fracking in Denton also provide an explanation for the November 2014 vote to ban fracking in the city.

Biography: Jordan M. Kincaid, M.S., is a Ph.D. student in the Environmental Studies Program focusing on environmental ethics and policy. His research focuses on questions of justice pertaining to shale gas development, climate change adaptation, and material resource consumption.

location

CSTPR Conference Room, 1333 Grandview Avenue

resources

Event Type

CSTPR
2015-04-06
 
Analytical Chemistry Seminar: Facundo M. Fernández

Analytical Chemistry Seminar: Facundo M. Fernández

Jointly sponsored by the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, CIRES, and the Environmental Program

Forensics, Metabolomics and Molecular Imaging by Mass Spectrometry

Facundo M. Fernández - Professor, School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology

Mass Spectrometry (MS) is one of the key analytical methods used to identify and characterize small quantities of biological molecules embedded in complex matrices.  Although MS has found widespread use, technical improvements in its instrumentation are needed to extend its application to the grand challenges that face the environmental, chemical and biomedical sciences. In this talk I will present insights into new approaches for generating ions under atmospheric pressure in an “open air” format followed by mass spectrometric detection.  That research has enabled our group to perform a series of experiments in the fields of forensics, imaging and metabolomics.   I will describe how “open air” MS has helped us detect the components in and track the sources of counterfeit drugs in developing countries, perform high throughput metabolic fingerprinting of patients with cancer, and image a variety of surfaces. I will also describe more fundamental work involving finite element simulations and Schlieren imaging of ion transport processes at the atmospheric pressure interface of the mass spectrometer. Finally, I will describe new results where plasma ion sources are used for better coupling of LC to MS.

location

CIRES Fellows Room, Ekeley S274
2015-04-06