Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences

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Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Butterflies and polar bears: understanding Arctic sea ice predictability

by Dr. Ed Blanchard-Wrigglesworth

Interest in forecasts of Arctic sea ice has grown in recent years as a result of growing socio-economic activity in the region and impacts on the local population, and as a science-motivated effort to test our understanding and ability to predict ongoing changes in the Arctic. In this talk, we shall review the physical processes that give rise to Arctic sea-ice predictability and its season-and-scale dependency, and the tools that are used to quantify the limits of predictability. We shall also explore the skill and limitations of current forecasting systems and discuss future paths for progress in the field

date

Monday, February 27, 2017
3:30pm to 4:30pm

location

RL-2 (on East Campus) room 155
2017-02-27
 
Analytical Chemistry Seminar

Analytical Chemistry Seminar

Analytical & Environmental Chemistry Division and Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Jointly sponsored by the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, CIRES, and the Environmental Program

Cannabidiol-dependent modulation of cognitive learning and synaptic function

by Prof. Jeff Smith

The National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Drug Abuse, currently lists Cannabidiol as having potential therapeutic value for treating neurological disorders that include a strong learning and memory component including; anxiety, psychosis, pain, and substance use disorders. It is also being studied for its potential to modulate various neurodegenerative disorders that profoundly affect learning and memory including Alzheimer’s disease. Despite this potential therapeutic importance, the current scientific understanding of exactly how Cannabidiol affects various forms of learning and memory, and the underlying cellular mechanisms that it targets, is inadequate to guide its most efficacious and least harmful use for treating such disorders. Our research advances knowledge in this area by showing that Cannabidiol modulates trace fear conditioning in mice. These experiments model cognitive learning and memory processes and involve multiple brain regions, including the hippocampus, which has a critical role in the learning and memory disorders listed above, and it is essential for achieving normal trace fear conditioning in rodents. Our work further shows that Cannabidiol modulates basal synaptic transmission in mouse hippocampal slices by affecting conduction velocity in the Shaffer collateral and Mossy Fiber pathways, and by modulating synaptic plasticity in these regions. Impulse propagation and synaptic plasticity are essential fundamental mechanisms that support learning and memory, therefore our results present a clearer picture of how Cannabidiol might be most useful, and least harmful for treating neurological disorders that have a strong cognitive learning and memory component.

date

Monday, February 27, 2017
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

CIRES Fellows Room, Ekeley S274
2017-02-27