Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences



Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
28
29
30
1
2
3
4
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
 
Analytical Chemistry Seminar: Steven Brown and Aroob Abdelhamid

Analytical Chemistry Seminar: Steven Brown and Aroob Abdelhamid

Nitrogen Oxides and Aerosols (NOAA): Some applications of cavity enhance spectroscopy in atmospheric chemistry

Steven S. Brown - Chemical Sciences Division, NOAA Earth System Research Lab
, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado

Nitrogen oxides (NOx) are emitted from both anthropogenic and natural processes and critically influence the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere.  Aerosols arise from a variety of sources and impact climate through their radiative effects and atmospheric chemistry through heterogeneous and multiphase reactions. Nitrogen oxides in particular undergo distinct heterogeneous reactions that link gas and aerosol phase chemistry. Both nitrogen oxides and aerosols are amenable to measurement by new, high sensitivity optical techniques known as cavity enhanced spectroscopy. I will survey some recent efforts and future projects toward development of this instrumentation, as well as several applications, including nighttime chemistry, wintertime photochemistry and aerosol optical properties.

Isoprene hydroxynitrates and isoprene carbonylnitrates: kinetics and mechanisms

Aroob Abdelhamid - 1st Year Grad Student, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

Aroob Abdelhamid is a first year graduate student who completed her undergraduate degree at California State University, Fresno. She researched under Dr. Alam Hasson for approximately 3 years. One of the projects she worked on while there involved studying the reactions of isoprene hydroxy nitrate and its cousin isoprene carbonyl nitrate, products formed by oxidation of isoprene under high NOx. In her talk, Aroob will discuss the importance of these compounds as well as kinetic and mechanistic results she and the Hasson group obtained.

Jointly sponsored by the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, CIRES, and the Environmental Program

location

ESOC Reading Room, Ekeley W230 - 1665 Central Campus Mall, Boulder, CO 80309
2014-10-06
 
CSTPR Noontime Seminar: Leslie Dodson and Drew Zachary

CSTPR Noontime Seminar: Leslie Dodson and Drew Zachary

Red Cross/Red Crescent Climate Centre Internship Program Summer 2014 panel discussion

by Leslie Dodson, ATLAS Institute, College of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Colorado Boulder and Drew Zachary, Anthropology, University of Colorado Boulder

location

CSTPR Conference Room, 1333 Grandview Avenue

resources

Event Type

CSTPR
2014-10-06
 
 
 
Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar: Alex Crawford

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar: Alex Crawford

Alex Crawford - Graduate student, Geography, NSIDC/CIRES

A New Look at the Summer Arctic Frontal Zone

A notable characteristic of the summertime Arctic is the existence of a narrow band of strong horizontal temperature gradients spanning the coastlines of Siberia, Alaska, and western Canada that extends through a considerable depth of the troposphere.  This summer Arctic Frontal Zone (AFZ) is best expressed in July.  It is manifested aloft as a separate Arctic jet feature at about 300 hPa. It is clearly associated with differential atmospheric heating, as evidenced by the sharp difference in surface energy balance terms between the Arctic Ocean and land. Interannual variations in monthly strength of the summer AFZ are spatially heterogeneous and primarily dependent on local variability in cloud cover, surface wind direction, snow cover extent, and sea ice concentration. Throughout the period 1979 to 2012, monthly June AFZ strength increased throughout most of Eurasia, which is likely related to amplification of Arctic atmospheric warming over land by snow cover loss.

location

RL-2 Room 155 - 1540 30th Street, Boulder, CO 80309
2014-10-09
 
Reading the IPCC Report: Ch. 6 - Carbon and other Biogeochemical Cycles by Pieter Tans

Reading the IPCC Report: Ch. 6 - Carbon and other Biogeochemical Cycles by Pieter Tans

Ever wonder what the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report says? This fall's focus is on Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis (Working Group I's contribution to the IPCC 5th Assessment Report)

This is a CIRES-ATOC Seminar Series

For more information please visit: http://cires.colorado.edu/news-events/announcements/new-seminar-series-cires-and-atoc-reading-ipcc-report/

location

CIRES Auditorium - 1665 Central Campus Mall, Boulder, CO 80309
2014-10-09
 
Distinguished Lecture Series: Dr. Thomas H. Jordan

Distinguished Lecture Series: Dr. Thomas H. Jordan

The Prediction Problems of Earthquake System Science

Watch the webcast

System science seeks to explain phenomena that emerge from nature at the system scale, such as global climate change or earthquake activity in California or Alaska. The 'system' is not a physical reality, but a hypothetical representation of nature, typically a numerical model or ensemble of models that replicates an emergent behavior and predicts its future course. In this presentation, Professor Jordan will describe how system-level models of fault rupture and seismic wave propagation are improving our understanding of earthquake predictability by posing interesting problems of contingent predictability as physics questions in a system-specific context. As an example, he will show how more accurate earthquake simulations using realistic three-dimensional crustal models can reduce the aleatory variance of the strong-motion predictions by a factor of two relative to the empirical ground motion prediction equations in current use, which would lower exceedance probabilities at high hazard levels by an order of magnitude. He will also discuss the new capabilities for operational earthquake forecasting that are being developed in several countries, including the Italy, New Zealand, and the United States.

date

Friday, October 10, 2014

location

CIRES Auditorium - Boulder, CO

resources

Event Type

DLS
2014-10-10
 
 
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
 
Analytical Chemistry Seminar: Zachary Finewax and Randall Chiu

Analytical Chemistry Seminar: Zachary Finewax and Randall Chiu

Ozonolysis of a polyunsaturated acid and its primary oxidation products

Zachary Finewax - 1st Year Graduate Student, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

Detection of glyoxal, the smallest α-dicarbonyl, in remote locations over the Pacific Ocean, has prompted research into its sources. Glyoxal is likely produced by oxidation of compounds within the sea surface microlayer. Reactions of linoleic acid, a polyunsaturated fatty acid found in the sea surface microlayer, and its primary gas phase oxidation products yielded glyoxal without an OH scavenger present. In the presence of an OH scavenger, glyoxal production is significantly reduced, and malondialdehyde, the smallest β-dicarbonyl, was detected. These findings elude to a mechanism of glyoxal formation, and a possible explanation of why malondialdehyde has not been detected in the atmosphere.

Pond Scum and Boiling Water: Water Chemistry at Yellowstone National Park

Randall Chiu - 1st Year Graduate Student, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

Since the mid-1990's, the Nordstrom lab at the US Geological Survey National Research Program (USGS NRP) has sampled numerous hot springs and rivers in Yellowstone National Park (YNP). The data, collected at least annually, provide a unique record of the inorganic chemistry (including major cations and anions, trace metals, and unusual species such as polythionates) of the geothermal waters at YNP. The data are used by collaborators at various universities to supplement microbiology research and also by USGS researchers investigating the geochemistry of YNP. This talk will summarize some of the current research efforts at YNP, with emphasis on USGS work that has public health and safety implications.

Jointly sponsored by the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, CIRES, and the Environmental Program

location

CIRES Fellows Room, Ekeley S274 - 1665 Central Campus Mall, Boulder, CO 80309
2014-10-13
 
CSTPR Noontime Seminar: Tanya Heikkila and Chris Weible

CSTPR Noontime Seminar: Tanya Heikkila and Chris Weible

Mapping the Political Landscape of Hydraulic Fracturing in Colorado

by Tanya Heikkila and Chris Weible, School of Public Affairs, University of Colorado Denver

Abstract: What is the landscape of hydraulic fracturing politics in Colorado?  How does Colorado politics on this issue compare to other states?  To what extent do people view recent regulations as solving problems in Colorado? This presentation explores these questions using recent data collected in Colorado, Texas, and New York.  The findings and conclusions emphasize areas of agreement and disagreement with strategies for moving forward.

Bios: Tanya Heikkila and Chris Weible are associate professors at the School of Public Affairs at the University of Colorado Denver.  They specialize in understanding environmental conflicts and cooperation.

location

CSTPR Conference Room, 1333 Grandview Avenue

Event Type

CSTPR
2014-10-13
 
Reading the IPCC Report: Ch. 7 - Clouds and Aerosols by Dave Randall

Reading the IPCC Report: Ch. 7 - Clouds and Aerosols by Dave Randall

Ever wonder what the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report says? This fall's focus is on Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis (Working Group I's contribution to the IPCC 5th Assessment Report)

This is a CIRES-ATOC Seminar Series

For more information please visit: http://cires.colorado.edu/news-events/announcements/new-seminar-series-cires-and-atoc-reading-ipcc-report/

location

CIRES Auditorium - 1665 Central Campus Mall, Boulder, CO 80309
2014-10-14
 
 
 
 
 
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
 
CMC Minutes Oct. 20, 2014

CMC Minutes Oct. 20, 2014

CMC Meeting  10/20/2014

 

Members present: Doug Fowler, Gloria Hicks, Robin Strelow, Rick Tisinai, Barry Eakins, Kiki Holl, Ben Livneh, Lucia Harrop, Christopher Clack

 

Administrative Topics:

Doug reviewed the by-laws re: elections for officers; Doug read through the duties.

Election: Rick is Chair (no other candidate); Robin is Vice Chair; Amanda Morgan might be secretary.  We will find out next month. Officers serve for 1 year.

 

Doug & others who met with Waleed plus Rick & Robin need to meet with Kristen (?). She is planning to meet with Barry in his office on Thursday.

 

Lucia – who is outgoing? Kiki, David, Joe, Deann, Doug, Gloria. Possible that GSD can’t find a replacement, but Ben has someone lined up to replace him. That person might replace Joe instead.   

 

Barry – we can start looking ahead for the various committees for Rendezvous and any other committees we might need.

 

Questions for Paula  -  Kristen told Lucia that Paula might not attend the CMC meeting next month.

 

[[missing notes due to system crash]]

 

Barry -  would the meeting with Kristen take the place of Paula meeting with us?

Rick – We should still develop a question or two for either Kristen or Paula.  Anne P. sent an email that basically states that she would like CIRES to gather data similar to the CSD and ESRL data reflected in the attached graphs, so that CIRES could make a determination as to any possible inequities at CIRES based on gender.

 

One troubling statistic is that 40% of the employees leaving CIRES are women, but women only make up 25% of the CSD work force.

 

Lucia – could this have some relation with the number of women scientists entering the work force over time?

 

Rick – Yes, and they are taking that into consideration.  Are biggest question is can CIRES management get the information they need to make an assessment as to possible inequities. 

 

Lucie – CU does not track gender (perhaps due to legalities and hiring practices).  This question might not be answerable.

 

Deann – I think there must be a way to do this legally

 

Lucia – CIRES doesn’t have much sat as to pay and promotions in CSD.  You might be able to get to the data, but CIRES can’t do anything about disparities.

 

Barry – where does the responsibility lie? What we (CMC) can do is advocate – hold CIRES accountable for looking at the data on a regular basis and addressing any issues they find.  We can ask if these practices skew based on gender.  We are looking for fairness in the hiring/promoting/firing processes.

 

Rick – Someone (the two Anne’s) is trying to determine if there is a problem based on data from one lab.

 

[There was a related discussion re: recommendations on the ASA and Career Track process and how it relates to this issue]

 

date

Monday, October 20, 2014
12:00pm
2014-10-20
 
Reading the IPCC Report: Ch. 8 - Anthropogenic and Natural Forcing by J.F. Lamarque

Reading the IPCC Report: Ch. 8 - Anthropogenic and Natural Forcing by J.F. Lamarque

Ever wonder what the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report says? This fall's focus is on Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis (Working Group I's contribution to the IPCC 5th Assessment Report)

This is a CIRES-ATOC Seminar Series

For more information please visit: http://cires.colorado.edu/news-events/announcements/new-seminar-series-cires-and-atoc-reading-ipcc-report/

location

CIRES Auditorium - 1665 Central Campus Mall, Boulder, CO 80309
2014-10-21
 
CSTPR Noontime Seminar: Heather Bailey

CSTPR Noontime Seminar: Heather Bailey

The Argument for Changing the Electric Utility Business Model

by Heather Bailey, Energy Strategy and Electric Utility Development, City of Boulder

location

CSTPR Conference Room, 1333 Grandview Avenue

Event Type

CSTPR
2014-10-22
 
Behind the Scenes with the Science on a Sphere

Behind the Scenes with the Science on a Sphere

Art x Science: What happens in that potentially powerful intersection of art and science?

Can the two disciplines inform and inspire each other to help people experience global change personally, and inspire them to act in response to the most important issues facing humanity?

Learn about one Science/Arts experiment with NOAA's illuminated Science On a Sphere® display system, during a public event at Fiske Planetarium Wednesday, Oct. 22, at 5:30 pm. CIRES helped fund the  research. More: www.sos.noaa.gov/Experiment

location

Fiske Planetarium - 2414 Regent Drive, Boulder, CO 80309
2014-10-22
 
 
 
 
26
27
28
29
30
31
1
 
Analytical Chemistry Seminar: Miriam Freedman

Analytical Chemistry Seminar: Miriam Freedman

The Structure of Atmospheric Particles & Impacts on Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate

Miriam Freedman - Penn State University

The interactions of aerosol particles with light and clouds are determined in part by the structure of atmospheric particles, which is the focus of research in my laboratory.  My talk will focus on molecular-level studies of surfaces relevant for cirrus (ice) cloud formation and the phase separation behavior of submicron aerosol particles composed of organic and inorganic components. Through these projects, I will demonstrate the importance of characterizing aerosol structure in determining aerosol physical and chemical properties relevant to atmospheric chemistry and climate.

location

CIRES Fellows Room, Ekeley S274 - 1665 Central Campus Mall, Boulder, CO 80309
2014-10-27
 
CSTPR Noontime Seminar: Jessica Weinkle

CSTPR Noontime Seminar: Jessica Weinkle

Is This (Our) Risk? The Science and Politics of Catastrophe Insurance

by Jessica Weinkle, Center for Science and Technology Policy Research, CU Boulder

Free and open to the public

Abstract: The title of this presentation implies two issues:  Is this risk? Is this our risk?  The answers are not straightforward.  These questions form a basis for my research and serve to guide the narrative of this presentation.  The presentation subtitle, 'The science and politics of catastrophe insurance,' describe the processes by which society comes to answer the two questions in the context of natural hazards.  Yet, often the process of negotiating agreement about risk for the purpose of insurance is veiled by technical jargon, appeal to expert knowledge, and issue conflation.  This muddies trade-offs facing the public and policymakers when they seek effective decision making for improved management of society's risk and public insurance programs.  This presentation aims to accomplish three tasks: 1) Illustrate my research activities for the past several years at CSTPR and ICAT; 2) Present current issues I am working on at the interface of risk, insurance, and public policy; and 3) Place ongoing and future research into a broad social, financial and democratic context. 

Biography: In 2013, Jessica earned her doctorate in environmental studies from the University of Colorado Boulder.  For the past year, she has worked as a postdoc at the CSTPR and in partnership with ICAT, a private catastrophe insurance company in Boulder.  Her research focuses on the interface of risk, insurance and public policy with a particular emphasis in the construction and use of hurricane catastrophe models.

In January she will begin work as an assistant professor at the University of North Carolina Wilmington in the department of Public and International Affairs.

Jessica also holds a Master of Arts in Climate and Society from Columbia University and a Bachelor of Science in Zoology from the University of Texas at Austin.

location

CSTPR Conference Room, 1333 Grandview Avenue

Event Type

CSTPR
2014-10-27
 
Reading the IPCC Report: Ch. 12 - Long Term Climate Change by John Fasullo

Reading the IPCC Report: Ch. 12 - Long Term Climate Change by John Fasullo

Ever wonder what the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report says? This fall's focus is on Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis (Working Group I's contribution to the IPCC 5th Assessment Report)

This is a CIRES-ATOC Seminar Series

For more information please visit: http://cires.colorado.edu/news-events/announcements/new-seminar-series-cires-and-atoc-reading-ipcc-report/

location

CIRES Auditorium - 1665 Central Campus Mall, Boulder, CO 80309
2014-10-28