Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences



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Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar: Kevin Schaefer

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar: Kevin Schaefer

Using Interferometric Synthetic Apaerature Radar (InSAR) to Remotely Sense Active Layer Thickness in Permafrost Regions

by Dr. Kevin Schaefer - Research Scientist, NSIDC/CIRES

Active layer thickness (ALT) is a critical parameter for monitoring the status of permafrost, typically measured at specific locations using probing, in situ temperature sensors, or other ground-based observations. The Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring (CALM) network has conducted ALT measurements over the past two decades, but is under-populated and sparse. Here we describe the Remotely Sensed Active Layer Thickness (ReSALT) product to remotely sense active layer thickness. We use the Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) technique to 1) measure long-term subsidence trends resulting from the melting and subsequent drainage of excess ground ice in permafrost, and 2) measure seasonal subsidence resulting from the expansion of soil water into ice as the active layer freezes and thaws. We estimate ALT from the seasonal subsidence assuming a vertical profile of water within the soil column and identify individual thermokarst features as spatial anomalies in the subsidence trends. We present 100x100 km2, 100 m resolution ReSALT products for several sites on the North Slope of Alaska: Prudhoe Bay, Barrow, Toolik Lake, Happy Valley, and the Anaktuvik fire zone. We validated ReSALT using in situ measurements of ALT from CALM and Ground Penetrating Radar. ReSALT has proven effective in measuring local variations in ALT and thermokarst activity on the North Slope of Alaska with broader potential applications across the permafrost regions of North America and Eurasia.

location

RL-2 (on East Campus) room 155
2015-09-02
 
Reading the IPCC Report: Ben Livneh

Reading the IPCC Report: Ben Livneh

Freshwater by Ben Livneh

IPCC WG II: Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability 

ATOC/CIRES Seminar Series

Ever wonder what the IPCC report says? Attend the ATOC/CIRES Seminar Series Reading the IPCC Report and hear experts in the IPCC chapter areas explain how climate change may impact us, and how it might be mitigated.

location

CIRES Auditorium

contact

Ben Livneh

2015-09-03
 
 
 
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Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar: Matthew Hoffman

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar: Matthew Hoffman

Validation of the Dynamic Response of Ice Sheet Models to Changes in Outlet Glacier Discharge

by Dr. Matthew Hoffman - Scientist, Climate, Ocean, & Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory

Although ice sheet models are used for sea level rise projections, the degree to which these models have been validated by observations is fairly limited, due in part to the limited duration of the satellite observation era and the long adjustment time scales of ice sheets. Here we describe a validation framework for the Greenland Ice Sheet applied to the Community Ice Sheet Model by forcing the model annually with flux anomalies at the major outlet glaciers (observed from Landsat/ASTER/OIB) and surface mass balance (calculated from RACMO2) for the period 1991-2012. The ice sheet model output is compared to ice surface elevation observations from ICESat and ice sheet mass observations from GRACE. While this testbed is still in development, early results show promise for assessing the performance of different model configurations.

location

RL-2 (on East Campus) room 155
2015-09-09
 
Reading the IPCC Report: Joanie Kleypas

Reading the IPCC Report: Joanie Kleypas

Ocean Systems by Joanie Kleypas

IPCC WG II: Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability 

ATOC/CIRES Seminar Series

Ever wonder what the IPCC report says? Attend the ATOC/CIRES Seminar Series Reading the IPCC Report and hear experts in the IPCC chapter areas explain how climate change may impact us, and how it might be mitigated.

location

CIRES Auditorium
2015-09-10
 
 
 
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Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar: Joseph A. MacGregor

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar: Joseph A. MacGregor

A Synthesis of the Thermal State of the Bed of the Greenland Ice Sheet

By Joseph A. MacGregor, Ph.D. - Research Associate, Institute for Geophysics, The University of Texas at Austin

The present thermal state of an ice sheet’s bed (frozen or thawed) is an important control upon its history, present dynamics and future vulnerability to climate change. However, this thermal state can only be observed directly within sparse boreholes or simply inferred from the presence of subglacial lakes. In this talk, I'll synthesize new and existing spatially extensive inferences of the thermal state of the bed of the Greenland Ice Sheet to better constrain this state, identify poorly constrained regions and inform ice-flow modeling. New remote sensing inferences are derived from this ice sheet’s deep radiostratigraphy, MODIS surface imagery and InSAR surface velocity. Existing inferences include outputs from multiple thermomechanical ice-flow models. I evaluate their agreement and present a ice-sheet-wide mask that synthesizes our current understanding of the thermal state of bed of the Greenland Ice Sheet.

location

RL-2 (on East Campus) room 155
2015-09-16
 
Reading the IPCC Report: James Syvitski

Reading the IPCC Report: James Syvitski

Coastal Systems by James Syvitski

IPCC WG II: Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability 

ATOC/CIRES Seminar Series

Ever wonder what the IPCC report says? Attend the ATOC/CIRES Seminar Series Reading the IPCC Report and hear experts in the IPCC chapter areas explain how climate change may impact us, and how it might be mitigated.

location

CIRES Auditorium
2015-09-17
 
 
 
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Analytical Chemistry Seminar: Paul Ziemann and Jose Jimenez

Analytical Chemistry Seminar: Paul Ziemann and Jose Jimenez

Analytical & Environmental Chemistry Division and Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Jointly sponsored by the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, CIRES, and the Environmental Program

Chemistry of Organic Compounds in the Atmosphere and Indoor Air
Paul Ziemann - Professor, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry & CIRES Fellow, University of Colorado Boulder

Laboratory studies provide much of the fundamental data on reaction kinetics, products, and mechanisms that are needed to achieve a deep understanding of atmospheric and indoor air chemistry and to develop detailed and accurate models that are used to establish air quality regulations and to predict the effects of human activities. Research in my laboratory focuses primarily on the atmospheric chemistry of organic compounds emitted from natural and anthropogenic sources and the physical and chemical processes by which oxidized organic reaction products form microscopic aerosol particles. Studies are conducted in large-volume environmental chambers where experiments are designed to simulate but simplify atmospheric chemistry and conditions in order to obtain information on gas and particle chemical composition, reaction rates and equilibria, and particle properties. Obtaining such data is a challenge, but in this talk I will describe how we approach this problem by using a diverse array of measurement techniques. I will also discuss our more recent studies on the chemistry of indoor air.

Title and Abstract Forthcoming

Jose Jimenez - Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry & CIRES Fellow, University of Colorado Boulder

 

location

CIRES Fellows Room, Ekeley S274

contact

2015-09-21
 
 
 
Reading the IPCC Report: Linda Mearns

Reading the IPCC Report: Linda Mearns

Regional Context by Linda Mearns

IPCC WG II: Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability 

ATOC/CIRES Seminar Series

Ever wonder what the IPCC report says? Attend the ATOC/CIRES Seminar Series Reading the IPCC Report and hear experts in the IPCC chapter areas explain how climate change may impact us, and how it might be mitigated.

location

CIRES Auditorium
2015-09-24
 
Distinguished Lecture Series: Dr. David Keith

Distinguished Lecture Series: Dr. David Keith

Moderate, Temporary, and Responsive Solar Geoengineering 

Abstract: The combination of inertia and uncertainty makes the coupled climate-economic system dangerously hard to control. If the climate's sensitivity is at the high end of current estimates it may be too late to avert dramatic consequences for human societies and natural ecosystems even if we could quickly cut emissions to zero. Emissions cuts are necessary to manage climate risks, but they are not necessarily sufficient. Prudence demands that we study methods that offer the hope of limiting the environmental risks posed by the accumulation of fossil carbon in the atmosphere. The engineered alteration of the earth's radiation budget-geoengineering-offers a fast means of managing climate risk, but it entails a host of new risks and it cannot fully compensate for the risk posed by carbon in the air. I will review the science and technology and of solar geoengineering and argue that systematic management of climate risks entails the capability to implement these technologies. Finally, I will speculate about the elements of a geoengineering research program needed to build and regulate such capability.

Bio: David Keith has worked near the interface between climate science, energy technology, and public policy for twenty five years. He took first prize in Canada's national physics prize exam, won MIT's prize for excellence in experimental physics, and was one of TIME magazine's Heroes of the Environment. Best known for work on solar geoengineering, David’s analytical work has ranged from the climatic impacts of large-scale wind power to an early critique of the prospects for hydrogen fuel. David has built a high-accuracy infrared spectrometer for NASA's ER-2 and developed new methods for reservoir engineering increase the safety of stored CO2. David is Professor of Applied Physics in the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and Professor of Public Policy in the Harvard Kennedy School, he spends about a third of his time in Calgary, where he helps lead Carbon Engineering a company developing technology to capture of CO2 from ambient air.

date

Friday, September 25, 2015
4:00pm to 5:00pm

location

CIRES Auditorium

resources

Event Type

DLS

Amenities

Refreshments provided

2015-09-25
 
 
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CSTPR Seminar: Jan Marco Müller

CSTPR Seminar: Jan Marco Müller

Chief Scientific Adviser in the European Commission: Results of an Experiment

by Dr. Jan Marco Müller - Policy Officer for International Relations, European Commission's Joint Research Centre

Drawing on his experience as office manager of the European Commission's first Chief Scientific Adviser Professor Dame Anne Glover, Dr Jan Marco Mueller will present why and how the role of Chief Scientific Adviser to the President was implemented in the European Commission, how it was perceived both internally and externally and which factors led to the dismantling of the role after only 3 years of existence. The talk will present achievements and failures as well as lessons to be learnt for science advisory structures.

Biography: Jan Marco Müller, a German citizen born in 1971, served 2012-2014 as Assistant to Professor Anne Glover, the then Chief Scientific Adviser to the President of the European Commission. In February 2015 he joined the European Commission's Joint Research Centre in Brussels as a Policy Officer for International Relations. Jan Marco Müller joined CSTPR as a sabbatical visitor from August-December 2015.

Following his studies of Geography, Media Sciences and Spanish, he received a PhD in Geography from the University of Marburg (Germany) with a thesis about the impact of market liberalisation on the transport system of Colombia, funded with a grant from the German Friedrich Naumann Foundation.

From 2000-2004 he served as Assistant to the Scientific Director of the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) in Leipzig (Germany). During this time he was instrumental in the foundation of the Partnership for European Environmental Research (PEER), the network of Europe's largest environmental research centres, to which he served as Secretary in the first three years.
 
In 2004 he joined the European Commission as Research Programme and Communications Manager of the Institute for Environment and Sustainability in Ispra (Italy), which is one of the seven Institutes constituting the European Commission's Joint Research Centre (JRC), the European Commission's in-house science service.

In 2007 he left the Commission to work as Head of Business Development & Public Relations at the Headquarters of the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH) in Wallingford (Oxfordshire), which as part of the Natural Environment Research Council in the UK's centre of excellence for integrated research in terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems and their interaction with the atmosphere.

In 2009 he returned to the Commission, serving until January 2012 as Assistant to the Director-General of the Joint Research Centre, based at the JRC Headquarters in Brussels. Following a brief stay in the Interinstitutional Relations Unit of DG Research and Innovation, he joined the former Bureau of European Policy Advisers (BEPA) in March 2012 to support the recently appointed Chief Scientific Adviser in her tasks, before returning to the JRC in 2015.
 
Jan Marco Müller has fulfilled many scientific assignments, including having served four years on the Scientific and Technical Advisory Board of the French national environmental research centre IRSTEA (formerly known as CEMAGREF) and as an Assistant Professor for Urban Geography at the National University of Colombia in Bogotá. Since May 2012 he is a Policy Fellow of the Centre for Science and Policy (CSaP) of the University of Cambridge.

location

CSTPR Conference Room, 1333 Grandview Avenue

Event Type

CSTPR
2015-09-29
 
Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar: Ted Scambos

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar: Ted Scambos

The Coldest Place on Earth

Dr. Ted Scambos - NSIDC/CIRES, University of Colorado Boulder

location

RL-2 (on East Campus) room 155
2015-09-30