Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences



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Reading the IPCC Report: Leiwen Jiang

Reading the IPCC Report: Leiwen Jiang

Human Settlements by Leiwen Jiang

IPCC WG II: Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability 

ATOC/CIRES Seminar Series

Ever wonder what the IPCC report says? Attend the ATOC/CIRES Seminar Series Reading the IPCC Report and hear experts in the IPCC chapter areas explain how climate change may impact us, and how it might be mitigated. 

location

CIRES Auditorium
2015-10-01
 
Performance, Art and Music for a Resilient Boulder

Performance, Art and Music for a Resilient Boulder

Performance, Art and Music for a
RESILIENT BOULDER

Open to all ages, Free admission

This evening is brought to you as an expression of creative climate communication by Inside the Greenhouse, the Albert A. Bartlett Center for Climate Communication, the Environmental Center, the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, the CU student group Performers Without Borders, Casey Middle School Muse Studio and the School for the Environment and Sustainability and in cooperation with the City of Boulder, BoCoStrong, Climate Culture Collaborative, National Center for Atmospheric Research, ISET-International, Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, and the Rockefeller Foundation’s 100 Resilient Cities Initiative, which includes our very own City of Boulder.

PERFORMANCE
Sol-Her Energ-He is an original musical performed by Boulder youth that (1) weaves together a lively story of energy, humans and climate and (2) jump starts our community in authoring ideas for city planning for resilience. This professionally produced performance serves as an envelope for new narratives based on local issues towards a resilient future.

Created by Beth Osnes | Music by Tom Wasinger | Choreography by Arthur Fredrick

ART
Young Women's Resilient Voices is an art exhibit by Boulder youth expressing what resilience means to them through kites, capes and mixed media, on exhibit at SEEC opening October 2. In addition, community members will be invited to interact with ceramic prayer wheels and share what resilience means to them. Follow #ResilienceMeans on Twitter to see how the conversation is evolving from voices around the world. 

MUSIC
Lastly, dance the night away to Bateria Alegria, live Samba band on the outdoor deck bedazzled with Solar-powered lights, refreshments, good conversation and much fun for all ages.

location

Sustainability, Energy and Environment Complex (SEEC)

resources

Event Type

CSTPR
2015-10-02
 
 
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Analytical Chemistry Seminar: Veronica Vaida and Eleanor Browne

Analytical Chemistry Seminar: Veronica Vaida and Eleanor Browne

Analytical & Environmental Chemistry Division and Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Jointly sponsored by the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, CIRES, and the Environmental Program

Building molecular complexity with sunlight at aqueous interfaces

by Veronica Vaida - Professor, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry & CIRES Fellow, University of Colorado Boulder

High energy, low entropy solar radiation can be used to initiate radical reactions leading to organic polymers and oligomers in environmental systems. In atmospheric chemistry, the role of the photochemically generated OH radical is well studied. However, the role of other radicals, especially those generated from organic precursors, is less well-understood. This presentation will discuss examples of photochemically-initiated organic radical reactions at the water surface. Specifically, the photochemistry of oxoacids, such as pyruvic acid as well as a series of oxoacids with longer aliphatic side chains, will be discussed. Photochemical processing occurs with solar simulators under both aerobic and anaerobic environments, characteristic of the contemporary and ancient Earth’s atmosphere, respectively. The polymers produced are investigated by mass spectrometry and NMR, while the supramolecular aggregates that spontaneously self-assemble during photolysis are monitored by microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Implications of these abiotic processes to atmospheric and environmental chemistry will be discussed, specifically as they affect aerosol nucleation and growth.

Atmospheric Reduced Nitrogen: Trends and Future Directions

by Eleanor Browne - Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry & CIRES Fellow, University of Colorado Boulder

Organic nitrogen is a ubiquitous atmospheric component typically accounting for between one-quarter and one-third of reactive nitrogen deposition, however, its chemical complexity and its reactivity has made it challenging to study. Consequently, little is known about the atmospheric processing of organic nitrogen and the resulting implications for biogeochemistry, air quality, and climate. Organic nitrogen can be broadly separated into two groups: oxidized organic nitrogen compounds such as acyl peroxy nitrates and reduced organic nitrogen compounds such as amines. Historically, our knowledge of the chemistry of reduced organic nitrogen has lagged behind that of oxidized organic nitrogen due to the dominance of oxidized nitrogen sources. Recent enactment of air quality regulations in the United States and parts of Europe, however, has resulted in decreased emissions of oxidized nitrogen while emissions of reduced nitrogen have remained constant or have increased due to expansion of agriculture and increased use of fertilizer. Thus, it is timely to study the chemistry of reduced organic nitrogen. I will discuss trends in emissions of reduced nitrogen, its implications for reduced organic nitrogen, and future studies on the chemistry of reduced organic nitrogen. 

location

CIRES Fellows Room, Ekeley S274
2015-10-05
 
 
Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar: Katja Friedrich

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar: Katja Friedrich

The Great Colorado Flood of September 2013

by Dr. Katja Friedrich - Dept. of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University of Colorado Boulder

During the second week of September 2013 a seasonally-uncharacteristic weather pattern stalled over the Rocky Mountain Front Range region of northern Colorado bringing with it copious amounts of moisture from the Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean Sea, and the tropical Eastern Pacific Ocean. This feed of moisture was funneled towards the east facing mountain slopes by a series of mesoscale circulation features resulting in several days of unusually widespread heavy rainfall over steep mountainous terrain. Radar and disdrometer observations collected during the event are used to diagnose the spatial and vertical structure of clouds and precipitation during episodes of intense rainfall. The analysis focuses on 30 hours of intense rainfall in the vicinity of Boulder, CO during 2200-0400 UTC on 11-13 September. The strongest rainfall occurred along lower parts of the Colorado Front Range at >1.6 km MSL and on the northern side of the Palmer Divide. Vertical structure of clouds and horizontal distribution of rainfall are strongly linked to upslope flow and low-level forcing, which resulted in surface convergence. Particular focus is placed on documenting how circulation features, embedded within the larger synoptic flow, served to funnel moist inflow into the mountain front driving several days of sustained orographic precipitation. The performance of several quantitative precipitation estimates, quantitative precipitation forecasts, and hydrological forecast products are also analyzed with the intention of identifying what monitoring and prediction tools worked and where further improvements are needed.

location

RL-2 (on East Campus) room 155
2015-10-07
 
LASP Public Lecture: Craig Rodger

LASP Public Lecture: Craig Rodger

Zombie Satellites, Killer Electrons, and Physics in Space!

by Craig Rodger, University of Otago

The strange but true tales of AARDDVARK – Radio research in the Antarctic and Arctic

The space around the Earth is filled with fast moving particles trapped in two “belts” by our magnetic field. The belts were named the “Van Allen radiation belts” in 1958 in honor of their discoverer, James Van Allen.

Earth-orbiting satellites can be damaged or even lost due to increased high-energy electron fluxes in the Earth’s radiation belts. Craig Rodger from New Zealand studies how these high energy particles are lost into the polar atmosphere using the AARDDVARK network located in the Arctic and Antarctic.

location

LASP Space Technology Building Room 299, 1234 Innovation Dr
2015-10-07
 
Reading the IPCC Report: Brian O’Neill

Reading the IPCC Report: Brian O’Neill

Emergent Risks and Key Vulnerabilities by Brian O’Neill

IPCC WG II: Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability 

ATOC/CIRES Seminar Series

Ever wonder what the IPCC report says? Attend the ATOC/CIRES Seminar Series Reading the IPCC Report and hear experts in the IPCC chapter areas explain how climate change may impact us, and how it might be mitigated.

location

CIRES Auditorium
2015-10-08
 
Distinguished Lecture Series: Jan Marco Müller

Distinguished Lecture Series: Jan Marco Müller

The quest for evidence: An insider's view on science and politics in Europe 

Abstract: The disappearing of the Chief Scientific Advisor post in the European Commission in November 2014 has put the role of science in European policy-making into the spotlight. While the Commission in the frame of its better regulation agenda is setting up a new science advisory mechanism based on a high-level expert panel and input provided by national science academies, discussions about the future role of the Commission's in-house science service, the Joint Research Centre (JRC), and other evidence providers such as the EU Agencies have also gained a new dynamic. Based on his experience as Assistant to the former Chief Scientific Advisor Professor Dame Anne Glover, the lecturer will put the ongoing debate around institutional structures into the wider context of the complexity of European policy-making and the role given to science in political decisions, including on controversial topics such as GMOs.

Bio: German Jan Marco Müller, a policy officer for international relations in the European Commission's Joint Research Centre (JRC) in Brussels, is currently a visiting sabbatical fellow at CIRES. He served from 2012-2014 as Assistant to Professor Dame Anne Glover, then the Chief Scientific Adviser to the President of the European Commission. Müller's research background is in geography; since earning his Ph.D. from the University of Marburg (Germany), he has worked in several prominent environmental research centers including the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research(UFZ) in Leipzig (Germany), the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology(CEH) in Wallingford (Oxfordshire), and the Institute for Environment and Sustainability in Ispra (Italy), which is one of the seven Institutes constituting the JRC, the European Commission's in-house science service. Müller helped found the Partnership for European Environmental Research(PEER), the network of Europe's largest environmental research centres, to which he served as Secretary in the first three years.

location

CIRES Auditorium

Event Type

DLS

Amenities

Refreshments provided

2015-10-09
 
 
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Analytical Chemistry Seminar: Henning Finkenzeller and Rainer Volkamer

Analytical Chemistry Seminar: Henning Finkenzeller and Rainer Volkamer

Jointly sponsored by the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, CIRES, and the Environmental Program

CE-DOAS at its Detection Limit

by Henning Finkenzeller - 1st Year Graduate Student, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado Boulder

Cavity Enhanced Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CE-DOAS) is an established method for the in-situ measurement of trace gas concentrations. Its detection limit is often not determined by noise but systematical effects.

I comment on the combined effect of high frequency intensity variations and the non-linearity of the spectrometer in intensity space on the detection limit, which is estimated from model calculations.
I also present the new calibration method ICOM (Integrated Calibration by means of Optical Modulation) for the determination of light path lengths in optical resonators, which is promising because of its high performance concerning spectral resolution, absolute accuracy and precision.. 

Title and Abstract Forthcoming

by Rainer Volkamer - Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry & CIRES Fellow, University of Colorado Boulder

location

CIRES Fellows Room, Ekeley S274

contact

2015-10-12
 
 
 
Reading the IPCC Report: Paul Chinowsky

Reading the IPCC Report: Paul Chinowsky

Key Economic Sectors and Services by Paul Chinowsky

IPCC WG II: Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability 

ATOC/CIRES Seminar Series\

Ever wonder what the IPCC report says? Attend the ATOC/CIRES Seminar Series Reading the IPCC Report and hear experts in the IPCC chapter areas explain how climate change may impact us, and how it might be mitigated.

location

CIRES Auditorium
2015-10-15
 
Happy 50th, NGDC/NCEI

Happy 50th, NGDC/NCEI

The NOAA National Geophysical Data Center (now National Centers for Environmental Information) is celebrating 50 years serving as a national archive for geophysical information. Please join them in an Open House Friday morning, October 16, in the David Skaggs Research Center, room GC402 and the Outreach Classroom. Coffee and light refreshments will be served. The event starts with some brief remarks at 8:30 am from Drs. Eric Kihn, Sandy MacDonald, Waleed Abdalati and Rick Spinrad. After that, wander around several interactive exhibits to learn more about NGDC's data services, science and legacy.

location

David Skaggs Research Center, room GC402 and the Outreach Classroom

Amenities

Refreshments provided

2015-10-16
 
 
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Analytical Chemistry Seminar: John Birks

Analytical Chemistry Seminar: John Birks

Analytical & Environmental Chemistry Division and Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Jointly sponsored by the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, CIRES, and the Environmental Program

Portable Air Pollution Monitors and the Global Ozone (GO3) Project

by John Birks - President, 2B Technologies and Director, Global Ozone (GO3) Project, Boulder, CO

Over the past 15 years we have developed highly portable instruments for measurements of ozone, NO, NO2 and black carbon. These instruments have enabled measurements in remote locations and extreme environments around the world. Our small, light-weight, low-power instruments have been widely used for atmospheric measurements on balloons, kites, UAVs, towers, trams and research aircraft, and at many remote sites, including Antarctica, the Galapagos Islands, the Greenland ice sheet, the summit of Mont Blanc, the Amazon rain forest, on buoys in the Arctic Ocean, on commercial airliners, in many U.S. National Parks and at numerous other locations throughout the world.

The Global Ozone or “GO3” Project was founded as a non-profit organization for educational outreach in 2009. In the GO3 Project, middle and high school students at more than 100 schools around the world measure air pollutants and meteorological parameters outside their schools and upload their data to a public database every 15 minutes. The data may be graphed online and displayed on Google Earth. Students interpret their results and discuss their findings in blogs and forums in a social network similar to Facebook. The GO3 Project includes an online, interactive curriculum where students learn about atmospheric environmental problems and how they are interrelated, including: ground level ozone, stratospheric ozone depletion ("ozone hole"), acid rain and global climate change. The GO3 Project also includes a hands-on Black Carbon Experiment where students measure this important air pollutant by collecting particles on a filter and measuring the optical transmission through the filter using a simple but accurate photometer. In our newest project, GO3 Treks, students hypothesize how air pollutants vary along treks of their own design, and then carry out the treks using pocket-sized ozone and black carbon monitors. Treks are displayed on Google Earth within blogs where students discuss their results with input from teachers and air quality scientists.

location

CIRES Fellows Room, Ekeley S274

contact

2015-10-19
 
NCAR Climate & Global Dynamics Seminar: Kris Karnauskas

NCAR Climate & Global Dynamics Seminar: Kris Karnauskas

Climate Change on Tropical Islands: Dynamics and Impacts

by Kristopher B. Karnauskas - Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences & Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University of Colorado Boulder

Tropical islands are home to some of the most vulnerable human and natural systems on Earth. For example, coral reefs are susceptible to ocean warming, penguins (on the Galapagos) depend on a marine food web fueled by upwelling, and remote human civilizations are particularly sensitive to freshwater resources. Our ability to connect large-scale dynamics to such local impacts is fundamentally limited by model resolution and sparse observations. In this synthesis talk, I will present my latest research aimed at leveraging in situ measurements, satellite observations, and global climate model simulations toward mechanistic and quantitative projections of anthropogenically forced changes in tropical climate and their likely impacts on marine ecosystems and remote human populations.

location

NCAR, Mesa Lab, Main Seminar Room - 1850 Table Mesa Drive
2015-10-20
 
Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar: Karl Rittger

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar: Karl Rittger

Mapping snow and snow melt with MODIS, Landsat and other satellites for the CHARIS project

by Dr. Karl Rittger  - NSIDC/CIRES, University of Colorado Boulder

location

RL-2 (on East Campus) room 155
2015-10-21
 
FOSEP Talk

FOSEP Talk

The challenge of shaping a society that embraces innovation ­- and why Europe differs from the US

by Jan Marco Müller

 

location

CIRES Fellows Room, Ekeley S274

Amenities

Lunch provided

2015-10-21
 
CMC Meeting Oct. 21, 2015

CMC Meeting Oct. 21, 2015

CMC Meeting Minutes

October 21, 2015

 

CMC Meeting Budget Changes

Recent P-card audit has incited CIRES to reduce budget for food at CMC meetings to $1000 annually, which is approximately $86 per month. This is not enough to keep up the current system of hosting meetings at the Egg & I 12 times per year.

 

Three alternatives were proposed and can be iterated upon:

Reduce meetings to 8 per year. Already none in May for Rendezvous (RDV). Discontinue meetings in June, July, and August.
Hold meetings in the CIRES Fellows room and have it catered to some extent Won’t likely be well-attended by outside people traveling from DSRC.
Move meetings to each of the labs on a rotating basis. Catering to some extent maybe? Would encourage residents to attend more often, at least every three or so months. Potential security hassle.

 

As an aside to this discussion, Waleed has promised a Town Hall meeting for East Campus in the near future.

 

New Members

Two new representatives showed up today. Carrie Morrill to replace Barry and Craig Hartsough to replace Pallavi in GSD.

 

Safety

CIRES has published new guidelines for safety procedures for CIRES staff at DSRC after CMC recently brought up the problem.

 

Elections

A big thanks to Barry for his service in the recent years to CMC. You will be missed!

 

Voting procedures led to the filling of the offices in the following manner:

 

CMC Chairperson: Christina Holt
CMC Vice Chairperson: Anne
CMC Secretary: Rick Tisinai
RDV Chair: Amanda
OPA Chair: Chris Clack
Membership Chair: Chance
Fellows & Executive Committee Representatives

Chris Clack, Primary
Anne, Primary
Carrie Morrill, Alternative

Bi-Law Committee

Craig Hartsough
Rick Tisinai
Lucia Harrop

OPA Committee

None explicitly declared. Follow up with Michelle Cash by Stone. Maybe Robin?

CMC Web Site Liaison: Lucia Harrop
RDV Web Site Liaison:  Amy Steiker
Poster Submission Liaison: Allen Pope
Day-of Coordinator: Amanda will also handle

 

 

To clarify a few roles:

The Vice Chair is responsible for holding meetings in the Chair’s absence and helping out with the meetings when needed, meeting with Kristen Averyt monthly.
The Fellows & Exec Committee Reps attend 2 meetings per month. On the first Thursdays, the Executive Committee meeting where CMC has a seat and a voice. On the Second Thursdays, the Fellows meeting, where we take a listening only role. It’s kind of important to keep consistency as much as possible.
Bi-Laws to be considered are at minimum Lucia’s role/position in CMC, and Membership Chair Addition.

 

 

Bikes at NSIDC

The recent staff change in the message center at NSIDC resulted in a review of procedures for the CIRES bikes there. Inconsistent messages about whether waivers are required for everybody are floating around. Lucia will follow up with the issue.

 

After the recent service of the bikes, two bikes were swapped between NSIDC and NOAA.

 

Discussion concerning the addition of E-cycles station at NOAA reiterated that there is not enough usage of the bikes to really necessitate anything further. CIRES employees on campus have access to the Buff Bikes.

 

CIRES Training

Lucia sets up several trainings at NOAA throughout the year to provide information about CIRES procedures related to items such as promotion, ASA, supervisor roles, etc. She would like to have more CMC representation at these meetings so that we are more aware of the policies. She also would like to see such trainings added at the other centers outside NOAA.

 

date

Wednesday, October 21, 2015
12:00pm
2015-10-21
 
Climate Change and Colorado Water

Climate Change and Colorado Water

Louisville Climate Change Symposium

by Jeff Lukas, Western Water Assessment

As part of an on-going public education initiative, the City of Louisville Open Space Division and Open Space Advisory Board recognize that Climate Change is an issue that has potential to affect us all at global to local scales. The Louisville Climate Change Symposium is an initiative led by the Open Space Advisory Board to reach out  to our Louisville, Boulder County and Colorado community to provide cutting edge information about the science of climate change and potential impacts to Colorado and the Front Range.  This three-part series will feature topics ranging from the current state of climate science to predicted effects on Colorado water and Front Range vegetation.

Come explore what climate change means to Louisville and the world we live in.

Tickets are free, but space is limited and you must have a ticket to attend. Tickets will be available one month prior to each event online. - See more at: http://cires.colorado.edu/news/events/events/climate-change-and-colorado-water/#sthash.G8vOVs45.dpuf

location

Louisville Middle School - 1341 Main St, Louisville, CO 80027
2015-10-22
 
Reading the IPCC Report: William Travis

Reading the IPCC Report: William Travis

Food Security by William Travis

IPCC WG III Mitigation

ATOC/CIRES Seminar Series

Ever wonder what the IPCC report says? Attend the ATOC/CIRES Seminar Series Reading the IPCC Report and hear experts in the IPCC chapter areas explain how climate change may impact us, and how it might be mitigated.

location

CIRES Auditorium
2015-10-22
 
WWA & NOAA PSD El Niño Panel Discussion and Webinar

WWA & NOAA PSD El Niño Panel Discussion and Webinar

What does the current strong El Niño event mean for this coming snowpack and runoff season in Colorado? WWA and the NOAA ESRL Physical Science Division (PSD) are convening a panel of experts to discuss what El Niño is and what it does, past El Niño impacts across Colorado, and what kind of weather we might expect this fall, winter and spring. After an overview of a 2-page briefing document to be released the same day, the panelists will make brief remarks, followed by questions from the audience.

PANELISTS

Jeff Lukas
Western Water Assessment, CIRES, University of Colorado

Klaus Wolter
Western Water Assessment and NOAA Physical Sciences Division

Nezette Rydell
NOAA National Weather Service

Martin Hoerling
NOAA Physical Sciences Division

location

CIRES Auditorium
2015-10-23
 
 
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Analytical Chemistry Seminar: Harald Stark and Doug Day

Analytical Chemistry Seminar: Harald Stark and Doug Day

Analytical & Environmental Chemistry Division and Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Jointly sponsored by the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, CIRES, and the Environmental Program

High-resolution mass spectrometry: peak fitting and aerosol partitioning

by Harald Stark - Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado Boulder

When measuring oxidized organic molecules in the atmosphere, often thousands of compounds can be present and provide a challenge for conclusive assignment in high-resolution mass spectra, particularly when the goal is to retrieve data series over long time periods of weeks or months, as typical in field campaigns. We have developed algorithms to identify and assign peaks in complex mass spectra to produce reliable peak lists for analyzing large data sets. Simulation of mass spectra confirmed the validity of the assignment algorithms for calculation of bulk chemical properties such as carbon number and carbon oxidation state. A new method of deriving such chemical properties without the need for any peak assignment will also be presented.
Application of a peak list from the new algorithms to measurements from a chemical-ionization mass spectrometer deployed in a Pine forest in Colorado allowed measurement of gas-particle partitioning of hundreds of organic compounds. Comparing two methods of deriving saturation concentration distributions (“volatility basis sets”) from the same dataset highlights the importance of fragmentation in thermal desorption techniques..

Particle Size Resolution of the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

by Doug Day - Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado Boulder

Real-time determination of chemically-resolved particles size distributions and their evolution in laboratory and ambient studies can be used to investigate changing source contributions, growth rates, secondary aerosol yields, cloud condensation nuclei potential and other physicochemical processes. The Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometers (AMSs) provides fast size and chemical composition measurements of particles from ~50 nanometers to ~1 micrometer. This work addresses the resolution of the size measurement via particle time-of-flight (PToF) in this instrument. An algebraic model is used to estimate size resolution for different configurations of the instrument as well as particle diameters and vaporization rates. Under typical AMS configurations, for a given particle size, resolution is primarily controlled by the uncertainties in particle time-of-flight due to the finite opening time of the particle gating chopper and particle vaporization. The model was tested with a range of chopper gate widths, particle sizes, and particle compositions, and agreements and disagreements are investigated. The methodology to estimate the size resolution can be applied to all instruments that use particle time-of-flight to infer particle size. Instrument and data acquisition configurations can be optimized for a range of different particle sampling conditions including ambient sampling under low or high loadings, for aircraft platforms, for laboratory applications where loadings may be controllable or narrow particle size ranges are present, and when single-particle chemical or light-scattering detection is possible.

location

CIRES Fellows Room, Ekeley S274
2015-10-26
 
INSTAAR Seminar: Policy - Should it be based on fact or fiction?

INSTAAR Seminar: Policy - Should it be based on fact or fiction?

Joint Research Centre European Commission

by Dr. Jan Marco Mueller

While policies both in the US and Europe are committed to be evidence-based, in practice political decisions are often not based on sound science. This is because science is just one element in the policy-making process, which follows also social, economic, and ethical / religious considerations to name just a few. The lecture analyses the relationship between science and policy and gives recommendations on how to enhance the impact of science on policy-making.

location

INSTAAR 1560 30th Street, Boulder Room 620, ARC Building, East Campus
2015-10-26
 
 
Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar: Matthew Druckenmiller

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar: Matthew Druckenmiller

Communicating why sea ice matters: New directions for the Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH)

by Dr. Matthew Druckenmiller - NSIDC/CIRES, University of Colorado Boulder

The Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH) aims to develop scientific knowledge to help society understand and respond to the rapidly changing Arctic. The SEARCH Sea Ice Action Team (SIAT) has prioritized and recently developed a strategy for science communication targeted toward decision-makers, the media, and other scientists. This talk will discuss new and ongoing efforts of the SIAT to communicate why sea ice and the impacts of its loss matter to a range of societally relevant topics (e.g, ecosystems, lower latitude weather, and coastal communities), and, in the process, to provide a new way of organizing and synthesizing scientific and stakeholder information.

location

RL-2 (on East Campus) room 155
2015-10-28
 
Reading the IPCC Report: Garvin Heath

Reading the IPCC Report: Garvin Heath

Energy Systems by Garvin Heath

IPCC WG III Mitigation

ATOC/CIRES Seminar Series

Ever wonder what the IPCC report says? Attend the ATOC/CIRES Seminar Series Reading the IPCC Report and hear experts in the IPCC chapter areas explain how climate change may impact us, and how it might be mitigated.

location

CIRES Auditorium
2015-10-29