Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences



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EU Discussion Series at CSTPR

EU Discussion Series at CSTPR

The EU Discussion Series at CSTPR
Wednesdays 12:00-1:00 PM

Augusto González, Adviser at the Directorate General for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs, will deliver a series of 8 seminars on EU, ranging from fundamental institutional aspects to current EU priorities

Session 3: October 5
The EU Ordinary Legislative Procedure
   
Lecturer: Augusto González – European Commission

This next seminar will be available via live webcast. To view the live webcast please go to Adobe Connect and login as a guest.

date

Wednesday, October 5, 2016
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

CSTPR Conference Room, 1333 Grandview Avenue

Event Type

CSTPR
2016-10-05
 
 
 
 
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CSTPR Noontime Seminar

CSTPR Noontime Seminar

EU Space Policy
by Augusto González, European Commission

Augusto González will make an overall presentation on the EU competence in space emerging from the EU Treaties, space governance in Europe, current trends in space policy, the EU earth observation and satellite navigation programmes, Copernicus and Galileo, and space-related R&D.

Biography: Augusto González holds the degree of Licenciado in Geography and History from Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain) as well as a Master’s degree in International Studies from University of Salford (United Kingdom).

He joined the European Commission in 1989 and has worked in several policy areas including education and vocational training, space and research. His experience encompasses EU policy and law-making, international relations as well as human resources, financial and programme management.

He held management positions for over 11 years and is currently Adviser to the Director for EU Satellite Navigation Programmes in the Directorate-General for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs).

date

Wednesday, October 12, 2016
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

CSTPR Conference Room, 1333 Grandview Avenue

resources

Event Type

CSTPR
2016-10-12
 
CGA Grant Writing Workshop with Prof. Maggie Tolbert

CGA Grant Writing Workshop with Prof. Maggie Tolbert

Professor Maggie Tolbert, CIRES Fellow, will lead a workshop on grant writing. Please feel free to bring applications you've already written to receive feedback on, or just come to listen. 

If you plan on applying for a CIRES fellowship or travel award, we highly recommend attendance at this workshop. 

date

Wednesday, October 12, 2016
3:00pm to 4:15pm

location

CIRES Auditorium

Event Type

CGA

Amenities

Refreshments provided

2016-10-12
 
Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

A new era for NSIDC's gridded passive microwave data: Using image reconstruction to enhance spatial resolution of the satellite passive microwave historical record

by Mary Jo Brodzik

Currently available global gridded passive microwave data sets serve a diverse community of hundreds of data users, but do not meet many requirements of modern ESDRs or CDRs, most notably in the areas of intersensor calibration and consistent processing methods. The original gridding techniques were relatively primitive and were produced on 25 km grids using the original EASE-Grid definition that is not easily accommodated in modern software packages. Further, since the first Level 3 data sets were produced, the Level 2 passive microwave data on which they were based have been reprocessed as Fundamental CDRs (FCDRs) with improved calibration and documentation.  We are funded by NASA MEaSUREs to reprocess the historical gridded data sets as EASE-Grid 2.0 Earth System Data Records (ESDRs), using the most mature available Level 2 satellite passive microwave (SMMR, SSM/I-SSMIS, AMSR-E) records from 1978 to the present.  We have worked with our Early Adopter user community, who have reviewed and provided feedback on 18 months of prototype data from SSM/I and AMSR-E.  The prototype data set includes grids derived from the two candidate image reconstruction techniques we have compared: 1) Backus-Gilbert (BG) interpolation and 2) a radiometer version of  Scatterometer Image Reconstruction (rSIR).

For our final processing, we are producing coarse-resolution (25 km) averaged TB grids, and enhanced-resolution rSIR grids at resolutions up to 3 km (actual resolution enhancement depends on channel).  Data are gridded to the EASE-Grid 2.0 definition and formatted as netCDF-CF files, which allows users to extract compliant geotiff images, and provides for easy importing and correct reprojection interoperability in many standard packages, including IDL, ENVI, gdal, Panoply and Arc* tools.  As a consistently-processed, high-quality satellite passive microwave ESDR, we expect this data set to supercede at least 4 of NSIDC's standard EASE-Grid passive microwave products: the SSM/I-SSMIS EASE-Grid TB products (nsidc-0032), the enhanced-resolution SSM/I and AMSR-E data (nsidc-0464), the SMMR Pathfinder (nsidc-0071) and AMSR-E gridded TB products (nsidc-0301).

date

Wednesday, October 12, 2016
11:00am to 12:00pm

location

RL-2 (on East Campus) room 155
2016-10-12
 
 
 
 
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CMC Minutes Oct. 17, 2016

CMC Minutes Oct. 17, 2016

CMC Meeting minutes 10/17/2016

 

In attendance:  Chance Sterling (GMD), Chelsea Thompson (CSD), Patrick Veres (CSD), Mistia Zuckerman (NSIDC), Craig Hartsough (GSD), Carrie Morrill (NCEI), Kathleen Lantz (GMD), Lucia Harrop, Eric Adamson (SWPC), Nate Campbell (CIRES Admin), Amanda Morton (CIRES Outreach), Robin Moser (CSTPR), Rick Tisinai (CSD)

 

Lunch and introductions!

Craig brought two new GSD members to consider joining: Beth Russell, and Eric James

 

The meeting started at 12:15pm

 

By-Laws announcement – The CMC ratified By-Laws were submitted to Waleed, who has suggestions before he approves them, so Rick and Craig will follow through.

 

Supervisor’s Evaluation document – CMC needs to see what was sent, and continue to adjust the document. Kathy requested to see the document. It was available via Google Docs from NOAA, but there is difficulty for some non-NOAA people to access the document.

Nate said that Google docs access is not accessible to non-NOAA CMC members and Lucia said that NOAA to CU is also difficult.

Another test will be sent to unravel the communications situation for everybody.

Nate also announced that CMC members can send a picture to CIRES IT and then get an invitation to connect to that person’s CMC page.

Lucia said that Will Van Dauster at NOAA has an open door policy for photographs.

 

Town Hall Meetings – Rick reported that Kristen Averyt was already aware that Waleed needs to step it up for scheduling his Town Hall meetings, and has been prompting him to get those in place.

Nate suggested having CMC lead the arrangements. Waleed’s scheduling is a common block. The Town Hall Meetings were meant to take on more CIRES questions, rather than take time at Rendezvous. This was decided during the post-Rendezvous meeting, as a result of Rendezvous feedback from CIRES members.

Rick – in addition to Town Hall Meetings, using CIRES IT tools such as Survey Monkey and the Anonymous Feedback Site to gather information from the CIRES members will make the communication between Waleed and CIRES members much better.

Chance - CIRES lists, especially the Divisions need to be updated and distributed. Kathy asked to update the web pages to reflect the new members and affiliations.

 

 

Membership update – Chance

Three new people! We need an updated CMC representative number for each Lab and Division, especially after all these new members. (We need to maintain a 3%-of-lab CIRES membership.)

Chance said he realized that a new component of the Membership Chair is to help the Secretary retain the institutional memory by collecting information from outgoing CMC members.

 

Web site – Chance suggested clearing up the redundancy between the CMC private page and the public page. Nate suggested using the Search feature on the CIRES site to find things.

Lucia asked why the CMC has a public page at all. Nate said that the public page is meant to facilitate changes to both pages. CIRES IT can react better to this set up. For example, a person can be a researcher and CIRES members.

Kathy echoed the concern over the CMC public-facing page. Do CIRES members even go to the public page? Nate said that there is usually a link to the InsideCIRES page. Chance defended the public site as a way for CIRES people, finding the public page with a web search, to get to the InsideCIRES page.

Both Kathy and Lucia said that CIRES members have long been used to going directly to the InsideCIRES site. Nate defended the outward facing page for facilitating changes for now, and it will take another year for the public page to be absorbed. Changes such as member profiles, CMC business, etc. are working well for now.

Rick suggested using part of a meeting to have the CMC look at the pages in question on a projector screen.

 

Elections

• Chair – Chance Sterling was elected

• Vice Chair – Mimi Hughes was elected

• Secretary – Mitzi Zuckerman was elected, but will need to wait until after she has her baby, so Nate will take notes until January when Mitzi will return to work.

Lucia – the Membership Chairperson needs a second person to help with out-of-NOAA members! It is very difficult to tack membership changes in the CMC when not in the NOAA building, since most of CIRES is at NOAA.

Therefore, it was unanimously agreed that there be Membership Co-Chairs.

There will be an adjustment to the By-Laws before finalizing them.

• Craig Hartsough and Nate Campbell - co-chairs

• Rendezvous Chair – Amanda Morton was elected

• OPA Chair - Mimi Hughes was elected (she had served in the past year)

• Exec and Fellows Reps – Carrie Morrill will continue, Kathy Lantz and Robin Moser will join.

Elections were completed.

Rick – A new CMC picture is in the offing!

Craig has “the box” of stuff that has some legacy papers, etc. He will look through it and bring a report at the next meeting.

 

Meeting adjourned at 2:05pm

date

Monday, October 17, 2016
12:00pm
2016-10-17
 
 
CSTPR Noontime Seminar

CSTPR Noontime Seminar

Student Expertise and the Legislative Process
by Jeffrey Zax, University of Colorado Department of Economics
 

Jeffrey Zax is a professor specializing in labor economics, public economics, and urban economics. He has published papers on the effects of residential segregation on black labor market behavior; the effects of unions in the local sector on wages, employment, and expenditures; and the effects of regulation on the rate of unionization. He is currently studying income determination and inequality, incomes, discrimination and fertility in China, comparable worth policies, military marriage subsidies, and small business credit markets.

date

Wednesday, October 19, 2016
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

CSTPR Conference Room, 1333 Grandview Avenue

resources

Event Type

CSTPR
2016-10-19
 
Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

CALIPSO Observations of the Cloud Response to Recent Arctic Sea Ice Loss

by Ariel Morrison, ATOC/CIRES - University of Colorado Boulder

date

Wednesday, October 19, 2016
11:00am to 12:00pm

location

RL-2 (on East Campus) room 155
2016-10-19
 
Engaged Scientist Series Public Lecture

Engaged Scientist Series Public Lecture

Helping scientists effectively communicate environmental health, safety and resiliency issues with the public is the focus of a new series thanks to a network of environmental science outreach staff at CU Boulder.

On Thursday, Oct. 20, Raj Pandya, the director of the Thriving Earth Exchange at the American Geophysical Union, will be visiting CU Boulder to kick off the Engaged Scientist Series, which will include a talk and a workshop to be co-led with Ben Kirshner, the director of CU Engage.

Dr. Pandya’s public lecture will be held from 4 to 5 p.m. at the CIRES Auditorium. It will be followed by a workshop from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. in the CIRES Fellows Room S274 for graduate students on developing strong scientist/community partnerships co-led with Ben Kirshner, faculty director of CU Engage.

The series is hosted by the new Albert A. Bartlett Center for Science Communication, CIRES Education and Outreach, INSTAAR, and Learn More About Climate at the Office for Outreach and Engagement. Other events in the series will focus on community dialogue and engaging with diverse communities.

Please RSVP for the free, public lecture.

To learn more about the graduate student workshop and apply to participate, visit https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/engaged_scientist_workshop

date

Thursday, October 20, 2016
4:00pm to 5:00pm

location

CIRES Auditorium
2016-10-20
 
 
 
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CIRES Special Seminar

CIRES Special Seminar

Are they engaged? The use of skin biosensors to monitor participant attention in formal and informal learning settings

by Dr. Karen McNeal 

Abstract: Practitioners often understand that in order to impact a learner, one must have the attention of the target audience.  However, getting the audiences' attention and keeping it can often be a challenge. Even more challenging is being able to assess whether the implemented activity is actually keeping the audience engaged?  Such teaching and learning challenges have been the focus of many current educational studies and teaching approaches. This study employs the use of skin biosensors in a variety of teaching and learning environments from college classrooms, to museum environments, to public concerts and lectures to understand how people engage with various activities focused about the geosciences and/or global change. In a series of interventions, we used skin biosensors combined with pre-post surveys, interviews, direct observations, and eye-tracking approaches to understand how a range of audiences' engaged with a variety of interventions. The suite of exploratory studies aims to inform how biosensors may be integrated with traditional educational research approaches in order to inform practitioners about their teaching and learning strategies.   

Bio: Dr. Karen McNeal is Associate Professor in Geosciences at Auburn University. She is the first discipline based education researcher at Auburn (of many more to come) in the College of Science and Mathematics. She previously held Associate Professor positions at Mississippi State University and North Carolina State University. Her research focuses on geoscience education and geocognition research including those related to complex earth systems and global change. Her work includes the design and evaluation of a variety of interventions and assessment through measuring understanding, perceptions and engagement of informal and formal audiences.  She employs both qualitative and quantitative research approaches, including the application of eye-tracking and skin biosensors methods.  

date

Tuesday, October 25, 2016
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

CIRES Auditorium
2016-10-25
 
Environmental Program Seminar

Environmental Program Seminar

Genuine Wealth, Native Efforts at Sustainability

by Peter Weiss 

Peter studied art, political science and American studies at Marlboro College and earned a Diploma in Sculpture from the School of the Museum of Fine Art in Boston. However, since 1979 his career has centered around photography. 

In 1982 Peter settled in Santa Fe and traveled and photographed extensively through the Southwest. 

In 1991, Peter joined the staff of Recursos de Santa Fe, a 501c3 non-profit that provided an umbrella for various cultural and art projects in New Mexico, Arizona, and Utah. They began to be asked to lead deep, specialized tours for groups from the Smithsonian and other institutions and he found himself a study leader and lecturer on a wide range of topics, mostly to do with the history of indigenous peoples in the area.

In 1997, Peter was asked to do the same in other parts of the world and began by leading tours to the Orinoco, meeting with the Warao on several trips there. He also began leading tours in the Pacific Northwest and along the Eastern Seaboard, lecturing primarily on pre-Columbian cultures from Nova Scotia to South Carolina.

Soon Peter began leading tours in Europe, North Africa, the Norwegian Arctic, West Africa and Japan. Everywhere he goes he is interested in indigenous communities and in Europe, for example, he has been spending more time with refugee groups and other immigrant communities to better understand their strategies for maintaining their cultures while adapting to new lives in often radically different environments.

Over the years Peter has come to view sustainability as adaptation. And as the world continues to change ever more quickly, adaptation is paramount for survival. Some cultures are thriving and others are becoming lost. His experience has given him a few small insights into what seems to work and what doesn’t.

RSVP to ashley.olson@colorado.edu by Monday October 24th at Noon

date

Wednesday, October 26, 2016
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

Sustainability, Energy & Environment Complex (SEEC) S372A/B

Amenities

Lunch provided

2016-10-26
 
Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Remote sensing of seasonal snow water equivalent: instruments of opportunity, systemic inertia, curiosity-driven science and future prospects

 by Dr. Richard Kelly - Department of Geography and Environmental Management, University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada

The estimation of seasonal snow from space typically can be categorized into three variables of interest: snow presence, snow mass (or snow water equivalent, SWE) and snow wetness. The spectral signatures used to identify snow presence and snow wetness have a high contrast with non-snow surfaces that enable robust mapping of these variables for science and human applications. However, the recovery of satellite observation-based seasonal snow mass, or SWE, has been a more challenging aspiration of the snow remote sensing science community since 1978 when the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) instrument was launched. The objectives of SMMR, along with those of the more recent passive microwave instruments (SSMI, AMSR-E, AMSR2, etc.) typically do not consider SWE as a primary goal. Yet these instruments represent the most significant systems available for global long-term satellite SWE applications. While the signature physics of the microwave emission of snow at the local in situ scale is tractable, passive microwave snow emission signatures at the multi-kilometre satellite observation scales are complex on account of the mixing of spatially and time varying signatures across heterogenous snow-covered landscapes. Consequently, satellite passive microwave observing systems have offered tantalizing opportunities to estimate SWE and have succeeded in providing insights into dynamical snow-covered landscapes in some instances, but in other cases they struggle.  Yet arguably they have also contributed to systemic inertia in instrument science development; SWE is observable so why develop something new? Despite these impediments, the acknowledged value of these instruments of opportunity (the continuous passive microwave record is now 38 years long), and the absence of a dedicated global seasonal snow mission have impelled an increasing body of curiosity-driven and applied research into better understanding snow microphysics and landscape-scale distribution of SWE, and how snow interacts with active and passive visible-infrared and microwave radiation. This presentation provides a Canadian perspective on recent advances in knowledge from observation and modelling experiments in the microwave domain, and how future prospects for the satellite observation-based science can benefit.

date

Wednesday, October 26, 2016
11:00am to 12:00pm

location

RL-2 (on East Campus) room 155
2016-10-26
 
CSTPR Noontime Seminar

CSTPR Noontime Seminar

Collaboration in Energy and Materials Sustainability
by Alan Hurd, Los Alamos National Laboratory

Abstract: While rigorous closed-loop sustainability in the consumption of materials and energy is impossible, we have an obligation to society to stretch our resources to the maximum extent. International collaboration is essential given the uneven distribution of resources, population, and human development.

Modern scientists know innately the importance of international collaboration for cracking a difficult research problem. However society often overlooks the diplomatic and economic value of international collaboration: Not only does collaboration build economies in mutual fashion, it decreases global tension. This concept is often called science diplomacy.

Among many examples where science diplomacy works or should work are critical materials whose supply is at risk, specifically helium of both isotopes and rare earth elements for energy applications. The relationships between geologic abundance, markets, and geopolitics that constrain supply are at least as complex as the physics and chemistry that make critical materials valuable and important. The economic spillover effect—in which collaborating nations both benefit in superlinear proportion than proceeding alone—fortify the argument for collaboration.

Alan Hurd is Deputy Director of the National Security Education Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory where he is in charge of the Lab’s academic collaborations. Recently he was a Franklin Fellow for the Science and Technology Adviser to the Secretary at the U.S. Department of State serving Secretary Clinton and Secretary Kerry.  He has been a Visiting Scholar at the Santa Fe Institute and the Director of the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center at LANSCE.  Prior to Los Alamos, Hurd managed materials research at Sandia National Laboratories and taught physics at Brandeis University.

Hurd is a materials physicist whose interests include complex fluids and science policy in an international context, turning recently to matters of sustainability.  His research has been cited 6000 times and was awarded three research awards by the Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

While at Santa Fe Institute and Los Alamos National Laboratory, he served on the APS-MRS study panel on energy critical elements, which resulted in federal legislation signed by President Obama.  He serves on a current APS-MRS-ACS panel on the helium shortage that expects to publish in 2016.

Hurd is active in the scientific societies and non-profit organizations.  Currently he serves as the APS Chair of the Committee on International Scientific Affairs and as a member of the Development Committee.  He is Chair of the MRS Editorial Board of a new review journal on energy and sustainability and Chair of the MRS New Publication Products Subcommittee.  He is Vice Chair for ScienceCounts, a non-profit involved in science education and awareness for the public. For the MRS, Hurd has served in every elected office.  He was the 2007 President of the Materials Research Society, who honored him with the 1999 Woody Award and the 2004 MRS Special Recognition Award.

date

Wednesday, October 26, 2016
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

CSTPR Conference Room, 1333 Grandview Avenue

resources

Event Type

CSTPR
2016-10-26
 
 
 
 
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Analytical Chemistry Seminar

Analytical Chemistry Seminar

Analytical & Environmental Chemistry Division and Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Jointly sponsored by the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, CIRES, and the Environmental Program

Cell Membrane Conditions on C-Reactive Protein Binding

by Mitchell Alton, First Year Graduate Student - Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado Boulder

C-reactive protein (CRP) is an important human protein involved in identification of apoptotic (dying) cells and acts as a general marker of inflammation. CRP functions by binding to the lipid, phosphatidylcholine (PC), which is present in all cells. However CRP does not bind to normal, healthy cells. It is theorized that CRP has different binding affinities for healthy versus dying cells due to differences in membrane curvatures and the presence of oxidized lipids in dying cells. Additionally, CRP has two different conformations that affect binding affinities. I will discuss how these conditions affect the binding of CRP to membranes.

Measurements of Peroxy Radical Loss Rates on Laboratory Surfaces

by Benjamin Deming, First Year Graduate Student - Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado Boulder

Peroxy radicals are important intermediates in the oxidative processing of volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere. Numerous instruments to measure atmospheric concentrations of these short-lived species are in active development. Wall losses of these compounds should be considered when designing such an instrument due to losses within the inlet. In this work, an ECHAMP peroxy radical detector was used to determine the wall-loss rates of HO 2 , CH 3 O 2 , C 2 H 5 O 2 , and isoprene peroxy radicals on PFA Teflon, quartz, halocarbon wax, and other materials. In addition to concentration and relative humidity dependencies, the use of FEP vs PFA Teflon was investigated. 

date

Monday, October 31, 2016
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

CIRES Fellows Room, Ekeley S274

Amenities

Lunch provided

2016-10-31