Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences



March 2017

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Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

The Potential For Positive Feedback Between West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) Deglaciation, Decompression-melt-induced Volcanism, And Resultant Sea-level Rise

by Dr. John Behrendt

The West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) flows through the volcanically active West Antarctic Rift System (WARS); subglacial  heat flow is high beneath the WAIS. Aeromagnetic surveys over WAIS have revealed >1000 high-amplitude, shallow source magnetic anomalies indicative of the late Cenozoic – recent age volcanic rocks in the WARS.  Satellite altimetry shows rapid retreat of ice shelves bordering WAIS.  GRACE satellite data indicate accelerating mass loss from WAIS, reducing basal pressure. Increased volcanic activity resulting from decompression mantle melting beneath a thinning WAIS may serve as a heretofore unexplored positive feedback mechanism that could further destabilize WAIS.  In both Iceland, and on midoceanic ridges, dated volcanism suggests that decompression melting of mantle associated with reductions in either ice or water loads can drive significant volcanism. Acceleration of volcanic activity could enhance the rate of loss of WAIS ice, with concomitant rates of rise of global sea level. 

date

Wednesday, March 1, 2017
11:00am to 12:00pm

location

RL-2 (on East Campus) room 155
2017-03-01
 
 
 
 
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CSTPR Noontime Seminar

CSTPR Noontime Seminar

Emerging Biotechnologies and Public Engagement

by Jason Delborne
Science, Policy, and Society, North Carolina State

Abstract: In 2016, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine released a report entitled, Gene Drives on the Horizon: Advancing Science, Navigating Uncertainty, and Aligning Research with Public Values. The report was motivated by the rapid pace of investigation made possible by CRISPR-based gene drives; laboratory proofs of concept in fruit flies, yeast, and mosquitoes; as well as the ambitious agenda under consideration for the possible deployment of gene drives. Whether imagined as a tool to end malaria, a new mechanism to control agricultural pests, or a means to eradicate invasive species, gene drives represent an emerging biotechnology that would persist and spread in the environment in ways that traditional GMOs have not. Such characteristics challenge notions of scientific responsibility, regulatory oversight, the management of risk, and the incorporation of public values in governance. Jason Delborne, Associate Professor of Science, Policy, and Society at North Carolina State University, served on the committee that authored the report and specializes in conceptualizing and conducting public engagement in science and technology. His talk will reflect on the NASEM report’s findings, with particular focus on its recommendations for sustained community, stakeholder, and public engagement.

Biography: Jason Delborne is Associate Professor of Science, Policy, and Society at North Carolina State University. Hired in 2013 in the Chancellor’s Faculty Excellence Program to join the Genetic Engineering and Society cluster, his tenure home is in the Department of Forestry and Environmental Resources in the College of Natural Resources. Dr. Delborne’s research, which draws on the interdisciplinary field of Science, Technology, and Society (STS), explores highly politicized scientific controversies with particular attention to interactions among policymakers, scientists, and the public. Currently, he leads a collaborative NSF grant to study the genetically modified American chestnut tree, designed to restore the functionally extinct species, and potentially the first GMO to be released that is intended to persist and spread in the environment. Dr. Delborne received an A.B. in Human Biology from Stanford University in 1993 and a Ph.D. in Environmental Science, Policy, and Management from the University of California, Berkeley in 2005. After completing a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, he joined the faculty at Colorado School of Mines in 2008 in the Division of Liberal Arts and International Studies, which provided many opportunities to interact with CSTPR community of faculty and students.

date

Wednesday, March 8, 2017
12:00pm

location

CSTPR Conference Room

resources

CSTPR
2017-03-08
 
 
 
 
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CSTPR Noontime Seminar:

CSTPR Noontime Seminar:

Climate Change Politics and Machine Learning

by Justin Farrell
Yale University

date

Wednesday, March 15, 2017
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

CSTPR Conference Room

resources

CSTPR
2017-03-15
 
 
Stand Up for Climate Change: An Experiment With Creative Climate Comedy

Stand Up for Climate Change: An Experiment With Creative Climate Comedy

Stand Up for Climate Change: An Experiment With Creative Climate Comedy

Old Main Auditorium
University of Colorado Boulder

View Flyer

Humor is a tool underutilized, and comedy has the power to effectively connect with people about climate change issues. Our event is associated with the Spring 2017 ‘Creative Climate Communication' course (ENVS3173/THTR4173) and the larger 'Inside the Greenhouse' project.

date

Friday, March 17, 2017
7:00pm
CSTPR
2017-03-17
 
 
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CSTPR Noontime Seminar

CSTPR Noontime Seminar

Machine Learning, Social Learning and Self-Driving Cars

by Jack Stilgoe
Department of Science and Technology Studies, University College London

date

Wednesday, March 22, 2017
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

CSTPR Conference Room

resources

CSTPR
2017-03-22
 
 
 
 
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