Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences



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NOAA Chemical Sciences Division Seminar

NOAA Chemical Sciences Division Seminar

Ensemble Forecasts of Air Quality in Asia: An operational multi-model approach, by Guy Brasseur, Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg, and NCAR   
Every year, more than 3 million people die prematurely from breathing outdoor air pollutants, which, according to the World Health Organization, triggers heart failures, strokes, pulmonary diseases and lung cancers. Air pollution (back ground concentrations and acute episodes) has therefore become a global environmental problem that needs to be urgently addressed. The problem has become particularly dramatic in several regions of the world such as China where the economy has been growing very rapidly. In order to better predict, and hopefully avoid, the occurrence of high levels of particulate matter (PM), ozone, and other pollutants, a multi-model analysis and prediction system has been developed by combining nine European and Chinese chemical transport models. The system has been developed for eastern China as part of the European Panda and MarcoPolo Projects.
The presentation will describe the system, which is now operational, present some illustrative examples of air quality forecasts, and highlight challenges. It will discuss ways to downscale model forecasts to city block scales in urban areas and to reduce biases in the predictions. Perspectives for applying such systems in other parts of the world (e.g., Latin America) will be provided. A new international initiative, called Monitoring, Analysis and Prediction of Air Quality (MAP-AQ) will be briefly discussed.
Guy Brasseur is the group leader of the Environmental Modeling group at the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg (Germany) and a Distinguished Scholar at the National Center of Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO.
Remote access: 
https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/8018503390140119043

date

Wednesday, August 2, 2017 to Thursday, August 3, 2017
3:30pm to 4:30pm

location

DSRC room 2A305

Event Type

Seminar

contact

Barbara Ervens (303-497-4396), Carsten Warneke (303-497-3601), Jane August (303-497-4165) or Jeanne Waters (303-497-3134)
 
 
 
 
CSTPR Seminar

CSTPR Seminar

New Coordinates for Environmental Documentary: How have nature and environmental documentaries changed since the internet arrived?, by Bienvenido León, School of Communication, University of Navarra (Spain), FIRST Scholar, University of Colorado Boulder

 

Free and open to the public. Co-hosted by the Inside the Greenhouse Project.

This talk will be available via live webcast. To view the live webcast please go to Adobe Connect and login as a guest.

 

Along 120 years of existence, this chameleon-like genre has adapted to many different circumstances. At the very beginning audiences took it for granted that documentary was a legitimate representation of the historical world. However, shortly afterwards, it needed to struggle in a constant search for legitimation. And this was especially relevant when it needed to adapt to a competitive television environment dominated by entertainment, by hybridizing with fiction formats. More recently, the digital tsunami seems to have added a new important driving force: the search for participation. And this new coordinate has added a new challenge, since the referential value of documentary cannot be taken for granted anymore. In the talk, I will discuss some ideas and show a few examples that illustrate how environmental documentary has evolved, in order to adapt to this new ecosystem.

Biography: Bienvenido León is associate professor of science journalism and television production at the University of Navarra (Spain). He has also worked as a documentary film director, scriptwriter and producer for over 30 years. He teaches regularly in other universities of Spain and other countries, and has been a visiting scholar at the University of North Carolina and the University of Otago. His research has mainly focused on audio-visual science and environment communication. He is the founding director of the Research Group on Science Communication at this university, and currently the director of the international research project “Online video as a tool for communicating science”. He has published 21 books as author or editor and over 60 peer-reviewed papers or book chapters. Before joining the academic field, he worked as a TV journalist for a decade. He has founded and directed two environmental film festivals: Telenatura (2001-2013) and Urban TV (2002-2014).

León is part of the Summer Session FIRST (Faculty-In-Residence Summer Term) program, which brings prominent scholars and teachers from across the nation to join the ranks of the University of Colorado Boulder's summer faculty. The Office of the Vice Provost for Summer Session sponsors the FIRST program, which broadens both the faculty expertise and the curricula offered to Summer Session students.

 

date

Thursday, August 3, 2017
3:00pm

location

CSTPR Conference Room, 1333 Grandview Ave

Event Type

CSTPR

contact

Ami Nacu-Schmidt, 303-735-3102
2017-08-03
 
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NOAA Physical Sciences Division Seminar

NOAA Physical Sciences Division Seminar

Examining the Performance of Statistical Downscaling Methods: Toward matching applications with the right tool, by Keith Dixon, NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory

Despite advancements in global climate model (GCM) spatial resolution and simulation quality, raw GCM output is often deemed to be inappropriate for direct use in many climate impacts studies. Statistical downscaling (SD) methods represent one approach to addressing GCM shortcomings via processing that gleans information from a combination of observations and the climate change response simulated by a dynamical model. All SD methods contain an underlying assumption that statistical relationships based on historical observations will apply equally well when used to refine historical model simulations and future climate projections. However, lacking observations of the future, there is no straightforward way to determine how a SD method's skill might diminish when applied to future scenarios. For these reasons, we have developed a perfect model framework in which high resolution models serve as a proxy for observations, thereby allowing quantitative assessments of SD method skill both for the contemporary climate and for future projections. This presentation will describe the perfect model approach and present results illustrating how SD method performance can vary by location, season, downscaling method, climate variable of interest, amount of projected climate change, and whether one is interested in central tendencies or the tails of the distribution - a set of factors that are relevant when determining whether a particular SD data product is well matched to a climate impacts application.

 

date

Tuesday, August 8, 2017
2:00pm to 3:00pm

location

DSRC room 1D403

Event Type

Seminar

contact

Shannon Kelly, Shannon.Kelly@noaa.gov, 303-497-3754
2017-08-08
 
NOAA Chemical Sciences Division Seminar

NOAA Chemical Sciences Division Seminar

Aerosol Particle Organic Mass Formation: HOMs uptake, multiphase isoprene oxidation and cloud processing by Hartmut Herrmann, Leipzig Institute for Tropospheric Research (TROPOS), Germany

In the first part results from the Leipzig Aerosol Chamber (LEAK) and selected field investigations will be presented and discussed which deal with the formation of highly oxidized molecules (HOMs) from terpenes and their transfer into the particle phase. Here, investigations of ozone and OH initiation will be discussed with emphasis on particle phase analytics. Molecular mechanisms will be outlined and the potential impact of HOMs transfer on particle oxidant levels will be studied by CAPRAM modelling. In the second part, a study on the aqueous phase chemistry of dihydroxy carbonyl compounds resulting from isoprene oxidation under low NOx conditions will be given. Here, rate constants for free radical reactions have been derived and product studies have been undertaken. In the third part, the Hill-Cap Cloud Thuringia (HCCT-2010) will be described and results will be presented to characterize chemical aerosol-cloud interaction resulting in changing processed particle composition both with regards to inorganic and organic constituents. The results suggest that additionally formed organic mass during cloud processing is related to both anthropogenic emissions and the intensity of solar radiation under the campaign conditions. A summary and an outlook will be given.

Remote access: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7019492622255268865

date

Wednesday, August 9, 2017
3:30pm

location

DSRC (NOAA Building), Room 2A305, 325 Broadway, Boulder.

Event Type

Seminar

contact

Jeanne Waters, 303-497-3134, Jeanne.S.Waters@noaa.gov
2017-08-09
 
Crysopheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Crysopheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Decadal changes of surface elevation over permafrost area estimated using reflected GPS signals, by Lin Liu, Earth System Science Programme, Faculty of Science, the Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China

Conventional benchmark-based surveys and Global Positioning System (GPS) have been used to measure surface elevation changes over permafrost areas, usually once or a few times a year. Here we introduce a new method that uses 10 reflected GPS signals to measure temporal changes of ground surface elevation due to dynamics of the active layer and near-surface permafrost. Applying the GPS interferometric reflectometry technique to the signal-to-noise-ratio data collected by a continuous GPS receiver mounted deep in permafrost in Barrow, Alaska, we can retrieve the vertical distance between the antenna and surface reflector under the antenna. Using this unique kind of observables, we obtain daily changes of surface elevation during July and August from 2004 to 2015. Our results show distinct temporal variations at three timescales: 15 regular thaw settlement within each summer, strong inter-annual variability that is characterized by a sub-decadal subsidence trend followed by a brief uplift trend, and a secular subsidence trend of 0.26+/-0.02 cm/year during 2004 and 2015. This method provides a new way to fully utilize data from continuous GPS sites in cold regions for studying dynamics of the frozen ground consistently and sustainably over a long time.

date

Thursday, August 10, 2017
10:00am

location

NSIDC, Room 155, East Campus, RL-2, 1540 30th Street

Event Type

NSIDC
2017-08-10
 
 
 
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International Glaciological Society Seminar

International Glaciological Society Seminar

International Symposium on Polar Ice, Polar Climate, Polar Change: Remote sensing and modeling advances in understanding the cryosphere


The changes of the past 15 years in Arctic and Antarctic sea ice and the ice sheets appear to be a prelude to new levels of impact of the polar regions on global climate and sea level. The first-year ice system is expanding in the Arctic, with processes comparable to those of Antarctic sea ice. Antarctic sea-ice extent is highly variable and is responding to shifts in ocean circulation and wind patterns. Both polar sea-ice systems interact in important ways with climate and with the adjacent ice sheets. Much of the growing awareness and understanding of polar change hascome from the tremendous success of satellite and airborne remote sensing, supporting both process studies and modeling of the geophysical basis for observed changes. The proposed symposium will both summarize new, high-profile results from the international research communities and provide a synthesis of current understanding as climate change impacts continue.
 

Full program of all events: https://www.igsoc.org/symposia/2017/boulder/proceedings/programmepure.html

date

Monday, August 14, 2017 to Monday, August 21, 2017
8:00am to 5:00pm

location

University Memorial Center, University of Colorado Boulder

Event Type

Seminar

contact

International Glaciological Society, igsoc@igsoc.org
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NOAA Chemical Sciences Division Seminar

NOAA Chemical Sciences Division Seminar

A Fresh Look at Dirty Air: 40 years of effort to reach the U.S. ozone NAAQS by David Parrish, NOAA ESRL CSD & CIRES/CU Boulder

In the 1950s and 1960s the U.S. (particularly the Los Angeles urban area) experienced extremely poor air quality; measured ambient ozone concentrations in those decades have not been equaled anywhere else in the world. Although today many U.S. urban areas still exceed the ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS), air quality has been greatly improved; however this improvement required more than 4 decades of concerted effort. Here we present a simple quantitative relationship that provides an excellent fit for the temporal evolution of ambient ozone concentrations, not only in the Los Angeles urban area (i.e., the South Coast Air Basin), but also all southern California air basins. Background ozone transported into the U.S. makes substantial contributions to ambient concentrations. The quantitative fit to the temporal evolution of ambient ozone concentrations allows observationally-based estimates of the magnitude of U.S. background ozone concentrations (i.e., the ambient ozone concentration that would be present in the absence of U.S. anthropogenic emissions of ozone precursors) in the respective air basins. Projection of the past temporal evolution into the future, suggests that reducing ozone to the 2015 NAAQS may be more difficult than currently expected. Comparisons of observationally-based estimates of U.S. background ozone concentrations to those from model calculations find significant disagreements, whose causes will be investigated.

Remote Access: Webinar Registration

 

 

date

Wednesday, August 16, 2017
3:30pm

location

DSRC (NOAA Building), Room 2A305, 325 Broadway, Boulder

Event Type

Seminar

contact

Jeanne Waters, 303-497-3134, Jeanne.S.Waters@noaa.gov
2017-08-16
 
 
 
 
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International Glaciological Society Seminar

International Glaciological Society Seminar

International Symposium on Polar Ice, Polar Climate, Polar Change: Remote sensing and modeling advances in understanding the cryosphere


The changes of the past 15 years in Arctic and Antarctic sea ice and the ice sheets appear to be a prelude to new levels of impact of the polar regions on global climate and sea level. The first-year ice system is expanding in the Arctic, with processes comparable to those of Antarctic sea ice. Antarctic sea-ice extent is highly variable and is responding to shifts in ocean circulation and wind patterns. Both polar sea-ice systems interact in important ways with climate and with the adjacent ice sheets. Much of the growing awareness and understanding of polar change hascome from the tremendous success of satellite and airborne remote sensing, supporting both process studies and modeling of the geophysical basis for observed changes. The proposed symposium will both summarize new, high-profile results from the international research communities and provide a synthesis of current understanding as climate change impacts continue.
 

Full program of all events: https://www.igsoc.org/symposia/2017/boulder/proceedings/programmepure.html

date

Monday, August 14, 2017 to Monday, August 21, 2017
8:00am to 5:00pm

location

University Memorial Center, University of Colorado Boulder

Event Type

Seminar

contact

International Glaciological Society, igsoc@igsoc.org
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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