Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences



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Crysopheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Crysopheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Understanding the atmospheric drivers of Arctic sea ice variability – the role of past and future aircraft experiments

Dr. Sebastian Schmidt
Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics and
Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

This seminar will explore how aircraft observations can be used to study atmosphere-radiation-surface interactions in the Arctic. Although shortcomings in model predictions of sea ice and atmospheric parameters play out on different spatial and temporal scales, they cannot be addressed separately because the atmosphere and the surface interact through different mechanisms that depend on region, season, and prevalent synoptic regimes. One can argue that this is precisely the challenge for future Arctic experiments. Aircraft observations are not the immediately obvious choice for studying complicated interaction processes, especially when these manifest themselves on variegated scales or magnitudes. Fortunately, we have learned a lot from recent radiation science experiments where aircraft observations were synthesized with ground-based and satellite data within a modeling framework. When integrated in such a way, airborne measurements turn out to be a key component in an observational strategy that can access interaction processes with adequate detail. I will give examples of this emerging trend, discuss some of the lessons learned, and touch on new capabilities. Building on these, I will motivate a new experiment initiative with science questions that link Arctic clouds, atmospheric structure, surface conditions, radiation and precipitation. A central goal is to diagnose (and ultimately improve) the ability of different models to trace Arctic clouds throughout their lifetime in a way that is consistent with merged airborne, surface, and satellite observations. I will present an evolving strategy for capturing the various scale-dependent interaction processes with observational approaches inherited from prior experiments, and invite the audience to join in the discussion of the most relevant science questions.

date

Wednesday, September 6, 2017
11:00am

location

NSIDC, Room 155, East Campus, RL-2, 1540 30th Street

Event Type

NSIDC
2017-09-06
 
USGS Seminar

USGS Seminar

Mapping burned areas using dense time-series of Landsat data

Dr. Todd Hawbaker and Dr. Melanie Vanderhoof

Hawbaker and Vanderhoof from the USGS in Lakewood, CO will be visiting  to talk about their most recently published data product and discuss potential collaboration with CIRES/Earth Lab groups. Hawbaker will be giving a 1 hour lecture on the creation and validation of the fire product.

Abstract: Complete and accurate burned area data are needed to document patterns of fires, to quantify their drivers, and to assess the impacts on human and natural systems. Unfortunately, existing fire occurrence datasets are known to be incomplete. In response, we developed the Burned Area Essential Climate Variable (BAECV) algorithm that identifies burned areas in dense time-series of Landsat data and used it to map burned areas across the conterminous United States from 1984-2015. The resulting products were validated using independent data and have accuracies better than existing global fire datasets. The BAECV products also show patterns of fire that are not well characterized by existing fire occurrence datasets. We anticipate the BAECV products will be useful to studies that seek to understand past patterns of fire occurrence, the drivers that created them, and the impacts fires have on natural and human systems.

date

Wednesday, September 6, 2017
10:00am to 11:00am

location

CIRES Auditorium

Event Type

Seminar
2017-09-06
 
 
 
 
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Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

 Investigating emissions of ultrafine aerosols from consumer products: A study on 3D printers

Prof. Nina Vance
CU Boulder Mechanical Engineering

ANALYTICAL & ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY DIVISION and
ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY PROGRAM SEMINAR

Abstract:
It is well established that inhalation of ultrafine aerosols (particulate matter < 100 nm) is associated with adverse health effects, however the extent of people’s everyday exposure to these pollutants is still poorly known. The introduction of novel consumer product applications and processes present the potential to introduce new ultrafine aerosols and nanoparticles to indoor environments such as homes, office buildings, schools, hotels, and hospitals. In this presentation, I will discuss the use of methods at the intersection of air resources engineering, nanotechnology, and exposure science to quantify and characterize people’s exposure to ultrafine aerosols and nanomaterials in everyday activities. This will be specifically demonstrated by a case study on aerosol emissions from 3D printers. The aerosol emission rates and size distributions that can be characterized by this type of work can serve as input to risk assessment models, to guide the selection of relevant particle doses in toxicity testing, and to engineer product improvements or develop regulations to ensure consumer safety.

Bio:
Dr. Marina Vance is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and in the Environmental Engineering Program at the University of Colorado Boulder. Before joining CU Boulder, she was the Associate Director of the Virginia Tech Center for Sustainable Nanotechnology (VTSuN) and Deputy Director of the VT National Center for Earth and Environmental Nanotechnology Infrastructure (NanoEarth). Dr. Vance received her Ph.D. in Civil and Environmental Engineering from Virginia Tech in 2012 for studying the release of nanomaterials from the use of everyday consumer products. She received her Bachelor’s and Master’s in Environmental Engineering by the Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (Brazil). Her research is focused on applying engineering tools to better understand and minimize human exposure to novel environmental contaminants from everyday activities, especially nanomaterials and ultrafine aerosols.

date

Monday, September 11, 2017
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

Ekeley S274

Event Type

Seminar
2017-09-11
 
 
Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Ice for Whales, Ice for Whaling: Observing the Current State of an Arctic FoodshedIce for Whales, Ice for Whaling: Observing the Current State of an Arctic Foodshed
Matthew L. Druckenmiller, PhD

National Snow and Ice Data Center, University of Colorado Boulder, Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences, Rutgers University, Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH)

Abstract:

This presentation will discuss two separate but related efforts to understand the implications of a changing ice cover in the Pacific Arctic. First, I will describe a long-term effort to observe the state of the shore fast sea ice near Utqiaġvik (formerly Barrow), Alaska during the community’s spring hunting season. Since 2006, we have monitored ice thickness and morphology using electromagnetic induction along ice trails that the local Iñupiat whaling crews use to access hunting sites at the shore fast ice edge. These observations, together with shared knowledge and accounts from hunters, provide a long-term record for how the hunting community observes changing ice conditions, assesses safety, and efficiently strategizes and adapts their hunt for the bowhead whale—a species uniquely adapted to Arctic waters. Second, I will discuss recent and ongoing studies to understand how changing sea ice conditions in the Beaufort Sea and in other key habitat locations are impacting the distribution, migration timing, and overall health of the Bering-Chukchi-Beaufort (BCB) bowhead population. Recent findings suggest that ice loss is currently contributing to healthier (fatter) whales, a greater and more varied range, and an overall more subtle relationship to sea ice than previously thought. Together, these two lines of research are observing the current state of a complex Arctic foodshed that is intricately linked to changes in sea ice, as well as culture, conservation, and international policy.

date

Wednesday, September 13, 2017
11:00am to 12:00pm

location

East Campus, RL-2, Room 155

Event Type

NSIDC

contact

Mistia.Zuckerman@colorado.edu
2017-09-13
 
CSTPR Noontime Seminar

CSTPR Noontime Seminar

Forests, finance and conservation: A turn in US climate policy by Lauren Gifford, Geography Department, University of Colorado Boulder
Winner of the 2017 Radford Byerly Award

This talk will be available via live webcast. To view the live webcast please go to Adobe Connect and login as a guest.

California’s cap and trade program is one of the most established carbon markets in the world, and relies on a network of offsets to help participants balance their carbon budgets. One of these mechanisms involves investment in forest conservation as a means of offsetting industrial emissions. This talk explores the implications of climate policy-driven investment in forest conservation, with a focus on several projects in Maine that are tied to California’s carbon market.

This talk takes a critical approach, drawing on political ecology and science and technology studies (STS) to ask how, and by whom, climate and conservation policies enacted. It explores how a mechanism originally designed to address industrial GHG emissions on the west coast has become a major tool for conservation funding on the other side of the country. Data collection draws on a suite of qualitative methods, including more than 100 interviews collected over five years of fieldwork, from Maine, to the Peruvian Amazon, to the United Nations annual climate negotiations, as well as participant observation in carbon accounting training courses through the Greenhouse Gas Management Institute. This research reveals the role of the financial industry in designing and brokering forest carbon projects, and illuminates the linked worlds of forestry and finance as key to making forests legible within climate action plans. Finally, the research shows that what was designed as a tool to help polluters administratively address their carbon budgets has become a vital funding source for conservation and economic development in a region struggling amid a collapsed paper industry and depressed local economies. 

Biography: Lauren Gifford is a PhD candidate in Geography. Her dissertation is titled “See the carbon through the trees: Market-based climate change mitigation, forest carbon offsets, and the uneven power of carbon accounting” She was the recipient of the 2017 Radford Byerly, Jr. Award in Science and Technology Policy and used the grant, in part, to support summer dissertation research in Grand Lake Stream, Maine.

date

Wednesday, September 13, 2017
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

CSTPR Conference Room

resources

Event Type

CSTPR
2017-09-13
 
Special Seminar: Films Preview

Special Seminar: Films Preview

Glaciers and Sea Ice and Polar Bears, Oh, My! 
Join us Thursday to preview a set of incredible short films detailing the processes and critical importance of our globe’s polar regions! Thursday, September 14th at 11am in the CIRES Auditorium, CIRES’ Jen Kay, Ariel Morrison, and Barbara MacFerrin, in collaboration with CIRES Education and Outreach, will showcase three 5-minute videos targeted at college undergrads. Their work is funded by Kay’s prestigious NSF Early Career Award. And the videos are stunning.

 

date

Thursday, September 14, 2017
11:00am

location

CIRES Auditorium

resources

Event Type

Seminar
2017-09-14
 
 
 
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Analytical Chemistry Seminar

Analytical Chemistry Seminar

Comprehensive Analysis of the Gas- and Particle-Phase Products of VOC Oxidation, by Julia Bakker-Arkema/CU Boulder

Jointly sponsored by the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, CIRES, and the Environmental Program

Abstract: "Controlled environmental chamber studies are important for determining atmospheric reaction mechanisms and gas and aerosol products formed in the oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Such information is necessary for developing detailed chemical models for use in predicting the atmospheric fate of VOCs and also secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. However, complete characterization of atmospheric oxidation reactions, including gas- and particle-phase product yields, and reaction branching ratios, are difficult to achieve. In this work, we investigated the reactions of terminal alkenes with OH radicals in the presence of NOx in an attempt to fully characterize the chemistry of these systems while minimizing and accounting for the inherent uncertainties associated with environmental chamber experiments. Gas-phase products (aldehydes formed by alkoxy radical decomposition) and particle-phase products (alkyl nitrates, β-hydroxynitrates, dihydroxynitrates, 1,4-hydroxynitrates, 1,4-hydroxycarbonyls, and dihydroxycarbonyls) formed through pathways involving addition of OH to the C=C double bond as well as H-atom abstraction were identified and quantified using a suite of analytical techniques. The full product identification and quantitation, with careful minimization of uncertainties for the various components of the experiment and analyses, demonstrates our capability to comprehensively and accurately analyze the complex chemical composition of products formed in the oxidation of organic compounds in laboratory chamber studies."

date

Monday, September 18, 2017
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

Ekeley S274

resources

Event Type

Seminar
2017-09-18
 
 
Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Wet ‘n’ Wild Antarctica: mapping small-scale climate processes in coastal Antarctica combining climate models and observations

Jan Lenaerts, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University of Colorado Boulder

Abstract:

Antarctica is known as the coldest, driest, and windiest continent on Earth. But along its periphery, sharp topography invokes spectacular climate gradients. Coastal mountain ranges, directed perpendicular to the prevalent atmospheric flow, catch massive snowfall amounts on their windward side, leaving their leeward side much drier. Topography also strongly controls the surface wind field, which in turn impacts snow redistribution, erosion, and sublimation, as well as turbulent mixing processes in the atmosphere. In this talk, I will show that we can map and understand these features using a combination of high-resolution climate models, remote sensing, and field observations. Finally, the impacts of these climate gradients for ice shelf and ice sheet snow and firn conditions, hydrology, and mass balance will be discussed.

date

Wednesday, September 20, 2017
11:00am to 12:00pm

location

East Campus, RL-2, Room 155

contact

Mistia.Zuckerman@colorado.edu
2017-09-20
 
ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC Coffee Event

date

Thursday, September 21, 2017
9:00am to 10:00am

location

ESOC Reading Room

contact

Ashley.Olson@colorado.edu
2017-09-21
 
Earth Lab Workshop

Earth Lab Workshop

Version Control Workshop: Leah Wasser, Max Joseph

Earth Lab is hosting a Git / GitHub - version control workshop on Friday 9/22 from 1-4pm in the Earth Lab SEEC space, room S372A. The workshop will be led by Dr. Leah Wasser and Dr. Max Joseph and will include an introduction to version control, Git installation and configuration, and typical collaborative workflows using Git and GitHub (e.g. forking, cloning, committing, pushing, pull requests, and more). Participants will be admitted to the workshop on a first come, first serve basis so please RSVP soon using this Google Form.

date

Friday, September 22, 2017
1:00pm to 4:00pm

location

SEEC, Room S372A

contact

Lauren.Herwehe@colorado.edu
2017-09-22
 
 
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CSTPR 15th Anniversary

CSTPR 15th Anniversary

CIRES Center for Science and Technology Policy Research 15th Anniversary
Keynote Address by Brian Deese

Old Main Chapel, University of Colorado Boulder
1600 Pleasant Street, Boulder (Directions)

Eventbrite - CSTPR 15th Anniversary

Free and open to the public - Tickets required for entry

Keynote Address by Brian Deese

Brian DeeseBrian Deese
From restructuring the American auto industry to securing the Paris Climate Agreement, economic and clean energy expert Brian Deese was the President’s point person on some of the most historic undertakings of the Obama administration. During eight years that ran the gamut from financial crisis to momentous achievements in healthcare, environmental protection and bipartisan budget legislation, Deese rose to the position of Senior Advisor, counseling the President and shaping policy on conservation, energy, financial regulation, job creation and the economic impact of healthcare reform. A key driver of U.S. global leadership on climate change, Deese was responsible for engagement with China, India and other major economies and for implementing the Obama energy agenda at home and abroad. He acted as principal negotiator of the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015 and oversaw the Supreme Court nomination process of Judge Merrick Garland. Bringing perspectives gained in the White House inner circle and the center of major legislative and budget negotiations, Deese provides an insider’s outlook on subjects ranging from the future of healthcare and the economy to the future of our planet.

date

Thursday, September 28, 2017
7:00pm

location

Old Main Chapel

resources

Event Type

CSTPR
2017-09-28
 
Distinguished Lecture Series: Dr. Benjamin Cook

Distinguished Lecture Series: Dr. Benjamin Cook

Title: (The past and future of drought in the Western United States)

Abstract: The Western US has recently experienced several record breaking droughts that have had substantial impacts on water resources, agriculture, and ecosystems in the region. Climate change is expected to increase drought risk and severity through both localized precipitation declines and more widespread warming that will reduce the winter snowpack and increase evaporative losses. These impacts and mechanisms have already begun to manifest during the most recent events, and the effects of climate change have already been detected for droughts over California, the Pacific Northwest, and the Upper Colorado River Basin. Critically, continued warming in the future is expected to further increase drought risk in the Western US, with future events likely to eclipse even the worst multi-decadal megadroughts of the Medieval Climate Anomaly. Future drought impacts on ecosystems and people are likely to be more complex, however, depending on a variety of social, biological, and physical factors that are, at present, incompletely resolved.

Bio: Benjamin Cook is a climate scientist at the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York City, specializing in the study of drought and climate change. He received his Ph.D. at the University of Virginia in 2007 and was awarded a NOAA Global Change Postdoctoral fellowship from 2007-2009. His work has contribute to a variety of drought topics, including the North America megadroughts of the Medieval Era, the Dust Bowl drought of the 1930s, the impact of climate change on the recent drought in California, and wine harvest sensitivity to drought and temperature. His book, "Drought: An Interdisciplinary Perspective”, will be published by Columbia University Press in 2018.

date

Friday, September 29, 2017
3:00pm

location

CIRES Auditorium, Room 338

resources

Event Type

DLS

Amenities

Refreshments provided

2017-09-29