Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences



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Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Chemistry of Organic Compounds in the Atmosphere and Indoor Air by Prof. Paul Ziemann, CU Boulder and Recent Results and Upcoming Projects to Investigate Aerosol Sources, Properties, Processes, and Fate by Prof Jose-Luis Jimenez, CU Boulder

Chemistry of Organic Compounds in the Atmosphere and Indoor Air
Prof Paul Ziemann

Abstract:
"Laboratory studies provide much of the fundamental data on reaction kinetics, products, and mechanisms that are needed to understand atmospheric and indoor air chemistry and to develop models that are used to establish air quality regulations and predict the effects of human activities. Research in my laboratory focuses primarily on environmental chamber studies of the atmospheric chemistry of organic compounds emitted from natural and anthropogenic sources and the physical and chemical processes by which oxidized organic reaction products form aerosol particles. In addition to this we have recently conducted a number of studies of indoor air chemistry at CU. In this talk I will describe how we conduct the studies by using a diverse array of measurement techniques."
and

Recent Results and Upcoming Projects to Investigate Aerosol Sources, Properties, Processes, and Fate
Prof Jose-Luis Jimenez

Abstract:

"Organic aerosols (OA) account for about 1/2 of the submicron particle mass in the atmosphere leading to important impacts on climate, human health, and other issues, but their sources, properties, and evolution are poorly understood. In this talk I will present an overview and highlights of research on OA instrumentation, measurements, and modeling by our group over the last year, as well as of upcoming projects of potential interest to 1st year students. Ongoing projects include global aerosol measurements and analysis as part of the NASA ATOM project, which is sampling (almost) pole-to-pole across the vertical profile. Initial model comparisons suggest the importance of fast OA removal channels. We have used an Oxidation Flow Reactor (OFR) at multiple field studies and find consistent patterns, where SOA formation by O3 and NO3 are consistent with models, while formation by OH is substantially underpredicted unless semivolatile and intermediate volatility species are accounted for. We are using the GECKO-A fully explicit model to investigate this underprediction, as well as to characterize the similarities and differences of the chemical regimes across the OFR, large chambers, and the atmosphere. We are investigating gas/particle partitioning in the laboratory for different types of particles. Finally, we are continuing to explore the chemistry of indoor air with ToF-CIMS and other instruments. Future outdoor campaigns may include the study of emissions and chemical evolution of smoke from real fires in the western US (NASA FireChem) with AMS and soft-ionization EESI-TOF. Future indoor campaigns will involve sampling at locations such as dining halls, gyms, and art museums."

date

Monday, October 2, 2017
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

Ekeley S274

Event Type

Seminar

contact

Anne.Handschy@Colorado.EDU
2017-10-02
 
CMC End of Summer meeting

CMC End of Summer meeting

CIRES Members Council Introduction/Open Meeting

  • Meet CIRES' new Associate Director for Science Christine Wiedinmyer
  • Find out what the CMC does
  • Discuss the various functions of the organization and the different roles within it

Please feel free to bring your lunch; we will provide coffee and cookies. CMC meetings are open to all CIRES employees, and every employee has a  CMC representative. 

date

Monday, October 2, 2017
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

CIRES W230

Amenities

Refreshments provided

2017-10-02
 
 
Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Beyond water: impact of Greenland’s melt on its coastal sediment dynamics

Irina Overeem, INSTAAR, University of Colorado

Abstract:

Melt of the Greenland Ice Sheet releases large amounts of freshwater into the ocean, raising sea level globally. What else drains out of Greenland with this freshwater?
Here, we use field measurements, massively parallel satellite data analysis, and modeling to investigate sediment and nutrient fluxes and its possible impacts on biogeochemical cycles and the coastal zone. 
In-situ data and satellite methods demonstrate a tremendous amount of sediment drain from Greenland. River suspended sediment concentrations are highly variable, which is explained by a first-order model of glacial dynamics, with meltwater drainage basins with high glacier velocities producing the highest sediment concentrations. We find that, although runoff from Greenland represents only 1.1% of the Earth’s freshwater flux, the Greenland ice sheet produces approximately 8% of the modern fluvial export of fine sediment to the global ocean.
Whereas we do not have in-situ data on coarse bedload sediments, we infer coarse sediment transport from river delta dynamics. Systematic mapping of 121 Greenland’s deltas used historical air photos and more recent satellite imagery. We found that southwestern Greenland deltas were largely stable from the 1940s to 1980s, but prograded in a warming Arctic from the 1980s to 2010s. Statistical analysis corroborates that delta progradation has dominantly been driven by higher meltwater runoff from the Greenland Ice Sheet.
Greenland’s sediment dynamics may be unique in the world. As most of world’s rivers are carrying less sediment due to damming and temperate deltas are drowning from human-caused subsidence and global sea level rise, Greenland’s sediment fluxes are, in contrast, advancing because of the increased mass loss from Greenland’s land-based ice.

date

Wednesday, October 4, 2017
11:00am to 12:00pm

location

East Campus, RL-2, Room 155

Event Type

NSIDC

contact

Mistia.Zuckerman@colorado.edu
2017-10-04
 
Science Policy Kickoff for Grad Students

Science Policy Kickoff for Grad Students

Interested in Science Policy?

Or want to know what science policy even is?

Calling Grad Students and Post Docs!

Join CSTPR and the Forum on Scince Ethics and Policy for sandwiches and an informal dicussion with the panelists:

Lisa Dilling, Director of Western Water Assessment, Associate Professor of Environmental Studies, CIRES Fellow, and Associate Director of teh Center for Science and Technology Policy Research

Max Boykoff, Director of the Ceter for Science and Technology Policy Research, CIRES Fellow and Associate Professor of Environmental Studies

 

No RSVP needed.

date

Wednesday, October 4, 2017
12:30pm to 2:00pm

location

11th Floor of Gamow Tpwer, Duane Physics

Amenities

Lunch provided

contact

Adalyn.Fyhrie@colorado.edu
2017-10-04
 
ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC Reading Room

date

Thursday, October 5, 2017
9:00am to 10:00am

location

ESOC Reading Room

contact

Ashley.Olson@colorado.edu
2017-10-05
 
 
 
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Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Better Understanding Climate and Atmospheric Chemistry by Understanding the Formation of Mixed Phase Clouds by Prof Dan Cziczo, MIT


Abstract:
"Field and laboratory measurements using cloud chambers have been used to understand the atmospheric abundance of droplet and ice nucleating particles and to, in turn, construct parameterizations for mixed-phase and completely glaciated clouds in weather and climate models. This seminar investigates measurements of which particles act as the nuclei for droplets and ice crystals and how we can then mimic those particles in the laboratory to understand how clouds form in our atmosphere. We show here that assumptions about the source of the particles as well as uncertainty in the laboratory and field measurements propagate into uncertainty in our understanding of the Earth’s climate and the chemistry of our atmosphere.
When we consider cloud chambers, uncertainty is likely inherent to varying degrees in all instruments and is caused by a variety of factors including exposure of particles to different humidities and/or temperatures than predicated from theory. This can result in a variable underestimation of reported droplet and ice concentrations. This is a critical issue for models which relay on these data for correct parameterizations of cloud formation. For ice clouds in particular, we find that simulated long wave ice-bearing cloud forcing in a global climate model can vary up to 0.8 W/m2 and can change sign from positive to negative within the experimentally constrained bias range.
We’ll conclude with a discussion of possible instrument improvements and how these can improve our understanding of climate, precipitation and atmospheric chemistry."

 


ANALYTICAL & ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY DIVISION and
ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY PROGRAM SEMINAR

Jointly sponsored by the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, CIRES, and the Environmental Program

date

Monday, October 9, 2017
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

Ekeley S274

Event Type

Seminar

contact

Anne.Handschy@Colorado.EDU
2017-10-09
 
 
Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

SAR Remote Sensing for Monitoring Mountain Glacier Surface Movements in High Mountain Asia by
Zhixing Ruan, Institute of Remote Sensing and Digital Earth (RADI), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS).

She is a visitor at NSIDC for the 2017-2018 school year, working with NSIDC’s glaciologist Bruce Raup

Abstract: 

Mountain glacier dynamic parameters, such as velocity fields and motion patterns, are important for studies of environment and climate change in high mountain Asia. Characterized by being independent of cloud cover and solar illumination, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) operating at long wavelength has provided an invaluable way to detect and measure mountain glacier motion. However, the traditional algorithms applied to mountain glacier regions are constrained by the complex terrain and diverse glacial motion types. In order to derive glacier velocities continually and efficiently, we propose a modified processing strategy to exploit SAR data information for mountain glaciers. In my presentation, I will introduce our improved algorithms for compensating non-glacial-motion-related signals which exist in the offset values retrieved by sub-pixel cross-correlation of SAR image pairs. I will also present some study cases of glacier motion changes based on our algorithms, such as West Kunlun Mountain, Muztag Mountain and Kungay Mountain in western China.

date

Wednesday, October 11, 2017
11:00am to 12:00pm

location

East Campus, RL-2, Room 155

Event Type

NSIDC

contact

Mistia.Zuckerman@colorado.edu
2017-10-11
 
ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC Reading Room

date

Thursday, October 12, 2017
9:00am to 10:00am

location

ESOC Reading Room

contact

Ashley.Olson@colorado.edu
2017-10-12
 
Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Indoor air (photo)chemistry: A world-wide concern by Sasho Gligorovski
State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences


Abstract:
"The first field campaign performed in a high school in Marseille, France (2011) confirmed the existence of hydroxyl radicals (OH) that were more in line with typical outdoor concentrations than indoor concentrations (Gomez Alvarez et al., 2013). It was demonstrated that photolysis of nitrous acid (HONO) is the most important source of these highly reactive OH radicals in the indoor air. This set of innovatory first direct measurements of OH radicals indoors was followed with also avant-garde measurements of the solar actinic fluxes which can penetrate indoors and photolysis frequencies of key indoor species (Gandolfo et al., 2016). The results obtained are of enormous repercussions and need to be studied in the next few years much more profoundly due to their still unexplored implications. The facts just mentioned need to be taken in combination with the elevated concentrations of HONO present in the indoor air (Gligorovski, 2016). In addition, HONO is an important indoor air pollutant, which can react with amines leading to carcinogenic nitrosamines. While our understanding of photochemistry of the indoor surfaces is still in its infancy, the recent results (Gomez Alvarez et al., 2014, Gandolfo et al., 2015, 2017) based on the light induced heterogeneous NO2 reactions on domestic surfaces leading to HONO formation, suggest that it is an area that should be pursued further. Another campaign carried out in an office in Martigue, France (2016) was dedicated to evaluation of OH radical source strength. Again, the photochemical reactions play an important role to the oxidation capacity of indoor atmosphere. If we consider all these facts carefully, the concentration of OH radicals indoors, could reach levels that would be of serious concern from the standpoint of public health. For these reasons, it is very important to dedicate more efforts to determine the OH concentrations that can be attained in various indoor settings, in relation to factors such as light intensity, HONO concentrations, and humidity, among others."

date

Friday, October 13, 2017
4:00pm to 5:00pm

location

Ekeley S274

Event Type

Seminar

contact

Anne.Handschy@Colorado.EDU
2017-10-13
 
 
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CSTPR Noontime Seminar

CSTPR Noontime Seminar

Sustained assessment in the US southwest by Benét Duncan, Western Water Assessment, University of Colorado Boulder

This talk will be available via live webcast. To view the live webcast please go to Adobe Connect and login as a guest.

The US National Climate Assessment provides foundational information about the impacts of climate change in large assessment reports that are released every four years. In the most recent report (NCA3), authors highlighted the value of developing a sustained national climate assessment in which information is produced on an ongoing basis. In the Sustained Climate Assessment in the Southwest project, researchers at Western Water Assessment are investigating opportunities for sustained climate assessment in the US Southwest National Climate Assessment (NCA) region – an area that consists of Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, and Utah. This work is focused on developing recommendations for an ongoing, regional climate assessment process in collaboration with climate service providers and users. Such a process would provide timely and regionally-relevant climate information that is sometimes more detailed than what can be included in a national-scale assessment like the NCA. It would also connect climate information providers and users to increase understanding of climate impacts in decision-making contexts, and build a foundation of knowledge and relationships that can be drawn on in larger-scale assessment processes.

This talk will focus on the history of sustained climate assessment and the value of a regional approach, and explore opportunities and challenges that have arisen in the process of developing recommendations for a regional assessment process.

Benet DuncanBiography: Benét Duncan is Western Water Assessment's Climate Assessment Specialist, and she is leading the Sustained Climate Assessment in the Southwest project. She works to understand how organizations produce climate services and the climate information needs of stakeholders in our region with the ultimate goal of contributing to a regional and national scale sustained climate assessment infrastructure. Prior to joining WWA, Benét worked at the science-policy interface with the California Ocean Science Trust. Before that, she was a postdoctoral fellow in UCAR’s Postdocs Applying Climate Expertise (PACE) program, hosted by Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary. Benét received her MS and PhD in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences from the University of Colorado, and her BS in Atmospheric Science from the University of California Davis.

date

Wednesday, October 18, 2017
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

CSTPR Conference Room

resources

Event Type

CSTPR
2017-10-18
 
Earth Analytics in the Cloud Day

Earth Analytics in the Cloud Day

Earth Analytics in the Cloud Day Seminar

There is no cost to attend.

This full-day program is intended to inform researchers, sustainability, agriculture, and environmental-science thinkers, and the broader business community about cutting-edge sustainability research initiatives, real-world technology use cases, and big data analytics. View the agenda and register here

date

Thursday, October 19, 2017
9:30am to 6:00pm

location

Sustainability, Energy and Environment Complex (SEEC) University of Colorado Boulder, Room: #C120 (Auditorium) Discovery Drive, Boulder, CO 80303
2017-10-19
 
ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC Weekly Coffee

Special Speaker: Integrated optics for mid- and long-wavelength sensing
Presented by: Juliet T. Gopinath & Wounjhang Park

Abstract: 

Recently, ultrafast and nonlinear integrated devices have captured interest for frequency metrology, sensing, and imaging.  An excellent platform for nonlinear optical devices is offered by chalcogenide glasses, which contain a chalcogen element such as S, Se or Te covalently bonded to one or more elements.   These materials have many favorable attributes including high nonlinearities, long wavelength transparencies up to 20 mm, flexible substrate choice, and low nonlinear absorption.  

In particular, Ge28Se12Sb60  chalcogenide material is attractive due to its As-free composition, stability, large nonlinearity and high glass transition temperature of 300 oC.  Progress on integrated optical devices for the near, mid, and long-wavelength infrared is presented, including nonlinear optical characterization of bulk and thin-film samples, waveguides, and resonant structures.  These devices are particularly promising for sensing and as flexible optical sources.

Additionally, miniature diode-based laser systems as well as light with orbital angular momentum will be discussed for sensing applications.

 

Biography: Juliet Gopinath is an Associate Professor of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering at the University of Colorado Boulder.   She received her B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Minnesota and her M.S. and Ph.D. degrees at MIT.   She worked at MIT Lincoln Laboratory from 2005 to 2009 on topics including cryogenic Yb:YAG lasers, beam combining, and mode-locked diode lasers.   Her current research interests include ultrafast lasers, nonlinear optics, mid-infrared materials, spectroscopy, orbital angular momentum and adaptive optical devices.   She is the recipient of an Air Force Young Investigator Award (2010), R & D 100 Award (2012), an NSF CAREER award (2016), and is an Associate Editor for IEEE Photonics Journal.

Biography: Wounjhang (Won) Park received his Ph.D. from Georgia Institute of Technology. He then worked as Post-Doctoral Fellow and Research Scientist II at the Georgia Tech Research Institute until he joined the faculty of University of Colorado Boulder where he is currently N. Rex Sheppard Professor of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering Program and University of Colorado Cancer Center. Dr. Park’s research interest is mainly in the light-matter interaction in nanostructures. Current research focuses on the thermal radiation engineering for energy harvesting, plasmonic nanostructures for cancer detection and therapy and mid-infrared photonic devices. Dr. Park has published over 100 peer-reviewed technical articles and 4 invited book chapters and holds 5 U.S. patents. He is the recipient of Ruth L. Kirschstein NRSA Senior Fellowship in Cancer Nanotechnology from the National Institute of Health, the Provost’s Faculty Achievement Award and Sheppard Faculty Fellowship from the University of Colorado Boulder and Changbai Scholar Award from the Chinese government.

date

Thursday, October 19, 2017
9:00am to 10:00am

location

ESOC Reading Room

contact

Ashley.Olson@colorado.edu
2017-10-19
 
 
 
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Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

VOCs off-gassed by laser and inkjet printers; and CH4, CO2, and N2O gas fluxes in created wetlands by Wyatt Brown, CU Boulder, ANYL first year student
"Indoor air quality has become a more prominently researched subject in recent years, and indoor office environments are still poorly understood in terms of the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) associated with them. We have identified and quantified various VOCs off-gassed by laser and inkjet printers using solid phase micro-extraction in conjunction with GC/MS.
In the outdoor environment, it has been well-established that wetlands are important ecosystems for the planet and provide a multitude of ecological services. In order to combat the widespread destruction of wetlands, restoration efforts have recently seen a dramatic increase in prevalence. However, there is a complex, poorly understood relationship between the functions of created wetlands and the emission of greenhouse gasses. In this talk, the preliminary data on CH4, CO2, and N2O gas fluxes in created wetlands is presented. Preliminary dissolved organic matter (DOM) studies are also presented."


and


The reaction of acetyl peroxy radical with hydroperoxy radical by Marla DeVault, CU Boulder, ANYL first year student
"I spent three summers working in Prof. Keith Kuwata's computational chemistry lab at Macalester College. Primarily, my research focused on improving the steps taken to simulate reactions of organic peroxy radicals (OPR's) in the atmosphere. More specifically, I studied the reaction of acetyl peroxy radical with hydroperoxy radical, which is thought to be a source of hydroxy radical. These steps include determining which simple model chemistry could most accurately model the reaction, investigating the viability of non-reactive conformers, and testing methods for calculating the energy of transition structures."
 

date

Monday, October 23, 2017
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

Ekeley S274

contact

Anne.Handschy@Colorado.EDU
2017-10-23
 
Earth Lab - Grand Challenge Discussion Panel

Earth Lab - Grand Challenge Discussion Panel

"Communicating Science in a Post-Truth World"
A discussion featuring Nancy Baron (COMPASS), John Upton (Climate Central), Ashley Ahearn (KUOW/NPR), David Malakoff (Science Magazine), Jennifer Weeks (The Conservation), and Jeff Burnside (Scripps Environmental Jourmalism Fellow). 

Leading science journalists discuss how current events are influencing science journalism—and societies' conversations.

date

Monday, October 23, 2017
4:00pm to 5:15pm

location

Old Main Chapel

contact

Chelsea.Nagy@colorado.edu
2017-10-23
 
 
Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Paleo-environmental studies on permafrost deposits in western Beringia - from field sampling to lab analysis to regional synthesis by Lutz Schirrmeister, Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research, Periglacial Research Unit, Potsdam

 

The Department of Periglacial Research of the Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research is studying permafrost deposits as paleo-environmental archives. We have been working on this topic successfully with collaborators from Russia and North America for more than 20 years: Starting in the 1990’s in Siberia on Taymyr Peninsula, we continued with field studies further east along the Laptev Sea and East Siberian coasts, in Central Yakutia, as well as on the Chukotka Peninsula. In addition, in the early 2000’s we started field investigations of permafrost deposits in Alaska and Northwest Canada. 

In the beginning of my presentation I will provide a short introduction about our institute, especially the Periglacial Research unit, located in AWI’s Potsdam site near Berlin. Based on my almost 20 years’ experience in the periglacial department I will then focus on my own research field and projects. Starting with some visual impressions of field work in Siberia, I will show the conditions of sample collection and field measurements, and how these conditions have changed during the last two decades. Sampling of permafrost outcrops and cores as well as sampling of unfrozen active layer and lake sediments resulted in a broad range of sample materials from a diverse set of cryostratigraphies, which we used for different sedimentological, geochronological, hydrochemical, mineralogical, and paleoecolgoical studies in order to reconstruct periglacial paleoenvironments in our research area.

Using this multidisciplinary approach, we are able to reconstruct paleo-environmental conditions for the last 200.000 years at several Arctic sites. We use such windows into the past as an analogue to future warming, and reconstruction of the landscape for improved process understanding (e.g. soil, plants, geomorphology). Our focus is largely on the late Pleistocene and Holocene periods covering the last 50.000 years. During this period, large areas in northeastern Siberia, northern Alaska, and northwest Canada were not glaciated, including during the ice age. This region, including the Arctic shelf regions subaerially exposed during the late Pleistocene, is called Beringia. 

I will present results from our studies covering old pre-Eemian (Sangamon) permafrost with large ice wedges, which were partially thawed during the interglacial warming ca. 125.000 years ago. I was able to study ice wedge casts including interglacial lake deposits and flood plain sediments deposited during the early Weichselian (Wisconsinan), as well as ice-rich permafrost, called Yedoma (mid and late Wisconsian). Finally there was a great change in the landscape geomorphology and environmental conditions induced by the warming period at the late Pleistocene Holocene transition. This period in Beringia was marked by 

  • the extinction of the mammoth fauna and the connected tundra-steppe flora
  • the rise of the global sea level and the flooding of the Arctic shelves
  • the restructuring of the hydrological networks because of thawing of large Yedoma Ice Complex areas, and
  • the formation of the modern periglacial tundra landscapes with numerous thermokarst lakes and basins as well as thermo-erosional gullies.

Finally, I will give an outlook on current research and future work of our group at the Periglacial Research unit of AWI with a particular focus on permafrost organic carbon dynamics in the Yedoma region as well as modern ecological analogues to fossil bio-indicators.


To join by ZOOM: 
From a computer: https://cuboulder.zoom.us/j/5409618610
Or iPhone one-tap :
US: +16465588656,,5409618610#
Or Telephone, Dial(for higher quality, dial a number based on your current location):
US: 1-646-558-8656 
Meeting ID: 540 961 8610
International numbers available: https://cuboulder.zoom.us/zoomconference?m=n9ouFAK_Rco_IPQABq0Xs3hCfONRRvVt

date

Wednesday, October 25, 2017
11:00am to 12:00pm

location

East Campus, RL-2, Room 155

Event Type

NSIDC

contact

Mistia.Zuckerman@colorado.edu
2017-10-25
 
Science Communication Workshop for Grad Students

Science Communication Workshop for Grad Students

COMPASS Message Box Training

This workshop by COMPASS is intended for graduate students in geography/geology/biology/related departments and institutes who want to learn how to better communicate their science to different audiences.  If you are planning to attend, please RSVP to Chelsea Nagy (chelsea.nagy@colorado.edu) by Friday 10/20/17 with your name and department affiliation.  Please feel free to bring your own lunch to the event. 


This COMPASS science communication training will help participants share what they do, what they know - and most importantly, why it matters - in clear, lively terms. Grounded in the latest research on science communication, this training is designed to help participants find the relevance of their science for the audiences they most want to reach — journalists, policymakers, the public, and even other scientists.
Participants will be introduced to The Message Box- COMPASS' most fundamental tool no matter who you are preparing to communicate with. The Message Box is a powerful tool to help distill what you know and why it matters for your particular audience. There will be time for hands on practice with your peers, and an interactive exercise practicing your "elevator pitch” to explain to others what you do in 30 seconds.

date

Wednesday, October 25, 2017
12:00pm to 1:30pm

location

CIRES Auditorium

contact

Chelsea.Nagy@colorado.edu
2017-10-25
 
CSTPR Noontime Seminar

CSTPR Noontime Seminar

Climate and congress: The making of a citizen by Grant Couch, Citizen's Climate Lobby

This talk will be available via live webcast. To view the live webcast please go to Adobe Connect and login as a guest.

Grant Couch is the founder of the Conservative Caucus within Citizens Climate Lobby - a national, non-partisan group advocating for a national price on CO2 and other GhGs. Until he left full-time work Grant never gave “global warming” much thought. However after studying the issue he became convinced it is a critical reality that needs US leadership to create a solution. Today’s talk will cover his personal journey as a life-long, fiscal conservative who moved from  apathy to action on climate. Some of the issues to be covered include: Is there a meaningful solution - with a viable political path?  Is non-partisan citizen lobbying possible on such a politically polarized issue? How does Congress really work? What does it mean to be a citizen? 

Grant CouchBiography: Grant graduated from Lehigh University in 1971 with an MBA and a BS in Mechanical Engineering and worked in the financial services industry at a number of Wall Street firms.  He retired from full-time work in the financial industry in 2008 as the President & COO of Countrywide Securities Corp and moved to Boulder in 2008 to be the CEO of Louisville-based Sounds True until 2010.  He retired in 2015 as the Chairman of the Bank of Manhattan and Manhattan Bancorp.  Grant is currently a member of the investment committee of Aravaipa, a Colorado-based, impact technology VC fund and he serves on the Board of Zen Peacemakers International.  He is also a Zen teacher in the Hakuyu Taizan Maezumi lineage.

date

Wednesday, October 25, 2017
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

CSTPR Conference Room

resources

Event Type

CSTPR
2017-10-25
 
ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC Reading Room

date

Thursday, October 26, 2017
9:00am

location

ESOC Reading Room

contact

Ashley.Olson@colorado.edu
2017-10-26
 
CSTPR Open House

CSTPR Open House

This year we are celebrating our 15th anniversary of the Center for Science and Technology Policy Research and the 50th anniversary of the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences. As a part of our ongoing work, we are happy to invite you to attend our ‘Open House’ for alumni and friends of CSTPR on Friday October 27th from 3-5pm. We have arranged this in partnership with the CU Alumni Association’s 2017 Homecoming Weekend. This will be a relatively informal reception, and some time to mingle and catch up with current core faculty, staff as well as other alumni and friends of CSTPR.

Event is open to the public, but RSVP is encouraged.

If you’re able to join us, please RSVP to CSTPR Office Manager Jennifer Katzung, jennifer.katzung@colorado.edu.

date

Friday, October 27, 2017
3:00pm to 5:00pm

Event Type

CSTPR
2017-10-27
 
 
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Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Chemistry of peroxy radicals and soot formation at combustion conditions by Prof Sandeep Sharma, CU Boulder, PChem

Abstract:
"In this presentation, I will focus on the chemistry of peroxy radicals and soot formation at combustion conditions. Both these topics are of immense technological importance and will also allow me to present the latest theoretical techniques used to study them. These include the use of automated mechanism generators to build complex reaction mechanisms, the use of transition state theory to calculate rates of elementary reactions, and the use of the semiclassical method for calculating the partition function of anharmonic vibrational modes. The aim is to physically motivate these techniques and highlight the conditions under which we expect them to be predictive and also discuss their shortcomings. I will end the presentation with a short review of the latest work from my group that aims to address some of the shortcomings."
 

date

Monday, October 30, 2017
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

Ekeley S274

contact

Anne.Handschy@Colorado.EDU
2017-10-30
 
INSTAAR Noon Seminar

INSTAAR Noon Seminar

Laurentide ice sheets, the Isthmus of Panamá, & the Great American Biotic Interchange: A tectonic red herring inserted between climatic cause and biological consequence by Dr. Peter Molnar
Geological Sciences & CIRES, University of Colorado Boulder


Two events occurred virtually simultaneously at ~2.5 Ma: the first big ice sheet of Northern Hemisphere Ice Ages reached as far south as St. Louis, and largely large mammals crossed through the Isthmus of Panamá from North to South America and vice versa in the Great American Biotic Interchange.  An emergent isthmus is necessary for such animals to change hemispheres.  In a popular myth, recited by textbooks, the isthmus emerged near ~2.5 Ma or perhaps slightly earlier, and by doing so, it altered Atlantic Circulation sufficiently to enable ice sheets grow on Canada.  I contend that such logic is inverted. Large Laurentide ice sheets pushed the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ) southward so as to cool and aridify eastern Panamá, and create a savannah-like environment.  Most of the animals involved in the Great American Biotic Interchange seem to have been savannah-dwellers, and I presume that they would have avoided the swamps, jungles, snakes, crocodiles, mosquitoes, and other nasty predators in eastern Panamá before savannah-like environments drew them in and facilitated safe passage.  So, the Great American Biotic Interchange is not a symptom of a tectonic change that enabled Ice Ages, but instead a consequence of those Ice Ages.

 

Coffee and social hour @ 11:45 am. 

date

Monday, October 30, 2017
12:15pm

location

SEEC room S228 (Sievers Conference Room)
2017-10-30