Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences



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CSTPR Noontime Seminar

CSTPR Noontime Seminar

The socio-spatial dimensions of disaster risk in mobile home parks: Learning from the 2013 Colorado floods by Andrew Rumbach and Esther Sullivan, University of Colorado Denver

This talk will be available via live webcast. To view the live webcast please go to Adobe Connect and login as a guest.

Mobile home parks are an important source of affordable housing for millions of U.S. households. Mobile home parks are frequently exposed to floods, storms, and other natural hazards, so much that researchers use them as an indicator of vulnerability in the built environment. While numerous studies have documented the physical vulnerability of mobile home parks, disaster researchers have a limited understanding of the socio-spatial dimensions of risk in such communities. In this talk, we examine the unique contribution of mobile home parks to disaster risk through a detailed study of the 2013 Colorado floods. The floods destroyed over 450 mobile homes and permanently displaced thousands of people from their communities. Drawing on data collected through household surveys, semi-structured interviews with recovery officials, and observation of recovery planning meetings, we describe four socio-spatial dimensions of risk in mobile home parks: concentrated vulnerability, divided asset ownership, restrictive or exclusionary planning, and community bias. Our analysis reveals tensions between growth, housing affordability, and community resilience, an important consideration for community planners and disaster management officials. We conclude by describing policy and planning interventions that might mitigate risk and improve recovery outcomes for mobile home park residents and owners.

Andrew RumbachAndrew Rumbach is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Planning and Design at the University of Colorado Denver. His research centers on community risk and resilience to natural hazards and climate change, in the United States and India. He is especially interested in how planning and urban governance shapes the geographies of risk and resilience in cities. His current research projects include a longitudinal study of household and community recovery after the 2013 Colorado floods; an examination of the role of collaborative networks in protecting historic resources from environmental hazards; and a study of small cities and environmental risk in the Darjeeling-Sikkim region of eastern India. Rumbach holds a doctorate and a master’s degree in City and Regional Planning from Cornell University and a bachelor’s in Political Science from Reed College.

 

Esther Sullivan is an urban sociologist and Assistant Professor at the University of Colorado Denver. Her research focuses on poverty, spatial inequality, legal regulation, housing, and the built environment, with a special interest in both forced and voluntary residential mobility. Her research uses both ethnographic methods and geospatial (GIS) analysis. She holds a Ph.D. in Sociology from The University of Texas at Austin. Her current book project Manufactured Insecurity: Mobile Home Park Evictions and Americans' Tenuous Right to Place (August 2018, University of California Press) is a mixed-method look at the mass evictions that result when mobile home parks close. Living full time inside closing mobile home parks across Texas and Florida, the project examines the effects of forced relocation on individuals and communities, as well as the operation of markets that profit off the low-income housing found in mobile home parks.

date

Wednesday, November 1, 2017
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

CSTPR Conference Room

resources

Event Type

CSTPR
2017-11-01
 
HR Information Session

HR Information Session

The CIRES HR team will hold two information sessions to present the topics below and discuss general information relevant to CIRES research faculty, supervisors, science advisors, and federal partners:

  • E-time cards: We are moving to electronic time cards for student and temporary hourly employees. Thank you to those who have already made the e-switch! Click here for information about submitting and approving timesheets in MyLeave (requires sign in).
  • Promotion season: It's CIRES promotion season! You should have received an email earlier this month about the Career Track process. For more information (and a pdf copy of that October 11 note), please see this InsideCIRES page. Promotion packages are due December 8. 
  • Important survey: Please watch your mailbox for a CU Boulder Employee Engagement Survey coming in November. If enough of us fill out the survey, we will—for the first time—be able to see CIRES-specific results. We really want to hear from you; please complete the survey.
     

date

Wednesday, November 1, 2017
10:00am to 11:00am

location

DSRC GB124

contact

CIREShr@colorado.edu
2017-11-01
 
Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Was there a climate warming “Hiatus” in the Arctic? by Kang Wang, INSTAAR, University of Colorado Boulder

Abstract:

Historically, in situ measurements have been notoriously sparse over the Arctic. As a consequence, the existing gridded data of surface air temperature (SAT) may have large biases in estimating the warming trend in this region. Using data from an expanded monitoring network with 31 stations in the Alaskan Arctic, we demonstrate that the SAT has increased by 2.19°C in this region, or at a rate of 0.23°C/decade during 1921–2015. Meanwhile, we found that the SAT warmed at 0.71°C/decade over 1998–2015, which is 2 to 3 times faster than the rate established from the gridded data sets. Focusing on the “hiatus” period 1998–2012 as identified by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report, the SAT has increased at 0.45°C/decade, which captures more than 90% of the regional trend for 1951–2012. We suggest that sparse in situ measurements are responsible for underestimation of the SAT change in the gridded data sets. It is likely that enhanced climate warming may also have happened in the other regions of the Arctic since the late 1990s but left undetected because of incomplete observational coverage.

 

To join by ZOOM: 
From a computer: https://cuboulder.zoom.us/j/5409618610
Or iPhone one-tap :
US: +16465588656,,5409618610#
Or Telephone, Dial(for higher quality, dial a number based on your current location):
US: 1-646-558-8656 
Meeting ID: 540 961 8610
International numbers available: https://cuboulder.zoom.us/zoomconference?m=n9ouFAK_Rco_IPQABq0Xs3hCfONRRvVt

date

Wednesday, November 1, 2017
11:00am to 12:00pm

location

East Campus, RL-2, Room 155

Event Type

NSIDC

contact

Mistia.Zuckerman@colorado.edu
2017-11-01
 
ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC Reading Room

date

Thursday, November 2, 2017
9:00am to 10:00am

contact

Ashley.Olson@colorado.edu
2017-11-02
 
HR Information Session

HR Information Session

The CIRES HR team will hold two information sessions to present the topics below and discuss general information relevant to CIRES research faculty, supervisors, science advisors, and federal partners:

  • E-time cards: We are moving to electronic time cards for student and temporary hourly employees. Thank you to those who have already made the e-switch! Click here for information about submitting and approving timesheets in MyLeave (requires sign in).
  • Promotion season: It's CIRES promotion season! You should have received an email earlier this month about the Career Track process. For more information (and a pdf copy of that October 11 note), please see this InsideCIRES page. Promotion packages are due December 8. 
  • Important survey: Please watch your mailbox for a CU Boulder Employee Engagement Survey coming in November. If enough of us fill out the survey, we will—for the first time—be able to see CIRES-specific results. We really want to hear from you; please complete the survey.
     

date

Thursday, November 2, 2017
2:00pm to 3:00pm

location

CIRES Auditorium

contact

CIREShr@colorado.edu
2017-11-02
 
Distinguished Lecture Series: Dr. John J. Clague

Distinguished Lecture Series: Dr. John J. Clague

Title: (Danger from the sea – Sea-level rise in a changing climate)

Abstract: The rise in ocean levels is among the most dangerous of the many secondary effects of near-future climate warming. On a global scale, sea level is currently rising at an average rate of about 3.5 mm/yr; this rate is nearly 50% higher than rates during the first half of the past century. Sea-level rise has been driven by a nearly 1oC rise in average Earth surface temperature since the early 1900s and, more specifically, has resulted from the loss of alpine glacier ice cover and thermal expansion of ocean waters. A further minimum 1oC rise in average global temperature is ‘locked in’, perhaps before the middle of this century. Continuing warming will ensure that the sea surface will continue to rise, likely reaching an average level nearly 1 m higher than today by the end of the century. This rate of sea-level rise is without precedent in the Holocene and matches some of the highest rates of the Pleistocene Epoch.

Recently, a group of respected climate scientists argued that IPCC has underestimated the amount of sea-level rise by the end of this century due to as yet poorly understood contributions of water from Greenland and Antarctica. Uncertainties in future rates and magnitudes of sea-level rise stem largely from two sources – future anthropogenic carbon emissions and poor knowledge of how rapidly Earth’s cryosphere will equilibrate to the warmer climate we face. Projected costs of protecting existing low-lying coastal infrastructure from higher seas could amount to hundreds of trillions of dollars. However, even with a massive effort, traditional engineering measures, mainly sea dykes, will be effective only for 1-2 m of sea-level rise. Displacement of hundreds of millions of people from low-lying coastal areas, with attendant social disruption and strife, will accompany sea-level rise more than 2 m.

Bio: John Clague is Emeritus Professor at Simon Fraser University. He was educated at Occidental College (BA), the University of California Berkeley (MA), and the University of British Columbia (PhD). Clague worked as a Research Scientist with the Geological Survey of Canada from 1975 until 1998. In 1998 he accepted a faculty position in Department of Earth Sciences at Simon Fraser University. He is currently Director of the Centre for Natural Hazard Research at SFU. Clague is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, former President of the Geological Association of Canada, and Past-President of the International Union for Quaternary Research and the Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of British Columbia (APEGBC). He is recipient of the Geological Society of America Burwell Award, the Royal Society of Canada Bancroft Award, APEGBC’s Innovation Editorial Board Award, the Geological Association of Canada’s (GAC) E.R.W Neale Medal, and GAC’s Logan Medal and Ambrose Medal. He was the 2007-2008 Richard Jahns Distinguished Lecturer for the Geological Society of America and Association of Environmental and Engineering Geology and received an Honorary PhD from the University of Waterloo in 2017.

 

date

Friday, November 3, 2017
3:00pm

location

CIRES Auditorium, Room 338

resources

Event Type

DLS

Amenities

Refreshments provided

2017-11-03
 
 
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State Representative Event

State Representative Event

Join us for a science policy discussion over coffee with Senator Steve Fenberg and Representative Edie Hooton to learn what the best way to interface with policy makers is.

date

Tuesday, November 7, 2017
3:00pm to 4:00pm

Event Type

CGA
2017-11-07
 
CGA Career Panel

CGA Career Panel

Interested in careers outside of academia? Need advice on how to be competitive for your dream job after graduation? Join CGA for a discussion with a distinguished guest panel who will share valuable insights about alternative careers outside academia, including: non-profit, government, and industry. Learn about the panelists' paths to their careers, tips for gaining access to these positions, and bring lots of questions!

Refreshments will be provided!

Guest panelists:
Sheldon Drobot, Harris Technologies
Heidi Sherk, The Nature Conservancy
Benét Duncan, Western Water Assessment
Joel Smith, ABT Consulting
Amber Ortega, Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment

date

Wednesday, November 8, 2017
5:00pm to 6:30pm

Event Type

CGA
2017-11-08
 
Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

"The Unraveling Arctic: Science, Communications and Policy" by Rafe Pomerance, Chairman Arctic 21.

Abstract:

Greenland and Arctic glaciers are shrinking. Sea ice and spring snow cover are in decline.  Permafrost is thawing. These trends amount to the unraveling of the Arctic.  In response, Arctic 21 was established as a network of non governmental organizations, scientists and research institutions  with two goals: #1 to communicate the ongoing unraveling; #2 to establish a policy framework to increase the likelihood of an appropriate response by governments both in the Arctic and globally.   Crucial to this effort was to convince the Obama State Department to make climate change in the Arctic a focus of the US Chairmanship of the Arctic Council and to describe the global consequences of climate change the Arctic.  Arctic 21 was then able to pursue a framework for policy by asking the question, “What is the Arctic we have to have to sustain the global climate system?”.  At this point several multilateral governmental institutions will have to face the unraveling, including the Arctic Council,  the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, and the Conference of the Parties of the Paris Agreement.

date

Wednesday, November 8, 2017
11:00am to 12:00pm

location

East Campus, RL-2, Room 155

contact

Mistia.Zuckerman@colorado.edu
2017-11-08
 
ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC Reading Room

date

Thursday, November 9, 2017
9:00am to 10:00am

location

ESOC Reading Room

contact

Ashley.Olson@colorado.edu
2017-11-09
 
Ball Aerospace Guest Lecture

Ball Aerospace Guest Lecture

Earth Sciences at Ball Aerospace – Where We’ve Been and Where We’re Going by Dr. Shelley Petroy, Ball Aerospace, Earth Science Mission Development
 
Since the 1950’s, Ball Aerospace has engineered some of the world’s pioneering earth and space science missions. When climatologists need more accurate data and weather forecasters want to predict days in advance, we’re their go-to partner. Flying on our spacecraft, instruments like TEMPO, GMI and CALIPSO gather extremely accurate data on pollution, precipitation and the impacts of clouds and aerosols on Earth’s climate. Today, coupled with breakthrough technologies, shrinking spacecraft size, increased access to space, and the growing commercial data market, Ball is moving into “new space” with a suite of small sensors, spacecraft and enabling technologies that maintain mission performance, but take advantage of these new market drivers to reduce costs and lower risk. Come find out where we’ve been and where we’re going in earth sciences

Lecture from 9:00am to 10:am in the CIRES Auditorium, followed by informal discussion in the ESOC Reading Room from 10:00am to 11:00am.

date

Friday, November 10, 2017
9:00am to 11:00am

location

CIRES Auditorium and ESOC Reading Room

contact

tminear@colorado.edu
2017-11-10
 
 
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November 2017 CMC Meeting

November 2017 CMC Meeting

date

Monday, November 13, 2017
12:00pm to 2:00pm

location

Amenities

Lunch provided

2017-11-13
 
Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Optimization of Surface-Initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization for Application to Small Analyte Detection by Nathan Reed, CU Boulder, ANYL 1st year
"The research project I contributed to as an undergraduate student sought to investigate molecular transport as a means of signal enhancement in small analyte detection. Selective transport of analyte molecules to a nanosensor location will lower the limit of detection compared to analyte collection from free diffusion alone. Polymer brushes can be grown off a detector surface directly and can then be used to bring small molecules closer in proximity to the detector. The small molecules will selectively partition into the polymer-brush surface based on attractions caused by hydrophobic effects, hydrogen bonding, or ionic interactions. To foster such controlled and specific interactions on a device surface, uniform polymer thin films needed to be synthesized and the appropriate materials used for transport of target analytes needed to be understood. Additionally, there was a need for the method to be standardized so that non-polymer scientists and engineers could replicate it with ease. Atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) presented a polymerization technique able meet these needs. ATRP is a controlled polymerization technique whose parameters may be tuned to meet specific needs such as functionality and length. In addition, ATRP is an approachable technique to scientists unfamiliar with polymerization techniques once synthetic methods are unified and optimized. My undergraduate research has investigated ATRP reaction conditions applicable to a broad range of polymer types, both in solution and surface-tethered, to develop a unified and optimized synthetic approach."


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Global simulation of brown carbon and single scattering albedo calculation using a chemical transport model by Duseong Jo, CU Boulder, Postdoc
"Recent observations suggest that a certain fraction of organic carbon (OC) aerosol effectively absorbs solar radiation, which is also known as brown carbon (BrC) aerosol. Despite much observational evidence of its presence, very few global modeling studies have been conducted because of poor understanding of global BrC emissions. I will present an explicit global simulation of BrC in a global 3-D chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem), including global BrC emission estimates from primary (biomass burning and biofuel) and secondary sources. The BrC absorption leads to a general reduction of NO2 photolysis rates, whose maximum decreases occur in Asia up to 9% (19%) on an annual (spring) mean basis. The inclusion of BrC absorption reduces the overestimation of single scattering albedo (SSA) in the model, but still the model overestimates the observed SSA by AERONET. To further reduce the overestimation, the sensitivity calculations of SSA are conducted by focusing on the physical properties of Black Carbon (BC), the inclusion of Brown Carbon (BrC), and the size distribution of dust. Large variations in the calculated SSA may result from slight changes of the geometric mean radius, geometric standard deviation, real and imaginary refractive indices, and density of BC. The inclusion of BrC and observationally-constrained dust size distributions also significantly affect the SSA, and result in a remarkable improvement for the simulated SSA at 440 compared with the AERONET observations."
 

date

Monday, November 13, 2017
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

Ekeley S274

Event Type

Seminar
2017-11-13
 
 
Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar to Study Permafrost Dynamics by Kevin Schaefer, Permafrost Scientist,  NSIDC 

Abstract:

We measure ground subsidence using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) to study permafrost dynamics.  Permafrost is perennially frozen ground and the active layer is the surface layer of soil that thaws in summer and refreezes in winter.  Permafrost is difficult to monitor using visible remote sensing because it occurs underground.  However, we use InSAR to measure seasonal subsidence resulting from the expansion of soil water into ice as the active layer freezes and thaws each year.  We use the seasonal subsidence to directly measure the Active Layer Thickness (ALT), a key parameter of permafrost stability.  We use Ground Penetrating radar to gather in situ measurements of ALT for validation.  We use the subsidence trends to identify thermokarst features, and important processes, such as the impacts of fire on permafrost.  We use the loss of coherence to measure fire severity.  We combine InSAR with backscatter measurements of soil moisture as part of NASA’s Arctic-Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) field campaign in Alaska and northwest.  Our InSAR techniques can lift the veil to peer under the surface to study permafrost dynamics.
To join by ZOOM: 
From a computer: https://cuboulder.zoom.us/j/5409618610
Or iPhone one-tap :
US: +16465588656,,5409618610#
Or Telephone, Dial(for higher quality, dial a number based on your current location):
US: 1-646-558-8656 
Meeting ID: 540 961 8610
International numbers available: https://cuboulder.zoom.us/zoomconference?m=n9ouFAK_Rco_IPQABq0Xs3hCfONRRvVt

date

Wednesday, November 15, 2017
11:00am to 12:00pm

location

East Campus, RL-2, Room 155

contact

Mistia.Zuckerman@colorado.edu
2017-11-15
 
CIRES' IRP Poster Session and Reception

CIRES' IRP Poster Session and Reception

The reception will feature the research results of the 2016 IRP winners, listed below. Light refreshments and beverages will be served.

The Innovative Research Program (IRP) is an internal CIRES competition designed to stimulate a creative research environment within CIRES and to encourage synergy between disciplines and research colleagues. The program encourages novel, unconventional or fundamental research that might otherwise be difficult to fund. CIRES-wide competitions are conducted each year to foster an innovative research environment where risk taking is allowed and even encouraged.

IRP Recipients:
 
Discerning heat from melt from composition in the deep earth: Exploring a new approach to measuring seismic attenuation
Investigator: Craig Jones
 

Is melt water responsible for new crevasses in Greenland’s interior?
Investigators: Lora Koenig and Michael MacFerrin
 

Heterogeneous Photo-Initiated Chemistry of Alkyl Organics in the Earth’s Atmosphere
Investigator: Veronica Vaida
 

Are there diamonds in the sky? Detection of diamondoid and other large hydrocarbons in the atmosphere
Investigators: Carsten Warneke, Joost de Gouw, Brian Lerner, and Abigail Koss
 

HOVERCAT: A Novel Aerial System to Evaluate Aerosol Chemistry and its Impacts on Arctic Clouds
Investigators: Jessie Creamean and Margaret Tolbert
 
Demonstration of a high-signal soft-ionization quantitative method for online aerosol mass spectrometry
Investigator: Jose-Luiz Jimenez
 
Investigating the Ionospheric Gravity and Pressure Gradient Current Systems with Satellite Magnetic Measurements
Investigator: Henry Patrick Alken

date

Thursday, November 16, 2017
4:30pm

location

CIRES Atrium

Amenities

Refreshments provided

contact

linda.pendergrass@colorado.edu
2017-11-16
 
ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC Reading Room

date

Thursday, November 16, 2017
9:00am to 10:00am

contact

Ashley.Olson@colorado.edu
2017-11-16
 
 
 
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CSTPR Noontime Seminar

CSTPR Noontime Seminar

AAAS "Catalyzing Advocacy in Science and Engineering" workshop student competition panel discussion

Past competition winners, Adalyn Fyhrie, Carrie Havrilla, Angela Boag, and Nicholas Valcourt
Moderator: Heather Bené, University of Colorado Office of Government Relations

This talk will be available via live webcast. To view the live webcast please go to Adobe Connect and login as a guest.

date

Wednesday, November 29, 2017
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

CSTPR Conference Room

resources

Event Type

CSTPR
2017-11-29