News Release Archives

 

2014

New report highlights how climate change may affect water in Colorado

As Colorado’s climate continues to warm, those who manage or use water in the state will likely face significant changes in water supply and demand, according to a new report on state climate change released today by the Western Water Assessment and the Colorado Water Conservation Board. Read More ...

Science of Smog

Every summer along Colorado’s Front Range, ozone pollution periodically spikes to unhealthy levels, despite federal and state efforts to control the lung-damaging chemical. Cars are running cleaner, and power plants are emitting fewer pollutants, so why does ozone still regularly soar above health-based limits? Read More ...

Reporters using more 'hedging' words in climate change articles, CIRES study finds

The amount of “hedging” language—words that suggest room for doubt—used by prominent newspapers in articles about climate change has increased over time, according to a new study by the University of Colorado Boulder. Read More ...

Airborne measurements confirm leaks from oil and gas operations

During two days of intensive airborne measurements, oil and gas operations in Colorado’s Front Range leaked nearly three times as much methane, a greenhouse gas, as predicted based on inventory estimates, and seven times as much benzene, a regulated air toxic. Read More ...

Greenhouse gases continued rising in 2013; 34 percent increase since 1990

NOAA’s latest Annual Greenhouse Gas Index (AGGI), released today, Friday, May 2, 2014, shows that the warming influence from human-emitted gases continues to increase. This trend that began with the Industrial Revolution of the 1880s has accelerated in recent decades. Read More ...

Common factors behind Greenland melt episodes in 2012, 1889

In 2012, temperatures at the summit of Greenland rose above freezing for the first time since 1889, raising questions about what led to the unusual melt episode. Now, a new CIRES-led analysis shows that some of the same weather and climate factors were at play in both 1889 and 2012: heat waves thousands of miles upwind in North America, higher-than-average ocean surface temperatures south of Greenland and atmospheric rivers of warm, moist air that streamed toward Greenland’s west coast. Read More ...

Climate considerations on Navajo lands

A new report led by the University of Colorado Boulder, Considerations for Climate Change and Variability Adaptation on the Navajo Nation, synthesizes state-of-the-science information on the region’s climate, water cycle and ecology. It goes much further... Read More ...

Serving up climate data in usable formats

When a city’s transportation infrastructure needs work, city planners can’t just look at yesterday’s traffic figures, they need to take into account long-term trends: How are driving patterns changing? Roads and mass transit projects last for decades, after all. Read More ...

Measuring wind with microphones

To a small group of physicists, the noisy nuisance of the Diagonal Highway, between Boulder and Longmont proved inspirational. The group used the roar of traffic to accurately measure wind speed, a scientific first. Read More ...

Amazonian drought conditions add carbon dioxide to the atmosphere

As climates change, the lush tropical ecosystems of the Amazon Basin may release more of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide into the atmosphere than they absorb, according to a new study published Feb. 6 in Nature. Read More ...

Sequencing butterfly bacteria, scientists find surprises

A team led by the University of Colorado Boulder has sequenced the internal bacterial makeup of the three major life stages of a butterfly species, a project that showed some surprising events occur during metamorphosis. Read More ...

CIRES Fellow awarded science prize from Royal Swedish Academy

CIRES geophysicist Peter Molnar has has been awarded the prestigious 2014 Crafoord Prize in Geosciences by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences for his groundbreaking research in geophysics and geological sciences. Read More ...

New study: U.S. power plant emissions down

Scientists recently recorded the lowest temperatures on Earth at a desolate and remote ice plateau in East Antarctica, trumping a record set in 1983 and uncovering a new puzzle about the ice-covered continent. Read More ...