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CIRES | Education and Outreach

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The pattern of uneven sea level rise over the last quarter century has been driven in part by human-caused climate change, not just natural variability, according to a new study.

Findings could help improve regional sea level forecasts
Monday, December 3, 2018
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In August 2012, in the frigid wilderness of West Greenland, the Jakobshavn Glacier was flowing and breaking off into the sea at record speeds, three times faster than in previous years. An underwater calving event had caused the massive glacier to lose its footing. But the movement was not linear like a runaway train (as previous studies suggested), but dynamic: drastically speeding up, then slowing down after a few days.

Detailed observations of Greenland’s Jakobshavn Isbræ help explain dynamic tidewater glacier speedup and slowdown
Thursday, November 29, 2018
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New research published in The Lancet medical journal last night shows that rising temperatures as a result of climate change are already exposing us to an unacceptably high health risk and warns, for the first time, that older people in Europe and the East Mediterranean are particularly vulnerable to extremes of heat, markedly higher than in Africa and SE Asia.

Research from 27 global institutions including CU Boulder show extreme heat damages health and livelihood and may overwhelm hospitals
Wednesday, November 28, 2018
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Antarctica is high and dry and mostly bitterly cold, and it’s easy to think of its ice and snow as locked away in a freezer, protected from melt except around its low-lying coasts and floating ice shelves. But that view may be wrong.

In a new perspective, CU Boulder and other scientists urge more attention to Antarctica’s melting surface ice
Tuesday, November 20, 2018

Antarctica image by NASA

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New research on wind behavior in complex terrain will improve forecasts for wind energy firms by 15-25 percent, and has already led to improved wind forecasts for the entire country, according to a 4-year study funded by NOAA and the U.S. Department of Energy. 

NOAA-DOE study examined the physics of wind in complex terrain
Tuesday, November 20, 2018

CIRES scientists Joe Olson, Jaymes Kenyon, Terra Ladwig, Eric James, Irina Djalalova, Laura Bianco, Katie McCaffrey, Yelena Pichugina, Aditya Choukulkar, Tim Bonin, Brandi McCarty, Kathy Lantz, and Chuck Long participated in WFIP2.


Banner photo: Steve Wilson/ Wikimedia Commons

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Middle School Film Screening

Join CIRES Education & Outreach Friday, November 16 for a film screening of short community environmental action movies produced by 6th, 7th and 8th graders from Platt Choice Middle School. They completed a project to explore climate/environmental actions through filmmaking, a partnership between CIRES E&O and Boulder Valley School District.

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As global temperatures climb, warmer winters in parts of the country may set the scene for higher rates of violent crimes such as assault and robbery, according to a new CIRES study published in AGU's journal GeoHealth.

CU Boulder study uncovers surprisingly strong link between climate and U.S. crime rates
Tuesday, November 13, 2018
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The day after Halloween, something scary may still lurk—inside your showerhead. Researchers at CIRES have identified Mycobacterium as the most abundant genus of bacteria growing in the slimy “biofilm” that lines the inside of residential showerheads—and some of those bacteria can cause lung disease.

CU Boulder citizen-science study reveals lung-disease causing strains of bacteria especially common in certain environments
Thursday, November 1, 2018
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Peer-review of digital educational resources—A rigorous review process developed by the Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN).

Gold, A.U., Ledley, T.S., Buhr, S.M., Fox, S., McCaffrey, M., Niepold, F., Manduca, C. & Lynds, S. 2012. Peer-review of digital educational resources—A rigorous review process developed by the Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN). Journal of Geoscience Education. 60: 295-308.


CIRES sponsors a prestigious Visiting Fellows program, inviting scientists to join the thriving community of researchers in Boulder, Colorado. CIRES Visiting Fellowships are intended to stimulate interdisciplinary research across the institute through engagement with CIRES researchers on campus and in Boulder’s NOAA Laboratories. Sponsored by CIRES Fellows, Visiting Fellows work with CIRES researchers on a wide range of environmental science topics.

Looking for a postdoctoral or sabbatical research opportunity?
Friday, October 26, 2018
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