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CIRES | Education and Outreach

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Sea ice over the Arctic Ocean likely reached its maximum extent for the year, at 14.48 million square kilometers (5.59 million square miles) March 17, the second lowest in the 39-year satellite record, falling just behind 2017. This year’s maximum extent is 1.16 million square kilometers (448,000 square miles) below the 1981 to 2010 average maximum of 15.64 million square kilometers (6.04 million square miles).

Friday, March 23, 2018
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A new field instrument developed by a collaborative team of researchers can quantify methane leaks as tiny as 1/4 of a human exhalation from nearly a mile away. CIRES, NOAA, CU Boulder, and NIST scientists revamped and “ruggedized” Nobel Prize laser technology—turning a complex, room-sized collection of instruments into a sleek, 19-inch portable unit to tote into the field near oil and gas operations. The instrument collects precise, nonstop data, providing game-changing information critical for safe industry operations and controlling harmful greenhouse gas emissions.

University of Colorado, CIRES, NOAA and NIST team harnesses Nobel Prize technology to detect distant gas leaks
Friday, March 23, 2018
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It could be said that Earth’s oceans are the final frontier in exploration. More than 80 percent of the world's oceans remain unexplored and unmapped. Human activities in our oceans continue to increase, and scientists from around the globe have come together to make mapping the entire ocean a reality by 2030. To aid in this endeavor, scientists from NCEI and other institutions have developed an algorithm that will play a significant role in cultivating a seabed mapping strategy for the North Atlantic Ocean and beyond.

Wednesday, March 21, 2018
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When the Sun flared dramatically last September, causing geomagnetic storms and radio blackouts on Earth, a new NOAA solar telescope captured the drama from a different perspective. Now, NOAA has released these new images to the scientific community—images that scientists from CIRES and NCEI have played a key role in capturing.

NOAA solar telescope improves understanding of space weather, for better models and forecasts
Wednesday, March 7, 2018
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Global sea level rise is not cruising along at a steady 3 mm per year, it’s accelerating a little every year, like a driver merging onto a highway, according to a powerful new assessment led by CIRES Fellow Steve Nerem. He and his colleagues harnessed 25 years of satellite data to calculate that the rate is increasing by about 0.08 mm/year every year—which could mean an annual rate of sea level rise of 10 mm/year, or even more, by 2100.

A research team led by CIRES’ Steve Nerem detects an acceleration in the 25-year satellite sea level record
Monday, February 12, 2018

Banner image: North Carolina beach, 2017. Courtesy of Elisa Nebolsine.

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Chemical products that contain compounds refined from petroleum, like household cleaners, pesticides, paints and perfumes, now rival motor vehicle-related emissions as the top source of urban air pollution, according to a surprising NOAA-led study. People use a lot more fuel than they do petroleum-based compounds in chemical products—about 15 times more by weight, according to the new assessment. Even so, lotions, paints and other products contribute about as much to air pollution as the transportation sector does, said lead author Brian McDonald, a CIRES scientist working in NOAA’s Chemical Sciences Division.

New study finds surprisingly high contribution from paints, pesticides, perfumes as vehicle emissions drop
Thursday, February 15, 2018

Authors of “Volatile Chemical Products Emerging as Largest Petrochemical Source of Urban Organic Emissions,” published in Science, are: Brian C. McDonald (CIRES and NOAA Chemical Sciences Division), Joost A. de Gouw (CIRES and NOAA Chemical Sciences Division), Jessica B. Gilman (NOAA Chemical Sciences Division), Shantanu H. Jathar (Colorado State University and University of California Davis), Ali Akherati (Colorado State University), Christopher D. Cappa (University of California Davis), Jose L. Jimenez (CIRES and CU Boulder), Julia Lee-Taylor (CIRES and NCAR), Patrick L. Hayes (Universite of Montreal), Stuart A. McKeen (CIRES and NOAA Chemical Sciences Division), Yu Yan Cui (CIRES and NOAA Chemical Sciences Division), Si-Wan Kim (CIRES and NOAA Chemical Sciences Division), Drew R. Gentner (Yale University), Gabriel Isaacman (NCAR), Van Wertz (Virginia Tech), Allen H. Goldstein (University of California-Berkeley), Robert A. Harley (University of California-Berkeley), Gregory J. Frost (NOAA Chemical Sciences Division), James M. Roberts (NOAA Chemical Sciences Division), Thomas B. Ryerson (NOAA Chemical Sciences Division), Michael Trainer (NOAA Chemical Sciences Division).

This research was supported by NOAA, the CIRES Visiting Fellowship Program, Aerodyne Research, Inc, the National Science Foundation and the Sloan Foundation.

Banner image: Los Angeles, Griffith Observatory and air pollution. A new study reports that emissions from common household and industrial products including perfumes, pesticides and paints now rival motor vehicle emissions as the top source of urban air pollution. Photo: Wikimedia/David Iliff, CC-by-SA 3.0

 

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Although ozone pollution is dropping across many parts of the United States, western Europe and Japan, many people living in those countries still experience more than a dozen days every year in which levels of the lung irritant exceed health-based standards.

Monday, February 5, 2018

This story is based on stories from NOAA and the University of Leicester.

Image: Poor air quality in Tokyo, Japan in 2009. Since then ozone levels have improved, according to a new global assessment.

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Say you're developing a training program for submarine pilots. You want an underwater scene that's realistic so that their training is meaningful. NOAA's got those data, thanks to a team of CIRES and federal employees ironically located in the landlocked state of Colorado. These scientists, working as part of NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI), develop high-resolution, three-dimensional coastal maps, or digital elevation models (DEMs).

NOAA-based team makes 3-D coastal models for underwater navigation, emergency management, science exhibits, and more
Friday, February 16, 2018
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