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Engaged Scientist Series

Engaged Scientist Series

 

As communities increasingly grapple with problems of resiliency and environmental health and safety, scientists who are equipped to help are needed. The Engaged Scientist project was a series of free public talks and associated workshops for graduate students and postdoctoral researchers. These events helped to equip scientists with community engagement skills.

Click on the above links to access the archived resources from each of the Engaged Scientist Series events, which provide a source of knowledge and continuted support towards building relationships between scientific research and community engagment.

The Engaged Scientist series is coordinated by CU's new Albert A. Bartlett Center for Science Communication, CIRES Education and Outreach, INSTAAR, and Learn More About Climate at the Office for Outreach and Engagement.

 

Engaged Scientist Event 1 Resources

Bringing Science to the table - Stories, tips, and lessons-learned from working with communities

 

The Engaged Scientist Series kicked off on October 20, 2016 with a public lecture presented in the CIRES Auditorium and a workshop for graduate students and postdocs hosted in the CIRES Fellows Room on the CU Boulder main campus.

Public lecture: Dr. Rajul Pandya, Director of Thriving Earth Exchange (American Geophysical Union) presented case studies and stories to explore the elements of successful partnerships. There are lots of places where scientists, community leaders, and community members are working together to use science – including Earth and environmental science -  to build a better future. Whether it is to improving vaccination strategies in Ghana, building a flood-resistant town-hall in Georgia, or looking for dangerous chemicals leaking into Denver basements, we’ve seen lots of examples of community science partnerships that encourage resilience and support environmental justice. The best of these partnerships advance community priorities, connect research to on-the-ground impact, introduce new ideas and people to science, and introduce scientists to new questions and new ways of thinking.  In short – the best partnerships help science become more included and inclusive.

Workshop: After the lecture, a workshop for graduate students and postdoctoral researchers on developing strong scientist/community partnerships was co-led by Dr. Pandya, Susan Sullivan, Director of CIRES Education Outreach, and Ben Kirshner, Director of CU Engage. Workshop leaders and participants talked, frankly, about some of the risks and costs of partnership - for both scientists and communities – and explored some strategies to mitigate those risks and minimize those costs while building the capacity and inspiration for this imporant work.

 

The Engaged Scientist series is coordinated by CU's new Albert A. Bartlett Center for Science Communication, CIRES Education and Outreach, INSTAAR, and Learn More About Climate at the Office for Outreach and Engagement.

 

Engaged Scientist Event 2 Resources

Uses and Practices of Community Dialogue in Geosciences and Environmental Sciences

The second event in the Engaged Scientist series was held on January 19, 2017 in the Sustainability Innovation Lab at Colorado (SILC) at the Sustainability, Energy, and Environment Complex on the CU Boulder east campus.

Public lecture: Fostering community dialogue presented by Boulder Talks director Phaedra Pezzullo and co-director Leah Sprain of the Department of Communication at the Univesity of Colorado Boulder 

Workshop: Drs. Pezzullo and Sprain co-led the associated workshop for graduate students and postdocs after the lecture.

During this workshop participants:

  • Discussed the possibilities and limitations around science, communication and democracy
  • Analyzed real world transcripts of scientists communicating during community dialogues
  • Practiced framing your research with feedback to help you move towards your goals

 

The Engaged Scientist series is coordinated by CU's new Albert A. Bartlett Center for Science Communication, CIRES Education and Outreach, INSTAAR, and Learn More About Climate at the Office for Outreach and Engagement.

Science is Culture:  Understanding Power and Privilege in Community-Based Research

 

The final event in the Engaged Scientist Series was held on April 6, 2017. The public lecture was presented in the CIRES Auditorium and the workshop for graduate students and postdocs was hosted in the CIRES Fellows Room on the CU Boulder main campus.

Public lecture: ​Michelle Gabrieloff-Parish, Energy & Climate Justice Program Manager at the CU Boulder Environmental Center, and Heidi McCann, Associate Scientist at the National Snow and Ice Data Center gave a presentaion that focused on  how scientists often work in and with communities whether working on research, promoting findings especially in the fields of resiliency, environment and sustainability.

Workshop: The workshop examined the scientific worldview lens and explores best practices for working with communities, including developing inter-cultural awareness, conducting research so that communities benefit, and understanding the value of local communities (including disenfranchised communities) and “informal” knowledge.  Dr. Gabrieloff-Parish and Ms. McCann co-led the workshop following the public lecture.

During this workshop particiapnts:

  • Looked at relevant, mini case-studies 
  • Looked at cultural communication and behavior patterns
  • Worked through equity and justice dilemmas for community-engaged research 
  • Discussed how to initiate and strengthen community partnerships