Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado Boulder

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CSTPR Noontime Seminar

CSTPR Noontime Seminar

Climate change scientists as policy advocates?: Navigating the tensions between scientific independence, poor policy, and avoiding a dangerous world
by Lydia Messling, Leverhulme Trust Doctoral Scholar, University of Reading

This talk will be available via live webcast. To view the live webcast please go to Adobe Connect and login as a guest.

Lydia Lydia Messling's research is exploring how climate change researchers should engage in advocacy, if at all, when communicating with policy makers and the lay public. The work she does is interdisciplinary (borrowing from political theory, social science, ethics, psychology and sometimes a few others) and combines political theory with empirical qualitative research. In this talk, Lydia will set out where she thinks the key tensions lie when climate change scientists communicate with other non-experts through the lens of different communication roles that they can take. She will also share some of the early findings from her empirical research where scientists have described practical ways in which they navigate and manage those tensions. 

Lydia is a Leverhulme Trust Doctoral Scholar in Climate Justice, and is based at the University of Reading, U.K. Her research is exploring how climate change researchers should engage in advocacy, if at all, when communicating with policy makers and the lay public. Lydia's project uses both political theory and empirical research to examine the frames and methods of communication that researchers use to explain their findings to non-experts, and how they navigate communicating uncertainties whilst providing useful information for policy makers. It is widely valued that science should be politically neutral, independent and objective. Advocacy has the potential to undermine public trust and damage the scientific integrity of scientists' work by being at odds with these values. However climate change is an issue that requires urgent action. The stakes are high, the risks and uncertainties are difficult to comprehend, and advocacy for coordinated social action is vital. But should climate change researchers engage in this advocacy? Or is this outside of their remit?

date

Wednesday, October 24, 2018
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

CSTPR Conference Room

Event Type

CSTPR

resources

2018-10-24
 
Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

From the Arctic to the Antarctic (and the Andes in between): a latitudinal study of light absorbing impurities in snow in 2018 by Dr. Alia Khan, Postdoctoral Research Associate at NSIDC

ABSTRACT:  Deposition of light absorbing aerosols in the cryosphere, such as black carbon (BC), reduce surface albedo and enhance melt. The radiative forcing attributable to BC deposition in the cryosphere is currently reported with 90% uncertainty bounds and it is not currently possible to detect BC in snow via satellite remote sensing.  Therefore, ground observations of BC concentrations in surface snow and ice remain the primary pathway to further refine our understanding of the impacts of BC on the cryosphere.  Rather than an in-depth science talk, this presentation will be a broad recap of science objectives and a photo slideshow of fieldwork across a large latitudinal gradient in 2018 including snow sampling and spectral albedo measurements from King George Island in Antarctica, Arctic Sea Ice (via the KOPRI-ARAON) and Svalbard in the Arctic, and volcanos and national parks in the Chilean Andes.

TO JOIN BY ZOOM:
From a computer: https://cuboulder.zoom.us/j/5409618610  
Or iPhone one-tap :
    US: +16465588656,,5409618610#  
Or Telephone:
    Dial(for higher quality, dial a number based on your current location): 
        US: +1 646 558 8656  
    Meeting ID: 540 961 8610

date

Wednesday, October 24, 2018
11:00am to 12:00pm
MST

location

NSIDC, RL-2, Room 155/153

Event Type

NSIDC

contact

Mistia Zuckerman

2018-10-24
 
ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC Weekly Coffee

date

Wednesday, October 24, 2018
9:00am

location

Ekeley W230

contact

Ashley.Olson@colorado.edu
2018-10-24