Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado Boulder

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IRP Proposals Accepted February 11 - March 25

IRP Proposals Accepted February 11 - March 25

The CIRES Innovative Research Program will begin accepting applications February 11; all materials are due March 25 through this InsideCIRES link.

The IRP is designed to stimulate a creative research environment within CIRES and to encourage synergy between disciplines and research colleagues. The intent is to support small research efforts that can quickly provide concept viability or rule out further consideration. The program encourages novel, unconventional or fundamental research that might otherwise be difficult to fund. Funded projects are inventive, sometimes opportunistic, and do not necessarily have an immediate practical application or guarantee of success. This program supports pilot or exploratory studies, which may provide rapid results. Activities are not tightly restricted and can range from instrument development, lab testing, and field observations to model development, evaluation, and application.

date

Monday, February 11, 2019 to Monday, March 25, 2019
(All day)

resources

contact

Christine.Wiedinmyer@colorado.edu

2019-02-11 to 2019-03-25
 
CSTPR Noontime Seminar

CSTPR Noontime Seminar

Solutions for nature and people: bridging the ecological and social dimensions of conservation

by Charlotte Chang, National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis, University of Tennessee

Abstract: Achieving conservation success requires a detailed understanding of the dynamics of species and ecosystems. It also requires integrating people and the social motivations that determine how individuals, communities, and institutions interact with ecological systems when seeking to develop conservation solutions. I will show how this integration can be achieved by focusing on the tropical bushmeat crisis as an example. I will illustrate the ubiquity of terrestrial harvesting threats to species, show how models of decision-making behavior link human agents with ecological outcomes, and provide tools and recommendations to improve conservation practice. Measuring compliance with conservation regulations is critical for evaluating conservation success, but it has been challenging to assess in many regions at the forefront of environmental issues. I will show how to quantify non-compliance and I will describe how incorporating human decision-making behavior can lead to more effective conservation management strategies.

Charlotte Chang (Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, Princeton Univ.) is a Postdoctoral Fellow at NIMBioS. She is exploring the impact of diverse socio-cultural hunting practices as well as the response of hunting pressure to the spatial and temporal distribution of different harvested goods.

date

Wednesday, March 6, 2019
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

CSTPR Conference Room

Event Type

CSTPR

resources

2019-03-06
 
Engaged Scientist Public Lecture

Engaged Scientist Public Lecture

Are you a scientist grappling with the question of how to make your research more usable? Join Lisa Dilling, Director of Western Water Assessment, for a public talk on usable science, followed by a panel discussion featuring CU Boulder researchers (CIRES' Jeff Deems, Arnaud Chulliat, and Lise St. Denis) whose science has been used beyond the university. Through the talk and panel discussion, we will explore different pathways to usable science, look at practical considerations and pitfalls, and learn from some of the researchers who have made usable science a major part of their careers.

date

Wednesday, March 6, 2019
4:00pm to 5:00pm

location

contact

anne.u.gold@colorado.edu
2019-03-06