Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado Boulder

All day
 
 
Before 01
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
 
IRP Proposals Accepted February 11 - March 25

IRP Proposals Accepted February 11 - March 25

The CIRES Innovative Research Program will begin accepting applications February 11; all materials are due March 25 through this InsideCIRES link.

The IRP is designed to stimulate a creative research environment within CIRES and to encourage synergy between disciplines and research colleagues. The intent is to support small research efforts that can quickly provide concept viability or rule out further consideration. The program encourages novel, unconventional or fundamental research that might otherwise be difficult to fund. Funded projects are inventive, sometimes opportunistic, and do not necessarily have an immediate practical application or guarantee of success. This program supports pilot or exploratory studies, which may provide rapid results. Activities are not tightly restricted and can range from instrument development, lab testing, and field observations to model development, evaluation, and application.

date

Monday, February 11, 2019 to Monday, March 25, 2019
(All day)

resources

contact

Christine.Wiedinmyer@colorado.edu

2019-02-11 to 2019-03-25
 
CSTPR/Aerospace/ESOC Seminar

CSTPR/Aerospace/ESOC Seminar

Open data: The Global Effort for Open Access to Environmental Satellite Data

by Mariel Borowitz, Assistant Professor, Nunn School of International Affairs at Georgia Tech

SPECIAL SEMINAR: Cohosted by Aerospace/CIRES/CSTPR/ESOC
This talk will be held in the Discovery Learning Center's Collaboratory room 

Understanding and addressing environmental challenges, including climate change, requires access to accurate data from many sources. In some cases, government agencies that operate Earth-observing satellites have been leaders in this regard, making their data freely available to all users. In fact, some of the earliest references to "open data" can be traced back to early government satellite projects. However, many governments continue to restrict access to their unclassified Earth-observing satellite data, and even those that now make their data freely available did not always do so. Open Data: The Global Effort for Open Access to Environmental Satellite Data examines how government agencies developed data sharing policies for their Earth observation satellites and how these data sharing policies changed over time.

Mariel Borowitz is an Assistant Professor in the Sam Nunn School of International Affairs at Georgia Tech. Her research deals with international space policy issues, primarily international cooperation in Earth-observing satellites and satellite data sharing policies. Her research interests extend to human space exploration strategy and developments in space security and space situational awareness. Dr. Borowitz earned a PhD in Public Policy at the University of Maryland and a Master’s degree in International Science and Technology Policy from the George Washington University. She has a Bachelor of Science degree in Aerospace Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where she also earned a minor in Applied International Studies. Dr. Borowitz was on detail at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC from 2016 to 2018.

date

Friday, March 8, 2019
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

Discovery Learning Center, Collaboratory room

Event Type

CSTPR

resources

2019-03-08