Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado Boulder

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ESOC Virtual Weekly Coffee

ESOC Virtual Weekly Coffee

ESOC virtual coffee hour occurs weekly from 9-10am on Wednesdays. We will be meeting remotely on Zoom. Please email Claire Waugh (waughc@colorado.edu) for information.

ESOC researchers, post-docs and graduate students gather for conversation and to discuss research. Occasional guest speakers are invited to give short presentations on topics of interest.

date

Wednesday, September 30, 2020
9:00am to 10:00am

location

Zoom

contact

Claire Waugh; waughc@colorado.edu
2020-09-30
 
CO-LSEN Event: A Discussion on Institutional Racism in STEM

CO-LSEN Event: A Discussion on Institutional Racism in STEM

The most recent murders of Black people in United States have created a nationwide call for justice in nearly every pocket of society, and STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) is no exception. Institutionalized racism within STEM education, research, and culture has created and prolonged a system in which people of color are alienated and placed at significant disadvantages in obtaining degrees, training, and careers in these fields. The 2020 campaigns of #ShutDownSTEM and #NoTimeForSilence have demanded attention from the STEM community. The Colorado Local Science Engagement Network (CO-LSEN) plans to advance these movements through public dialogue, network strengthening, and action.

On Wednesday, September 30, 2020 via Zoom, CO-LSEN will host A Discussion on Institutional Racism in STEM featuring a panel of local and national experts and policymakers. The panel discussion aims to:

  1. Confront how anti-racist actions emanating from STEM research, teaching and engagement in the US; and how Colorado can foster dialogue, and make progress at the science-policy interface.
  2. Strengthen science, policy, and society networks as resources to discuss pressing challenges that require evidence and science-based information, shared through trusted and equitable processes.

The event will be split into two segments, focusing on challenges of institutional racism on the national level, followed by these same challenges at the Colorado state level.

Speakers include:

  • Dr. Karen Bailey, Assistant Professor, Environmental Studies, CU Boulder
  • Dr. Vernon Morris, Professor, Director, Arizona State University
  • Ms. Holly Olivarez, Environmental Studies & INSTAAR PhD student, CU Boulder
  • Dr. Valerie Otera, Professor, Science Education, CU Boulder
  • Dr. Sudip Parikh, Chief Executive Officer, AAAS
  • Dr. Paty Romero-Lankao, Mansueto Institute for Urban Innovation, University of Chicago & CO-LSEN Advisory Group
  • Dr. Wendy Smythe, Assistant Professor, University of Minnesota, Duluth 
  • Ms. Kadidia Thiero, SOARS Program Lead, UCAR | SOARS & CO-LSEN Advisory Group

CO-LSEN is a local and state advocacy program supported in partnership by the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) of the University of Colorado Boulder (CU Boulder) and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

The full agenda is available here. More Information.

date

Wednesday, September 30, 2020
12:00pm to 3:00pm
Mountain

location

Online through Zoom

resources

2020-09-30
 
NSIDC Cryosphere Seminar

NSIDC Cryosphere Seminar

The Cultural History of Greenland: Why It Matters to Modern Geopolitics by Dr. Mathias Nordvig, Head of Nordic Studies, CU Boulder

Greenland has been part of the Danish commonwealth since 1397. The country became an official colony in 1721 and was later given status as a county in 1953. In 1979, Greenland was officially recognized as a (incipient) sovereign nation by Denmark, when they received "home rule," and, finally, in 2009, Greenland was -at least on paper- recognized as an equal partner in a formal commonwealth collaboration between Denmark, Greenland and the Faroes. As an Arctic nation in rapidly changing climatic conditions, Greenland is quickly becoming an area of interest for different Arctic powers, not least the USA. In this whirlwind of modern geopolitics, the desire to advance your position on the global scene, and the striving for independence from Denmark, the ultimate question for many people in Greenland is not so much a matter of resources, changing climate and those outside forces pushing the country in different directions; the question is rather: who are we? And: how are we (doing)? My talk centers around the historical aspects of identity in Greenland and what it means to modern Greenlanders.

 

Mathias Nordvig, PhD, is an instructor of Nordic Studies and Head of the Nordic program at the Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures. His research interests include environmental humanities, myth, folklore and environment, and the uses of Norse mythology in contemporary sub-cultures and media.

date

Wednesday, September 30, 2020
11:00am to 12:00pm
MDT

location

Event Type

NSIDC

resources

contact

Mistia Zuckerman

2020-09-30