Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado Boulder



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January CMC Meeting

January CMC Meeting

Attendance

Mimi Hughes, CMC chair (PSD), Mistia Zuckerman, secretary (NSIDC), Lucia Harrop (CIRES Admin/ESRL), Michael Toy (GSD), Eric James (GSD), Brandi McCarty (CSD), Alessandro Franchin (CSD), Carrie Morrill (NCEI), Kathy Lantz (GMD), Jonathan Kofler (GMD), Antonietta Capotondi (PSD), Michael Buvek (ex-SWPC), Robin Moser (CIRES admin), Patrick Veres (CSD), Carrie Wall (NCEI), 

 

12:10pm - The meeting was called to order. 

Executive 

Robin will attend the executive meetings and Antonietta Capotondi will attend the Fellows Meetings.  Mimi explained that we need to identify alternatives.  Motion to approve Kathy as co chair and Alessandro being the alternate.  Motion was approved.  

  • Motion: To make Kathy Lantz of GMD as co-chair and Alessandro being the alternate.

The motion was approved unanimously.  

Outstanding performance awards (OPA)

Outstanding performance awards were explained. There is a desire to include different clusters on the OPA committee. Currently, SWPC and NCEI are represented. Looking for suggestions for non-CMC members to join the committee.  The time commitment involves reviewing nominations (service & science engineering categories) and a 3-hour meeting to discuss the top candidates.  Jon Kofler volunteered to represent GMD.  

Diversity and Inclusion

Mimi explained that Susan Sullivan is starting a working group for a workplace culture survey and is looking for committee members.  The committee would meet a few times to review possible questions.  Let Mimi know by the end of the week if you are interested. 

CIRES bikes

Mistia Zuckerman and Lucia Harrop explained that of the four CIRES bikes, there is never a demand to check out two at one time, but there are many requests from visitors to use bikes for while they are here, and especially over the summer.  Rather than have the bikes sit unused, Mistia and Lucia would rather the bikes be made available for visitors.  

  • Motion: To make a CIRES bike at each location (NSIDC and DSRC) available for long-term loan (limited to 3 months).

The motion was approved unanimously.  

Sending notifications of CMC Meetings

Mimi inquired which clusters sent out notifications of the meetings.  Mimi is concerned about Main Campus and East Campus.  

PSD – Antonietta

CSD – Alessandro/Chelsea

GSD – Eric

GMD – Jon

NCEI – Carrie M.

Main and East – Robin

NSIDC – Mistia

SWPS – Eric

Mentoring Program

Christine Weidinmeyer is interested in starting up a mentoring program.  Mimi asked for feedback about what the program might look like.  So far, it would be a mentor-matching program re. what type of mentoring you would like (it might be very specific).  You could sign up as both a mentor or a mentee. Should it be across all of CIRES or separate pools of people for on-campus and DSRC?  Response: better across CIRES.  NIST has a mentoring program that is more like a suggestion. CU already has mentoring programs for young women (CU Women Succeeding), etc.  Suggested that CIRES look at these programs as resources.  Is CIRES big enough to warrant having its own mentoring program? Discussion ensued regarding how to let new CIRES employees know about CIRES resources and the onboarding process.  

Bylaws

  • Motion: To approve CIRES bylaws.  

The motion was approved unanimously.  

 

1:48pm – entered CIRES executive session to discuss Executive and Fellows Meetings

Executive and Fellows Meetings 

Robin reported on the executive committee. Mimi suggested that we bring it up in more detail at the next meeting (agenda item).  

 

1:53pm – meeting adjourned

 

date

Wednesday, January 17, 2018
12:00pm to 2:00pm

location

resources

Files

Amenities

Lunch provided

2018-01-17
 
Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Modeling Snow in Western US: (i) improving and understanding dust-on-snow processes & (ii) developing a high resolution hydrologic modeling and data integration platform by Dr. Catalina Oaida, Postdoctoral Scholar, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Abstract:

In this talk I will focus on two main topics that share a common thread: snow in the Western U.S.

First, I will present land surface and regional climate modeling efforts from my PhD work, which involved improving snow processes in these numerical models (WRF-SSiB) by incorporating a more physically-based snow scheme (SNICAR) that accounts for snow grain growth as well as dust and black carbon in snow. We validate the model development at a site in the Upper Colorado River Basin where snow albedo, snow depth and dust concentrations were observed (among other quantities). We then run the modified WRF regional climate model for ten continuous years (2000-2009) over North America under two scenarios: (1) no aerosol deposition in snow, and (2) GOCART-modeled dust, black carbon, and organic carbon surface deposition in snow, and compare the two in order to investigate the impacts of aerosols in snow on the hydrologic cycle. Differences between these two cases reveal substantial changes, with dust and BC in snow causing 8.5 W/m2 additional spring net shortwave radiation absorbed at the surface over western US, about 0.5 °C average warming, with a reduction in regional-average snow water equivalent (SWE) of 12 mm.

More recently, during my postdoc appointment I have been involved with the Western States Water Mission (WSWM), which is a high resolution (1.75 km) hydrologic modeling and data integration platform, whose ultimate goal is to make hydrologic data available and accessible to users for both on-the-fly analysis and exploration, as well as for download. Two of the datasets coming out of this work are a historic (1981-2017) and an assimilated (2000-2017) SWE dataset. For the latter, MODSCAG fractional snow cover was assimilated using a batch smoother technique. Both SWE datasets are validated over the Tuolumne Basin in CA using the Airborne Snow Observatory measurements. A brief overview of the approach taken by WSWM will be presented, including the snow data assimilation framework and select data analytics tool capabilities.

date

Wednesday, January 17, 2018
11:00am to 12:00pm

location

East Campus, RL-2, Room 155

Event Type

NSIDC

contact

Mistia.Zuckerman@colorado.edu
2018-01-17
 
ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC Reading Room

date

Thursday, January 18, 2018
9:00am to 10:00am

location

ESOC Reading Room

contact

Ashley.Olson@colorado.edu
2018-01-18
 
Reservoir Sedimentation Management: Big deal! Why should we even care about it?

Reservoir Sedimentation Management: Big deal! Why should we even care about it?

by Dr. George W. Annandale, P.E.

Dams and reservoirs constitute a critical component of civil infrastructure, ensuring the stability of water and energy supplies and flood risk management. However, reservoir storage capacity, essential to meeting these purposes, has been filling with sediment (clay, silt, sand, gravel, and cobble) in a process known as reservoir sedimentation. Since the late 1990s, the global rate of storage loss to sedimentation has outpaced the rate of new storage construction. This trend will severely limit future amounts of water storage for domestic and industrial use and our ability to produce enough food. Globally, per capita reservoir storage has declined to levels not seen since in the mid-1960’s. Dr. Annandale will review the current state of affairs, and provide guidance on how these problems can be resolved.

Dr. Annandale is a civil engineer with more than 40 years of experience in water resources engineering. He is the author of over 100 articles and several popular books on reservoir sedimentation. One of his greatest concerns is that we will not be able to reliably supply fresh water in the future because of a global net loss of storage in water supply reservoirs caused by reservoir sedimentation. 

This event is part of a series of webinars on reservoir sedimentation, sponsored in part by the CIRES Education & Outreach group and the CIRES Western Water Assessment group, focused on reservoir sedimentation and sustainability. Organizers are part of the Subcommittee on Sedimentation’s National Reservoir Sedimentation and Sustainability Team, presenting sustainable solutions to reservoir sediment management.

The full list of upcoming and recorded webinars as well as professional development hour certificates can be found at this link: Announcing the Reservoir Sedimentation Management Webinar Series.

date

Thursday, January 18, 2018
11:00am to 12:00pm

Event Type

Seminar

resources

contact

J. Toby Minear

2018-01-18
 
 
 
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Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Atmospheric Chemistry of Volatile Organic Compounds by Joost de Gouw
CIRES & Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry 
"Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are released to the atmosphere from many different sources, both natural and man-made. In the atmosphere, VOCs are removed on time scales of minutes to months and this chemistry leads to formation of ozone and organic aerosol, two air pollutants that also affect climate. We have studied the emissions and chemistry of VOCs using a combination of field and laboratory measurements with mass spectrometry and gas chromatography. I will present some examples of the projects that I have worked on with graduate students over the years and of future research directions." 


and 


Every Drop Counts…Looking for Water on Mars by Maggie Tolbert
CIRES & Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry 
"Mars is a cold, dry planet where pure liquid water is not stable. However, recent observations of “recurring slope lineae” (RSL) on Mars may be evidence of current liquid water flows. Several different hygroscopic salts are known to exist in the Martian soil, and deliquescence of those salts could provide small amounts of liquid water temporarily. Our research group uses Raman microscopy and an environmental cell to probe the conditions under which such liquid brines can form and persist under low Martian temperatures. In addition, an optical trap is used to probe phase changes of individual levitated droplets. In this talk, I will discuss laboratory results for the brine-forming ability of several different Mars-relevant salts and salt mixtures and implications for water on Mars."
 

date

Monday, January 22, 2018
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

Ekeley S274

Event Type

Seminar

contact

Anne.Handschy@colorado.edu
2018-01-22
 
 
CSTPR Noontime Seminar

CSTPR Noontime Seminar

Flood modelling and early warning assessments for downstream communities of Koka Dam, Ethiopia

This talk will be available via live webcast. To view the live webcast please go to Adobe Connect and login as a guest.

An estimated 3,700 major dams (>1 MW capacity) are either planned or under construction, primarily in developing countries (Zarfl et al., 2014). While hydroelectric dams provide benefits such as electricity generation and economic revenue, they have the potential to flood downstream communities during releases preceding or following heavy precipitation events. In developing countries, where historical precipitation and flow data are limited, minimizing the impacts of these releases on downstream communities presents challenges for national governments and dam managers. In response, the Red Cross Red Crescent Climate Centre (Climate Centre) developed a self-learning algorithm (FUNES) software for flood forecasting to manage flood risks in vulnerable downstream localities. Successfully piloted in Togo in 2016, this innovation may enable regions with only a few years of data on river flow, precipitation, and local impact to provide flood warnings that can save lives and reduce losses in the immediate term, and open prospects for managing floodwater as a productive asset in the long term. This presentation is based on quantitative and qualitative data collected as a part of the Climate Centre internship in Addis Ababa and rural communities in Ethiopia. The primary goal of the study was to assess the feasibility of expanding FUNES to Koka Dam, Ethiopia’s oldest hydroelectric dam. While controlled releases from Koka Dam do not result in loss of life for downstream communities, these releases flood agricultural land and impact the economic prosperity and health of downstream communities. In this presentation, I argue that implementing FUNES on Koka Dam is feasible and has the potential to benefit downstream communities.

Katie ChambersKatie graduated from California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo (Cal Poly) in June 2016 with a BS in Environmental Engineering. Her extensive involvement in Cal Poly's student chapter of Engineers Without Borders sparked an interest in how engineering can help address the basic needs of developing communities, which motivated her to pursue a graduate education. She is currently completing MS and PhD degrees in Environmental Engineering and a certificate in Engineering for Developing Communities at the University of Colorado Boulder. Broadly, her research interests include both the social and technical factors that contribute to the long-term functionality and resilience of sanitation systems in resource-limited settings. She was selected at the 2017 Red Cross Red Crescent Climate Centre intern, performing flood modelling and early warning assessments in Ethiopia.

date

Wednesday, January 24, 2018
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

CSTPR Conference Room

Event Type

CSTPR

resources

2018-01-24
 
ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC Reading Room.

 

Please note: ESOC Weekly Coffee will now be held on Wednesday mornings, not Thursday mornings.

date

Wednesday, January 24, 2018
9:00am to 10:00am

location

ESOC Reading Room

contact

Ashley.olson@colorado.edu
2018-01-24
 
Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Committed Carbon Emissions and Global Warming due to the Permafrost Carbon Feedback by Yasin Elshorbany,  National Snow and Ice Data Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado at Boulder

 

Abstract:

This talk is to discuss a study in which we quantify the increase in carbon emissions and temperature due to Permafrost Carbon feedback (PCF), defined as the amplification of anthropogenic warming due to carbon emissions from thawing permafrost. We use the Biosphere/Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach (SiBCASA) model to simulate the committed carbon emissions, the cumulative total emissions from thawing permafrost by 2300 for a given global temperature increase by 2100, while we use the PAGE-ICE (policy analysis for the greenhouse effect) integrated assessment model to simulate the nonlinear feedback of permafrost emissions on climate. Our results show, for the first time, that the PCF warming signal decrease by 2200 due to land and ocean uptake (which increase to reach its maximum as a result of accumulating carbon emissions), in contrast to previous results which show an increasing warming followed by an equilibrium. Committed warming, calculated using the PAGE-ICE climate emulator, for 2 ºC global warming are 0.14 by 2100 and 0.32 by 2300 (without land and ocean uptake). These values are reduced to 0.08 by 2100 and 0.09 by 2300 (with land and ocean uptake). Unlike Land uptake, which depends on annual fluxes, ocean uptake reaches its maximum feedback at a later time, since it depends on the cumulated carbon emissions. The RF logarithmic dependence on CO2 lead to a reduced impact of extra ton of CO2 on the RF, especially for higher emissions scenarios, contributing to the decline beyond 2200. These combined factors, in addition to the exhausted carbon stocks, lead to a decline in the PCF feedbacks after 2200, slowing the warming caused by the PCF. Non-linear SIAF lead to a further decline of the warming signal (compared to using constant SIAF) beyond 2200 for the high emissions scenarios.

 

To join by ZOOM: 
From a computer: https://cuboulder.zoom.us/j/5409618610
Or iPhone one-tap :
US: +16465588656,,5409618610#
Or Telephone, Dial(for higher quality, dial a number based on your current location):
US: 1-646-558-8656 
Meeting ID: 540 961 8610
International numbers available: https://cuboulder.zoom.us/zoomconference?m=n9ouFAK_Rco_IPQABq0Xs3hCfONRRvVt

date

Wednesday, January 24, 2018
11:00am to 12:00pm

location

East Campus, RL-2, Room 155

Event Type

NSIDC

contact

mistia.zuckerman@nsidc.org
2018-01-24
 
 
 
 
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ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC Reading Room

date

Wednesday, January 31, 2018
9:00am to 10:00am

location

ESOC Reading Room

contact

Ashley.Olson@colorado.edu
2018-01-31