Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado Boulder



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Earth Lab Workshop

Earth Lab Workshop

Earth Lab invites you to a free, R TidyVerse Clean Coding workshop on Friday February 2nd from 1-4pm in SEEC S372. In this workshop, you will learn how to:
 
1.     Organize your scripts BEFORE you start coding using pseudo code
2.     Use tidyverse to “munge” - sort, clean, group and summarize tabular data
3.     Use loops to automate working with multiple .csv files
4.     Import data into R stored in the cloud using Amazon S3 links
5.     Optional: Create an R project from a git directory & plot using ggplot
 
REQUIREMENTS: This is a beginner / intermediate workshop. You should have some basic working knowledge of R to get the most out of this workshop.
 
The workshop will be led by Dr. Max Joseph (Lead Data Scientist) and Dr. Leah Wasser (Director of Earth Analytics Education).
 
To register please RSVP using this form by Monday January 29th at 9am. Spaces will be filled on a first come, first served basis so please confirm soon! Students, faculty and staff who are affiliated with Earth Lab and RSVP by the deadline will be given priority.
 
The workshop is open to all CU Boulder students, faculty and staff so please feel free to distribute this invitation to your colleagues.
 

date

Friday, February 2, 2018
1:00pm to 4:00pm

location

contact

Lauren.Herwehe@colorado.edu
2018-02-02
 
 
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CSTPR Noontime Seminar

CSTPR Noontime Seminar

Extreme events reconnaissance: Social science and interdisciplinary research in the disaster aftermath

***NEW ROOM LOCATION: UMC 415-417***

This talk will be available via live webcast. To view the live webcast please go to Adobe Connect and login as a guest.

Disaster researchers have been conducting field studies in the aftermath of major events since the 1950s. As disaster events increase in frequency and magnitude, more researchers are studying the impacts to the human and built environments. Yet, at present, the social science and interdisciplinary disaster research communities have:

  • no formal structure for organizing before, during, or after a disaster,
  • no established process for communicating pressing research needs, ongoing projects, or research outcomes to affected communities and decision-makers, and
  • no established culture regarding scientific agenda setting for rapid reconnaissance research.

This presentation will detail a new NSF-funded EArly-concept Grant for Exploratory Research (EAGER) project that is designed to establish a scientific platform and coordinating network for Social Science Extreme Events Reconnaissance (SSEER) and a second platform and network for Interdisciplinary Science and Engineering Extreme Events Reconnaissance (ISEEER). SSEER and ISEEER will draw upon insights from the science of team science (SciTS) and leverage databases and information resources available at the University of Colorado Boulder Natural Hazards Center to increase the capacity of the social science, engineering, and interdisciplinary hazards and disaster research communities. The ultimate vision for the work is to prepare individual researchers and teams to carry out extreme events rapid reconnaissance research that is coordinated, comprehensive, coherent, ethical, and scientifically rigorous. 

Lori PeekLori Peek is Director of the Natural Hazards Center and Professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of Colorado Boulder. She has written several award-winning publications including author of Behind the Backlash: Muslim Americans after 9/11, co-editor of Displaced: Life in the Katrina Diaspora, and co-author of Children of Katrina.

Peek is past Chair of the American Sociological Association Section on Environment and Technology and is currently the President of the Research Committee on Disasters for the International Sociological Association. She is a Board Member for the William Averette Anderson Fund, which is dedicated to increasing the number of underrepresented professionals in hazards and disaster research and practice.

Peek has won numerous awards for her teaching and mentoring, including the Colorado Board of Governor’s Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching Award. She currently teaches a graduate seminar in hazards and disasters, and a 410-student Introduction to Sociology course.

date

Wednesday, February 7, 2018
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

University Memorial Center Room 415/417

Event Type

CSTPR

resources

2018-02-07
 
ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC Weekly Coffee

date

Wednesday, February 7, 2018
9:00am to 10:00am

location

ESOC Reading Room

contact

Ashley.Olson@colorado.edu
2018-02-07
 
Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Why is there so much mercury in permafrost? by Dr. Kevin Schaefer, NSIDC

 

Abstract:

We estimated the total amount of mercury (Hg) in permafrost soils based on in situ measurements of sediment total mercury (STHg), Soil Organic Carbon (SOC), and the Hg to carbon ratio (RHgC) combined with maps of soil carbon.  We measured a median STHg of 43±30 ng Hg g soil-1 and a median RHgC of 1.6±0.9 µg Hg g C-1, consistent with published results of STHg for tundra soils and 11,000 measurements from 4926 temperate, non-permafrost sites in North America and Eurasia. We estimate the northern hemisphere permafrost regions contain 1656±962 Gg Hg, of which 793±461 Gg Hg are frozen in permafrost.  Permafrost soils store nearly twice as much Hg as all other soils, the ocean, and the atmosphere combined, yet global budgets assume little or no Hg in permafrost.  This is ten times the total anthropogenic Hg emissions over the past 30 years and this Hg is vulnerable to release as permafrost thaws over the next century.  Here we explain how we made the estimate, how the Hg got in the permafrost, and what may happen to the Hg in the future.

 

To join by ZOOM: 
From a computer: https://cuboulder.zoom.us/j/5409618610
Or iPhone one-tap :
US: +16465588656,,5409618610#
Or Telephone, Dial(for higher quality, dial a number based on your current location):
US: 1-646-558-8656 
Meeting ID: 540 961 8610
International numbers available: https://cuboulder.zoom.us/zoomconference?m=n9ouFAK_Rco_IPQABq0Xs3hCfONRRvVt

date

Wednesday, February 7, 2018
11:00am to 12:00pm

location

East Campus, RL-2, Room 155

Event Type

NSIDC

contact

Mistia.Zuckerman@colorado.edu
2018-02-07
 
More than just mountains: How the geology of the Sierra Nevada shapes modern American life

More than just mountains: How the geology of the Sierra Nevada shapes modern American life

Please join us for a book talk by Craig Jones, co-sponsored by the Center for Environmental Journalism and the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences.

Jones's book The Mountains That Remade America reflects on the Sierra Nevada range and how those mountains have changed the way Americans live, from ski towns to national parks, fresh fruit to environmental lawsuits. Whether and where there was gold to be mined redefined land, mineral, and water laws. Where rain falls (and where it doesn’t) determines whose fruit grows on trees and whose appears on slot machines. The book combines geology with history to show how the particular forces and conditions that created the Sierra Nevada have influenced daily life in the United States, both in the past and into the present day.

The book presentation will be followed by a Q&A session.

date

Thursday, February 8, 2018
5:00pm to 6:00pm

location

CIRES Auditorium

contact

Laura.Krantz@gmail.com
2018-02-08
 
 
 
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Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Assessing the Sources of Elevated Front Range Ozone Based on Observations from the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory by Emily Fischer, Colorado State University
 
"The Denver Metro/North Front Range area currently violates the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for ozone. I will discuss observations of ozone, its precursors, and other secondary species collected at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory during summer 2014 and 2015. My group has used our observations to 1) untangle the contribution of different classes of volatile organic compounds to ozone production in our region, and 2) identify how the addition of aged wildfire smoke can change the abundance of ozone precursors."

date

Monday, February 12, 2018
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

Ekeley S274

Event Type

Seminar

contact

Anne.Handschy@Colorado.EDU
2018-02-12
 
February CMC Meeting

February CMC Meeting

Attendance

Mimi Hughes, CMC chair (PSD), Mistia Zuckerman, secretary (NSIDC), Lucia Harrop (CIRES Admin/ESRL), 

Mike Toy (GSD), Chelsea Thompson (CSD), Alessandro Franchin (CSD), Eric Adamson (SWPC), Carrie Morrill (NCEI), 

Kathleen Lantz (GMD), Jonathan Kofler (GMD), Antonietta Capotondi (PSD), Amanda Morton (outreach), Nate Campbell (CIRES Admin)

 

12:10pm - The meeting was called to order. 

Membership

Mimi said that they are still looking for two more people to join from Main Campus.  Nate will send out a message and Mimi will talk to Christine.    

Outstanding performance awards (OPA)

Mimi reported that the OPA Chair is still looking for one more non-CMC member.  Non-CMC members typically do not serve more than a year in a row.  Questions ensued regarding how the award money is divided. If a group has one person who is a former employee while main part of the project was done, but then he is no longer a CIRES employee, what happens?  We do not state that you have to be a current employee to receive the award. 

  • Once that person leaves CIRES employment, they cannot receive money from CIRES. 
  • Will we accept nominations for people who are no longer CIRES employees?  There is no reciprocal award.  
  • What happens if there was a team of 3 people and 1 of them is a fed employee?  
  • Technically, the award nomination could go forward but do you judge it.  Mimi suggested that we suggest we review it on the work as a whole team.     

 

Motion: At the time of the nomination deadline, nominees must be active CIRES employees for individual and team awards.   

The motion was approved unanimously.  

 

Motion: In order to receive any OPA award, the nominee must be a CIRES employee at the time of the CIRES rendezvous.   

            The motion was approved unanimously.  

New Career Workshop

Christine Weidinmyer will be leading an early-career workshop.  Mimi will make sure the CMC gets information on this.  

J2 Waiver Processing Time

Alessandro reported that spouses on the J-2 need to do VS2019 (resident permit).  The visa allows you to go back and forth and this document lets you stay.  The J2 person only gets approval to work after 150 days after the J1 is approved. Lucia suggested that he work with International Students and Scholars, because they would know of work arounds.  It may be possible to get it processed sooner. It would be important to prioritize these people at CIRES so that there are not more delays than necessary.  

Executive and Fellows Meetings 

Mimi suggested that the person who goes to the meetings will write a short 2-sentence summary that goes out to the email list. Antonietta said that would be no problem.  

CMC Handbook

Mimi reported that an outgoing member felt strongly that we have a CMC handbook outlining what the CMC does.  The concern is that if several CMC members leave at the same time, there would not be a lot of direction for the next CMC group. Discussion ensued and concluded that no one has the time to do this right now.  Lucia pointed out that the CMC is very different and doing very different things than 10 years ago.  A possible alternative would be to have more mentoring and initiation when a new person starts.  

Fellows Meetings

Mimi raised a past issue that almost all of the Fellows are on Main campus.  A broad discussion ensued about how it could be more inclusive.  What are the NOAA scientists missing out on?  What is the definition and function of a fellow? CMC determined that there is enough interest to form a committee.  

Executive and Fellows Meetings 

Antonietta reported on the latest fellows meetings. 

 

1:47 concluded.   

 

  

 

 

 

date

Monday, February 12, 2018
12:00pm to 2:00pm

location

resources

Files

2018-02-12
 
 
ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC Reading Room

date

Wednesday, February 14, 2018
9:00am to 10:00am

location

ESOC Reading Room

contact

Ashley.Olson@colorado.edu
2018-02-14
 
 
Distinguished Lecture Series: Dr. Paul Wennberg

Distinguished Lecture Series: Dr. Paul Wennberg

Title: “Improving Air Quality: Is less NOx always better?”

Abstract: Regulations aimed at improving air quality in urban areas like Los Angeles have made rapid progress on reducing nitric oxide and hydrocarbon emissions. As old cars have been taken off the street in favor of cleaner new cars and diesel trucks have been retrofitted or replaced, nitric oxide emissions have dropped rapidly. During the last decade, for example, the amount of nitric oxide in Los Angeles's air has dropped by half. Air pollution regulations have also led to reductions in hydrocarbon emissions, but unlike NOx, these decreases are slowing. Hydrocarbons come from a variety of sources, making control strategies more challenging. For example, these compounds are released by the two-cycle engines used in leaf blowers and lawn mowers -- equipment that tends to stay in service longer than cars and is subject to fewer regulations. Thus, we are now entering a phase where declining NOx emissions are not matched by declining hydrocarbon emissions – a phase with little precedent. With respect to ozone levels, there is now significant evidence that we are headed the wrong way in Los Angeles. Improvements in aerosol burden have also slowed. Some of this has been predicted by standard air quality models, but emerging research described here suggests that air quality in a low-NOx / high hydrocarbon world may be worse than anticipated.

Bio: Paul Wennberg is the R. Stanton Avery Professor of Atmospheric Chemistry and Environmental Engineering at the California Institute of Technology. He also serves as Director of The Linde Center for Global Environmental Science. He joined Caltech in 1998 after receiving a B.A. from Oberlin College and a Ph.D. from Harvard (both in Chemistry). His research focuses on atmospheric composition. To study the long lived greenhouse gases, he is the Chair of the Total Carbon Column Observing Network and a science team member of the Orbiting Carbon Observatory mission (OCO-2). For air quality, his research group has invented new methods for quantifying gas-phase organic oxidation products in the atmosphere and participates in NASA and NSF funded field activities designed to improve our understanding of air quality and climate.

date

Friday, February 16, 2018
3:00pm

location

CIRES Auditorium, Room 338

Event Type

DLS

resources

Amenities

Refreshments provided

2018-02-16
 
 
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Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

The Application of Statistical Learning Techniques to Studying Arctic Sea Ice Survival by Mr. Matthew Tooth, Graduate Research Assistant, Colorado Center for Astrodynamics Research

 

Abstract:

 Arctic sea ice extent has continued to decline in recent years, and the fractional coverage of multi-year sea ice has decreased significantly during this period. The Beaufort Sea region has been the site of much of the loss of multi-year sea ice, and it continues to play a large role in the extinction of ice during the melt season. We present an analysis of the influence of satellite-derived ice surface temperature, ice thickness, albedo, and downwelling longwave/shortwave radiation as well as latitude and airborne snow depth estimates on the change in sea ice concentration in the Beaufort Sea from 2009 to 2016 using a Lagrangian tracking database with predictor importances derived from a random forest. The results of this analysis indicate that parcels that melt during summer in the Beaufort Sea reside at lower latitudes and have lower ice thickness at the beginning of the melt season in most cases. The influence of sea ice thickness and snow depth observed by IceBridge offers less conclusive results, with some years exhibiting higher thicknesses/depths for melted parcels.

 

To join by ZOOM: 

From a computer: https://cuboulder.zoom.us/j/5409618610

Or iPhone one-tap :

US: +16465588656,,5409618610#

Or Telephone, Dial(for higher quality, dial a number based on your current location):

US: 1-646-558-8656 

Meeting ID: 540 961 8610

International numbers available: https://cuboulder.zoom.us/zoomconference?m=n9ouFAK_Rco_IPQABq0Xs3hCfONRRvVt

date

Wednesday, February 21, 2018
11:00am to 12:00pm

location

East Campus, RL-2, Room 155

Event Type

NSIDC

contact

Mistia.Zuckerman@colorado.edu
2018-02-21
 
ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC Reading Room

date

Wednesday, February 21, 2018
9:00am to 10:00am

location

ESOC Reading Room

contact

Ashley.Olson@colorado.edu
2018-02-21
 
Reservoir Sedimentation Management Options and Data Needs

Reservoir Sedimentation Management Options and Data Needs

By Dr. Greg Morris, PE

During the 20th century, large investments were made building dams and reservoirs. However, with reservoir sedimentation diminishing reservoir storage volume and encroaching onto outlet works, the 21st century increasingly will see investment focused on activities to manage sedimentation problems to sustain operation of this critical infrastructure. Sediment management was not considered in the original design of most dams and to sustain dams and reservoirs in operation requires new and non-traditional approaches for design, operation and monitoring.

Dr. Morris will first describe the sedimentation patterns seen in reservoirs, together with the types of monitoring strategies needed to document the problem and identify appropriate solutions. He then will provide a broad overview of management strategies available to address sedimentation problems, giving examples from around the world.

Dr. Morris is a professional engineer with over 40 years of experience, working on design problems and lecturing in over 30 countries. Dr. Morris is co-author of the Reservoir Sedimentation Handbook and numerous peer-reviewed publications. He seeks to make the water resources community more aware of cost-effective design and operational practices that can sustain operation of critical reservoir infrastructure.

This event is part of a series of webinars on reservoir sedimentation, sponsored in part by the CIRES Education & Outreach group and the CIRES Western Water Assessment group, focused on reservoir sedimentation and sustainability. Organizers are part of the Subcommittee on Sedimentation’s National Reservoir Sedimentation and Sustainability Team, presenting sustainable solutions to reservoir sediment management.

The full list of upcoming and recorded webinars as well as professional development hour certificates can be found at this link: Announcing the Reservoir Sedimentation Management Webinar Series.

date

Thursday, February 22, 2018
11:00am to 12:00pm
MST

Event Type

Seminar

resources

contact

J. Toby Minear

2018-02-22
 
 
 
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Western Water Assessment Webinar

Western Water Assessment Webinar

Exploring the Use of Multiobjective Evolutionary Algorithms (MOEAs) for Long-term Planning by Front Range, Colorado, Water Managers
by Rebecca Smith, Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Colorado Boulder

 

More info: http://wwa.colorado.edu/events/webinars/

View the webinar here: http://cirescolorado.adobeconnect.com/wwa-2-26-2018

Please log in as a guest.


Many promising tools and methods developed in water resources systems analysis research have seen little uptake outside of academia. This may be due to a lack of effective communication about the research
to water managers, or it may be because the tools are not ultimately useful or usable in practice. Current predominant research frameworks do not provide insight into these issues or facilitate the incorporation of
industry needs into research agendas. We developed a structured process to address this disconnect called the Participatory Framework for Assessment and Improvement of Tools (ParFAIT). We applied ParFAIT specifically to Multiobjective Evolutionary Algorithm (MOEA)-assisted optimization. MOEAs are bottom-up decision support tools that researchers have proven can increase learning and improve outcomes in academic water resources planning studies, but which have seen very limited uptake in real-world water management. This presentation describes our application of ParFAIT during which we worked with Front Range, Colorado, water utilities to co-produce an MOEA testbed, evaluated the tool’s potential to enhance utilities’ long term planning processes, and applied statistical methods to advance the usefulness of MOEA results.


Rebecca Smith recently completed her PhD at the University of Colorado Boulder. The focus of her research was bridging the gap between academic applications of Multiobjective Evolutionary Algorithms (MOEAs) and the decision making needs of water utilities in their planning processes. Over the course of her studies, Rebecca collaborated with researchers from the CU’s Civil Engineering department and Environmental Studies Program, the Western Water Assessment (WWA), and the Center for Advanced Decision Support for Water and Environmental Systems (CADSWES), and she also worked with water managers from a variety of utilities in Colorado. Rebecca now works as a civil/hydrologic engineer with the Lower Colorado River Region of the Bureau of Reclamation in their Boulder, CO, offices. Her roles include coordinating research activities and contributing to technical analyses in support of Colorado River Basin planning studies.


This work is supported through NOAA’s Sectoral Applications Research Program (SARP)

date

Monday, February 26, 2018
1:00pm to 2:00pm

location

http://cirescolorado.adobeconnect.com/wwa-2-26-2018

contact

ursula.rick@colorado.edu
2018-02-26
 
Special Seminar

Special Seminar

Surprising global tradeoffs and synergies between fisheries and conservation by Matt Burgess
 
Abstract:
Understanding tradeoffs and synergies between stakeholder objectives is a major focus of environmental economics. In fisheries, it is conventional wisdom that ending overfishing of target fish stocks offers a synergy between fishery profits, food production, and the ecological health of these target stocks. In contrast, it is conventional wisdom that there is a tradeoff between maintaining fishery profits and conserving marine mammal, turtle, and bird species caught incidentally as fishery bycatch. Using theoretical and empirical evidence, I will argue that situations exactly opposite to these conventional wisdoms are common, especially in coastal waters of the developing world. With bycatch, we find that unsustainable mortality on marine mammal, turtle, and bird species very often goes hand-in-hand with overfishing of target fish stocks. Thus, reducing fishing pressure in these fisheries can solve both problems. In contrast, we find that classical single-species models used to manage target fish stocks can sometimes significantly overestimate the food production available in an ecosystem. Indeed, once species interactions are accounted for, we find that there can be a strong tradeoff between target stock health and food production, because the highest-yielding fishing strategies often involve depleting predator fish. We find less severe ecosystem-level tradeoffs between profit and target stock health, because predators often fetch the highest prices. Our findings carry important implications for managing ecosystems for the triple bottom line of economic, social, and ecological objectives. They also offer generalizable lessons about when resource management for multiple objectives can be made simpler, and when additional complexity is needed.
 
Bio:
Matt Burgess is a quantitative environmental scientist with an interdisciplinary background in economics and ecology. His research focuses on developing pragmatic management solutions for complex natural resource systems. Originally hailing from Montreal, Canada, Matt got his Honours B.Sc. in 2009 from the University of Toronto, and his Ph.D. in 2014 from the University of Minnesota. He is currently a Postdoctoral Scholar in the Bren School of Environmental Science and Management, and the Marine Science Institute, at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

 

View it live here: http://cirescolorado.adobeconnect.com/cires-2-26-2018/

date

Monday, February 26, 2018
3:00pm to 4:00pm

location

CIRES Auditorium

Event Type

Seminar
2018-02-26
 
 
ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC Reading Room

date

Wednesday, February 28, 2018
9:00am to 10:00am

location

ESOC Reading Room

contact

Ashley.Olson@colorado.edu
2018-02-28