Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado Boulder



Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
25
26
27
28
1
2
3
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
 
Special Seminar

Special Seminar

Coupled Changes: Environment, Policy, and Innovation by Steve Miller
 
Abstract:
Most environmental and natural resource challenges are fundamentally dynamic and involve coupled changes in environmental conditions, policies, and technologies. This coupling makes quantifying the impacts of environmental policies difficult, but it also suggests that environmental policies may be cheaper than we anticipate due to technological innovation. This talk will cover a sample of research addressing both issues. First, I’ll discuss a new method that blends machine learning and econometrics to estimate dynamic and heterogeneous policy effects. Applying that method to fisheries around the world indicates that individual quota programs do not work uniformly well across fisheries, and benefits may take years to realize. These findings have implications for both policy targeting and setting realistic expectations with resource stakeholders. The second part of the talk empirically examines policy-induced technological innovation in the context of the European Union’s Emissions Trading System (EU-ETS). In particular, I will present evidence of spillover effects: how economic incentives created by that policy stimulated innovation not only by regulated firms, but also by unregulated firms facing higher electricity prices. Finally, I'll end with a brief overview of future research directions and potential interdisciplinary collaborations.
 
Bio
Steve Miller started his career in computer science, earning his BS at Stanford and continuing on to work at Google on a variety of projects, including adding ocean features to Google Earth. That project piqued his interest in natural resource and environmental economics, leading him back to school. Since earning a PhD in 2015 from UC Santa Barbara, he has worked as an assistant professor in the Department of Applied Economics at the University of Minnesota. His current research involves combinations of three primary areas: (1) uses of machine learning in policy analysis, (2) natural resource management, and (3) drivers of environmentally-related innovation.

date

Monday, March 5, 2018
3:00pm to 4:00pm

Event Type

Seminar
2018-03-05
 
Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

International air quality, health, and climate impacts of cookstoves, diesel NOx, and other anthropogenic sectors via PM2.5 and O3 by Daven Henze, CU-Boulder Mech. Eng.
"Diesel cars, trucks, and buses produce ~70% of global land transportation emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx), a key PM2.5 and ozone precursor. Globally over 3 billion people presently use solid fuel for meal preparation. What are the impacts of these activities on the environmental through atmospheric chemistry and transport? Which species dominates the local and long-range health impacts of air pollution? I will first discuss the use of models and remote sensing measurements to evaluate the domestic and international contributions to PM2.5 and O3, and their impacts on human health and climate. Source-receptor relationships are developed using adjoint sensitivity analysis, constraints from remote sensing observations, and parameterized climate model sensitivities. This talk will then delve into application of these relationships to estimate impacts of diesel NOx emissions standards and solid fuel use in major markets and source regions worldwide. We find that the per-cookstove impacts on ambient air quality and global temperature changes are pronounced in several countries not typically targeted in cookstove mitigation efforts (e.g., Ukraine and Romania). We also show that real-world diesel NOx emissions in 11 markets representing ~80% of global diesel vehicle sales are significantly higher than certification limits indicate. This excess NOx contributed an estimated ~39,000 additional ozone- and PM2.5-related premature deaths globally in 2015, with a larger portion of this owing to excessive emissions from heavy duty vehicles than from defeat devices on light duty vehicles. Lastly, we present recent evaluation of the premature deaths and preterm births associated with global O3 exposure, showing that the former is possibly several times larger than previously expected, rivaling the health impacts of PM2.5 in severity."

date

Monday, March 5, 2018
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

Ekeley S274

Event Type

Seminar

contact

Anne.Handschy@Colorado.EDU
2018-03-05
 
ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC Reading Room

date

Monday, March 5, 2018
9:00am to 10:00am

location

ESOC Reading Room

Event Type

CSTPR

contact

Ashley.Olson@colorado.edu
2018-03-05
 
 
 
 
 
 
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
 
March CMC Meeting

March CMC Meeting

Attendance

Mimi Hughes, CMC chair (PSD), Lucia Harrop (CIRES Admin/ESRL), Eric Adamson (SWPC), Ale Franchin (CSD), Nate Campbell (CIRES IT), Mike Toy (GSD), Eric James (GSD), Carrie Morrill (NCEI), Antonietta Capotondi (PSD), Kathy Lantz (GMD), Carrie Wall (NCEI), Jon Kofler (GMD).

Visitors were introduced: Gretchen Richard (current head of CIRES finance), Susan Sullivan (diversity), Andrew Badger (CIRES researcher on campus), and David Stone (SWPC).

12:09 pm – The meeting was called to order.  

Executive

Did we decide at the January meeting that Ale would be the alternate for the Executive and Fellows committees?  Yes. Mimi suggests Ale should try to go to at least one meeting this year.

Spouse Visa Issue

Ale gave an update on a topic that came up at the last meeting.  For CIRES researchers with J1 visas with spouses on a J2 visa, there is a lag of time in approval of the visa, and spouses can lose their jobs.  Suggestions from CIRES: make sure everyone who is in this category knows who to call. Make sure there is something in the work permit for the visa renewal process.  Turn in J1s three months in advance, to reduce the lag time. Does CMC want to take up this issue? Gretchen: Rhonda Miller is going to be focusing exclusively on visas.  Discussion on the role CMC should take on this issue. Mimi suggests that Ale should write up all these details, and then Mimi and Kathy will take it to Christine Wiedinmyer and Heather Davis.  

Diversity and Inclusion

Susan Sullivan says a CIRES employee has brought up the use of preferred-gender pronouns (e.g., she, he, they, or xi) at the CIRES Rendezvous.  She suggested that this is becoming more common in different groups, including the American Astronomical Society. Apparently there are several ways to do it.  Possibly we could have a space to write in the pronoun each person prefers on the Rendezvous name tags. Mimi: Do we want to have something about this in the Rendezvous presentation?  Or at the Rendezvous registration table? Communication on the topic prior to Rendezvous would be important.

Motion: To have some way to communicate preferred pronouns on the name badges for Rendezvous.

The motion was approved unanimously.

Motion: To have some kind of diversion/inclusion portion in the Rendezvous presentation?

The motion was approved unanimously.

OPA eligibility

We should consider whether we want people who have recently left CIRES to be included on awards (although obviously not getting cash awards).  And should we try to distinguish projects from people? The way the award is worded, it suggests performance of a person, or a few people. But some groups have research that is very project-oriented.  Perhaps we should just limit the number of people who can be included on the award? There are concerns about not excluding excellent teams that are large. Several options were discussed, but we settled on having wording requesting information on the contributions of each individual team member for larger awards.   

Motion: To have a threshold team size where we would require descriptions of contributions by each individual for eligibility for the OPA.

The motion was approved.

Motion: To approve this wording for the OPA: For teams greater than 3 people, a statement on the contributions of each individual person is required.

The motion was approved.

1:50 pm – meeting adjourned

date

Monday, March 12, 2018
12:00pm to 2:00pm
2018-03-12
 
Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Diffusion of organics in secondary organic aerosol by Allan Bertram, University of British Columbia
"Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) can modify Earth’s climate by scattering and absorbing solar radiation and by modifying the properties of clouds. SOA can also negatively affect air quality and reduce visibility in urban environments. To predict the role of SOA in climate, air quality and visibility, a good understanding of the diffusion of organics within SOA particles is required. Through a series of laboratory studies, we have shown that the diffusion rate of organics within SOA particles depends strongly on several factors including the relative humidity and the precursors used to generate SOA. More recently, we have used these results to estimate the mixing times of organics within SOA particles in the planetary boundary layer and free troposphere."

date

Monday, March 12, 2018
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

Ekeley S274

contact

Anne.Handschy@Colorado.EDU
2018-03-12
 
Bystander Intervention Training

Bystander Intervention Training

3 Times and Locations!

Select your closest location:

NOAA Skaggs Building, Room GB124 (Outreach Classroom)
March 13, 2018. Time: 12-1:30p

CIRES Main, Ekeley S274 (Fellows Room)
March 14, 2018. Time: 9:00-10:30a

RL-2, Room 155
March 14, 2018. Time: 2:30-4:00p

 

 

Learn strategies to use if you see harassment or other problematic behaviors.

Teresa Wroe from the CU Office of Institutional Equity and Compliance will lead us through scenario-based exercises applicable to our discipline (e.g. in the field, at conferences, etc.). Practice your new skills in a safe environment and meet others who are interested in these topics.

Register for one of these sessions at the registration link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/65V5M6B

 

Questions? Email susan.sullivan@colorado.edu

date

Tuesday, March 13, 2018 to Wednesday, March 14, 2018
12:00pm

contact

Susan.Sullivan@colorado.edu
 
 
Earth Data Analytics Career Panel

Earth Data Analytics Career Panel

Earth Lab will be hosting an earth data science career panel on Friday March 16th from 3:30-5pm. Panelists will include:

  • Seth Spielman - Data Science Manager at Apple & Associate Professor of Geography at CU Boulder
  • Greg Holling – Senior Manager Software Engineering at the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON)
  • Lise St Denis - Data Scientist & Postdoc at CU Boulder Earth Lab
  • Jordan Winkler - Geospatial Big Data Solutioneer
  • Chris Crosby - Geodetic Imaging & Open Topography Project Manager at UNAVCO

Snacks and drinks will be provided. If you would like to attend please RSVP with this form by Monday March 12th at 5pm.

date

Friday, March 16, 2018
3:30pm to 5:00pm
2018-03-16
 
 
Bystander Intervention Training: NOAA Campus

Bystander Intervention Training: NOAA Campus

Learn strategies to use if you see harassment or other problematic behaviors.

Teresa Wroe from the CU Office of Institutional Equity and Compliance will lead us through scenario-based exercises applicable to our discipline (e.g. in the field, at conferences, etc.). Practice your new skills in a safe environment and meet others who are interested in these topics.

Register for one of these sessions at the registration link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/65V5M6B

 

Questions? Email susan.sullivan@colorado.edu

 

Other times/locations available:

CIRES Main, Ekeley S274 (Fellows Room)
March 14, 2018. Time: 9:00-10:30a

RL-2, Room 155
March 14, 2018. Time: 2:30-4:00p

date

Tuesday, March 13, 2018
12:00pm to 1:30pm

location

NOAA Skaggs Building, Room GB124
2018-03-13
 
CSTPR Noontime Seminar

CSTPR Noontime Seminar

Discourse networks and climate change: Comparing media debates on climate change policy in Canada, the US, Finland, Brazil, and India

This talk will be available via live webcast. To view the live webcast please go to Adobe Connect and login as a guest.

Abstract: Climate science has developed greatly during the last decades but climate change policies are still lagging behind all around the world. One of the biggest reasons for the inaction is that climate change is a cultural problem. In this presentation, I discuss my doctoral research which compares media debates on climate change in the US, Canada, Finland, Brazil and India. I use a method called discourse network analysis and show how it can be used to analyze policy debates in different countries. My research is interdisciplinary, using insights from political science (the Advocacy Coalition Framework) and cultural sociology (Boltanski and Thévenot’s justification theory). 

My dissertation focuses on three research questions: 

  • What types of policy beliefs divide policy actors into competing coalitions in different countries?
  • How central are different policy actors such as NGOs, business actors and researchers, in the debates on climate change in these different countries?
  • What types of moral justifications, such as appealing to market worth or ecological worth, are most central in debating climate change policy in these countries?

Anna KukkonenAnna Kukkonen is a Fulbright visiting scholar at the Center for Science and Technology Policy Research. Anna’s PhD research deals with comparative climate change politics, comparing media debates on climate change in five different countries: the US, Canada, Brazil, India and Finland. More specifically, she is interested in examining the formation of advocacy coalitions, the centrality of international organisations and the role of different moral justifications in the climate change debates in these diverse political-economic contexts.

Anna was awarded a Fulbright Graduate Grant to continue her PhD research at the University of Colorado Boulder where she aims to develop her knowledge on environmental governance, science-policy interactions and media's role in the politics of climate change. Anna holds a Master’s degree in Sociology from University of Helsinki where she also begun her graduate studies in 2014. She has specialized in comparative and political sociology but has recently become increasingly interested in combining comparative sociology with the study of public policy.

Anna is part of the international research project Comparing Climate Change Policy Networks (COMPON) which analyzes cross-country differences in climate change responses and currently includes 20 countries. She has been involved in the COMPON project for almost 4 years, collaborating with research teams around the world by sharing data, developing common research protocols and publishing articles in peer-reviewed journals.

date

Wednesday, March 14, 2018
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

CSTPR Conference Room

Event Type

CSTPR

resources

2018-03-14
 
ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC Weekly Coffee

date

Wednesday, March 14, 2018
9:00am to 10:00am

location

ESOC Reading Room

contact

Ashley.Olson@colorado.edu
2018-03-14
 
Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Arctic Dreams: The Role of Science in the Political and Economic Geography of the Arctic by Hannah Moench, Research Intern, Center for Strategic and International Studies, Washington, DC (former CU student)

 

Abstract:

Physical geography underlies and in many ways defines the shifting of political and human geography over time. In no place, perhaps, is this more apparent today than in the Arctic. As the Arctic melts, it is not only scientists, oil and gas prospectors, and far northern communities paying attention. Climate change has often been framed in terms of loss in the Arctic and in the globe, but many actors, from private companies to nations, see opportunity and are investing billions of dollars into that perceived opportunity today. I recently moved to D.C. to intern at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Although I work with a program that is focused on Eurasia as a whole, I also loan my time to our Arctic program and do a bi-weekly Arctic news compilation that I share more broadly. As a former University of Colorado student, I have been astounded by the absence of science in the discussion of Arctic economic potential and foreign policy. In my brief experience, it is often discussed either in broad terms or painted as a contradiction to realizing economic or political opportunity. In my talk, I will give a brief overview of the D.C. Arctic thinktank community, of CSIS research on the Arctic, and of current investment in connectivity and trade infrastructure in the Arctic. In addition, I will discuss the national economic and political dreams that are tied to these investments, and the specific and practical intersections I see between snow and ice science and the aforementioned topics. I look forward to gathering insights, thoughts and opinions from NSIDC and the broader cryosphere community!

 

To join by ZOOM: 

From a computer: https://cuboulder.zoom.us/j/5409618610

Or iPhone one-tap :

US: +16465588656,,5409618610#

Or Telephone, Dial(for higher quality, dial a number based on your current location):

US: 1-646-558-8656 

Meeting ID: 540 961 8610

International numbers available: https://cuboulder.zoom.us/zoomconference?m=n9ouFAK_Rco_IPQABq0Xs3hCfONRRvVt

date

Wednesday, March 14, 2018
11:00am to 12:00pm

location

East Campus, RL-2, Room 155

contact

Mistia.Zuckerman@colorado.edu
2018-03-14
 
EDDI Webinar

EDDI Webinar

Please join us for a webinar on EDDI (the Evaporative Demand Drought Index).

Mike Hobbins will provide a brief background on EDDI and its applications, and demonstrate new capabilities on the updated EDDI website.
 
Date: Wednesday, March 14, 2018
Time: 11:00 am (MST)
How to connect:  https://www.gotomeet.me/PSDIT
                           You can also dial in using your phone: United States: +1 (224) 501-3412
                           Access Code: 566-865-597

Abstract:  The Evaporative Demand Drought Index, or EDDI, is a drought index that can serve as an indicator of both rapidly evolving “flash” droughts (developing over a few weeks) and sustained droughts (developing over months but lasting up to years) and that has been shown to provide earlier warning of drought than many established drought indices, such as the US Drought Monitor. EDDI is currently under development at NOAA’s Physical Sciences Division and the Desert Research Institute and is slated for operationalization at the National Water Center by May, 2019. However, it is currently available on a quasi-operational basis from PSD for the whole of CONUS, and it may be tailored to your specific region on request.

EDDI examines how anomalous the atmospheric evaporative demand (E0; also known as "the thirst of the atmosphere") is for a given location at various timescales from 1 week through 12 months. By using a fully physical E0, EDDI captures drought dynamics from the demand perspective. This approach offers both early warning and a more-nuanced appreciation of the meteorological drivers of drought beyond the traditional reliance on precipitation and temperature. More information on EDDI, including current conditions and a user manual, is available in this 2-page handout (http://wwa.colorado.edu/publications/reports/EDDI_2-pager.pdf) and on the EDDI webpage.
 
During the webinar, we’ll briefly summarize the physical underpinnings of EDDI and its use as a drought monitor and early warning indicator, using examples from past droughts. We will focus on applications, including:
* using EDDI as a monitor of agricultural and hydrologic drought;
* using EDDI as a predictor of wildfire risk (showing early results from CA/NV);
* and how you can access both historical and up-to-date EDDI for your region.
 
We’ll also discuss new updates to the EDDI product, including:
* Webpage: a new EDDI webpage that includes current conditions, a nearly 40-year archive, a User Manual, and a tool to plot timeseries of EDDI for a specified region.
* Attribution: the ability to determine to what extent each of the drivers of E0 is driving its anomalous behavior, and so potentially driving drought.  
* EDDI change maps: mapping the changes in EDDI-category across a given time period, designed to assist users in recognizing emerging drying (and wetting) events.
 
The intended audience for the webinar includes:
* Drought information providers including boundary organizations such as RISAs, USDA Climate Hubs, and USGS Climate Science Centers;
* NIDIS Drought Early Warning Systems teams;
* US Drought Monitor authors;
* Federal, state, regional, and tribal water managers;
* NOAA River Forecast Centers and Regional Climate Service Directors;
* State climatologists;
* and current users of EDDI.
 
The webinar will last 45 minutes, with 15 minutes for questions. The slides and audio will be recorded and made available afterwards on the EDDI website.

date

Wednesday, March 14, 2018
11:00am to 12:00pm

location

Online

contact

ursula.rick@colorado.edu
2018-03-14
 
Bystander Intervention Training: East Campus

Bystander Intervention Training: East Campus

Learn strategies to use if you see harassment or other problematic behaviors.

Teresa Wroe from the CU Office of Institutional Equity and Compliance will lead us through scenario-based exercises applicable to our discipline (e.g. in the field, at conferences, etc.). Practice your new skills in a safe environment and meet others who are interested in these topics.

Register for one of these sessions at the registration link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/65V5M6B

 

Questions? Email susan.sullivan@colorado.edu

 

Other times/locations available:

NOAA Skaggs Building, Room GB124 (Outreach Classroom)
March 13, 2018. Time: 12-1:30p

CIRES Main, Ekeley S274 (Fellows Room)
March 14, 2018. Time: 9:00-10:30a

date

Wednesday, March 14, 2018
2:30pm to 4:00pm

location

RL-2, Room 155
2018-03-14
 
Bystander Intervention Training: CIRES Main

Bystander Intervention Training: CIRES Main

Learn strategies to use if you see harassment or other problematic behaviors.

Teresa Wroe from the CU Office of Institutional Equity and Compliance will lead us through scenario-based exercises applicable to our discipline (e.g. in the field, at conferences, etc.). Practice your new skills in a safe environment and meet others who are interested in these topics.

Register for one of these sessions at the registration link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/65V5M6B

 

Questions? Email susan.sullivan@colorado.edu

 

Other times/locations available:

NOAA Skaggs Building, Room GB124 (Outreach Classroom)
March 13, 2018. Time: 12-1:30p

RL-2, Room 155
March 14, 2018. Time: 2:30-4:00p

date

Wednesday, March 14, 2018
9:00am to 10:30am

location

CIRES Main, Ekeley S274 (Fellows Room)
2018-03-14
 
Bystander Intervention Training

Bystander Intervention Training

3 Times and Locations!

Select your closest location:

NOAA Skaggs Building, Room GB124 (Outreach Classroom)
March 13, 2018. Time: 12-1:30p

CIRES Main, Ekeley S274 (Fellows Room)
March 14, 2018. Time: 9:00-10:30a

RL-2, Room 155
March 14, 2018. Time: 2:30-4:00p

 

 

Learn strategies to use if you see harassment or other problematic behaviors.

Teresa Wroe from the CU Office of Institutional Equity and Compliance will lead us through scenario-based exercises applicable to our discipline (e.g. in the field, at conferences, etc.). Practice your new skills in a safe environment and meet others who are interested in these topics.

Register for one of these sessions at the registration link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/65V5M6B

 

Questions? Email susan.sullivan@colorado.edu

date

Wednesday, March 14, 2018
9:00am to 4:00pm
2018-03-14
 
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
 
NSIDC Guest Lecture

NSIDC Guest Lecture

“Signy Island – an Antarctic Oasis” Stories and Images from the Penguin Highway by Alex Taylor, Polar Guide, British Antarctic Survey

 

 

Description:    

 

In the Antarctic summer, Signy Island is home to three different penguin species, fur seals, elephant seals and numerous nesting sea bird species. The accessible, ice-free landscape of this small oasis in the South Orkney Islands provides just the right conditions for Antarctic wildlife to breed and rest in an otherwise challenging environment. It also makes Signy an excellent location for field research and wildlife monitoring.

 

Alex Taylor has worked as a polar guide in Antarctica for over 25 years; for the British Antarctic Survey (BAS), the United States Antarctic Program (USAP), as well as with film crews, in the tourism sector, and on research projects all over West Antarctica. Most recently, he has been working at the BAS’s Signy Research Station to combine his skills in the field with those as a drone pilot to conduct penguin surveys and map important habitat. This research is part of over forty years of wildlife monitoring at Signy Island, part of a long term effort to understand and manage the Southern Ocean fishery.

 

In this presentation Alex will share stories, photographs, and video clips from his last three seasons working on research projects on Signy Island. The presentation will focus on the monitoring of the Signy penguin populations which follows their breeding season from beginning to end. Alex will also describe the development of new techniques in applying drone work to wildlife and environmental monitoring in difficult conditions.

 

 

Refreshments to follow in CIRES Room 340

date

Monday, March 19, 2018
3:00pm to 4:00pm

location

CIRES Auditorium

contact

shari.fox@nsidc.org
2018-03-19
 
Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Separation of NOx emissions from drilling, and oil and gas extraction in the U.S. using monthly data from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument by Joep de Bruin
Visiting graduate student, de Gouw lab, CU Boulder
"Hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling have increased unconventional oil and gas extraction from shale reserves in the US in the last decade, making up half of total US oil and gas production at present. This activity results in NOx emissions in the extraction regions that are measurable from space using the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on the NASA Aura satellite. The NOx emissions are a result of two different processes: (1) the drilling and hydraulic fracturing of new wells, and (2) the extraction of oil and gas after the well is completed. To distinguish the effects of drilling and extraction on the NOx emissions, a multiple linear regression to the NO2 columns as a function of time is calculated for 9 extraction regions using the number of drilling rigs and the oil and gas production data from 2007 until 2018. In 3 regions (Permian, Bakken, Eagle Ford) a significant correlation between measured and calculated NO2 columns is found, of which the Permian region shows the highest correlation. The analysis shows that half of the total NOx concentration in this region can be attributed to emissions from oil and gas processes, and that both the drilling and extraction processes have an equal share in these emissions. In other extraction regions, NO2 columns show poor correlation with the oil and gas activity due to the proximity of urban areas (Barnett, Denver-Julesburg regions), power plants (San Juan) or variations in the drilling and extraction activity over time that are too small (Uintah, Upper Green River)."

date

Monday, March 19, 2018
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

Ekeley S274

Event Type

Seminar

contact

Anne.Handschy@Colorado.EDU
2018-03-19
 
 
ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC Reading Room

date

Wednesday, March 21, 2018
9:00am to 10:00am

location

ESOC Reading Room

contact

Ashley.Olson@colorado.edu
2018-03-21
 
Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Studying the Arctic boundary layer at University Centre in Svalbard by Meghan Helmberger & Erika Schreiber, Graduate Research Assistants, National Snow and Ice Data Center

 

Abstract: The University Centre in Svalbard (UNIS) offers undergraduate and graduate courses in Arctic biology, geology, geophysics, and technology. For five weeks in February-March, 2018 we took a class focused on the Arctic boundary layer: attending lectures, deploying instrumentation, and analyzing the data taken over our weeklong field campaign. The data collection mostly focused on recording temperature, humidity, pressure, energy fluxes, wind speed, and wind direction in the surrounding area of Longyearbyen, the largest settlement on Svalbard. This area is dominated by a major valley system with surrounding peaks up to 1000 m a.s.l., with the valley terminating in a fjord. During our time at UNIS temperatures ranged from 5oC to -20oC. The warmer temperatures coincided with a rain on snow event. Our class of twenty graduate students analyzed the data and saw that while generally driven at the synoptic-scale, weather in the region is strongly influenced by the surrounding complex terrain. Observations included evidence of cold pool formation, tip and low-level jets, and forced channeling of winds. In this talk we discuss some of these results as well as our overall experiences at UNIS.

date

Wednesday, March 21, 2018
11:00am to 12:00pm

location

East Campus, RL-2, Room 155

contact

Mistia.Zuckerman@colorado.edu
2018-03-21
 
Sedimentation Management for Multi-Purpose Reservoirs: A Federal Perspective

Sedimentation Management for Multi-Purpose Reservoirs: A Federal Perspective


Tim Randle

Paul Boyd

By Dr. Tim Randle, Bureau of Reclamation, and Dr. Paul Boyd, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

The Federal government owns 3,381 dams, representing 3.7 percent of the 90,580 dams listed in the U.S. National Inventory of Dams. Many of these dams are among the largest in the country and provide multi-purpose benefits for tens of millions of Americans. Though these multi-purpose dams are functioning as planned by trapping sediments supplied from the upstream watershed, they do disrupt the natural sediment continuity of river systems and very few were designed with sustainable reservoir sediment management in mind. Typically, Federal reservoirs were designed with a sediment design life of 50 or 100 years (the point at which sediment reaches the outlet level). At present, most federal multi-purpose dams are in the latter stages or have exceeded their sediment design life and many are considering more sustainable reservoir sediment management for the future.

In this talk, Dr. Randle and Dr. Boyd will discuss sustainable reservoir sedimentation management in multi-purpose dams, with a perspective from federal reservoirs. Dr. Randle and Dr. Boyd will discuss sedimentation issues facing federal dams, as well as current and future federal activities for achieving sustainable reservoir sediment management for the benefit of future generations.

Dr. Tim Randle, P.E., is a Supervisory Civil Engineer (Hydraulics) and Manager of the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation's Sedimentation and River Hydraulics Group.  He received his B.S. in Civil Engineering from the University of Utah in 1981 and his M.S. and Ph.D. in Civil Engineer from the University of Colorado in 2004 and 2014. Dr. Randle has served the Bureau of Reclamation for 38 years, developing several computer models and conducted geomorphic and hydraulic studies of many rivers throughout the western United States. In 1997, he was honored as Reclamation’s “Engineer of the Year” and named one of the top ten Federal Engineers by the National Society of Professional Engineers. In 2016, he received the Distinguished Service Award from the U.S. Department of the Interior.Dr. Randle is a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers, U.S. Society on Dams, and a Diplomate, Water Resources Engineer for the American Academy of Water Resources Engineers. He is past Chair of the Subcommittee on Sedimentation and Chairs the National Reservoir Sedimentation and Sustainability Team.

Dr. Boyd has been with the US Army Corps of Engineers for 16 years. He began his career working on river management and restoration projects and has transitioned to focusing on reservoir sedimentation, management, and sustainability problems. He currently works on advancing numerical modeling of reservoirs, promoting the need for reservoir sustainability, and manages sediment technical teams for international engagements in multiple Southeast Asia countries. Dr. Boyd represents the US Army Corps of Engineers on the ACWI Subcommittee on Sedimentation and is a member the National Reservoir Sedimentation and Sustainability Team.

This event is part of a series of webinars on reservoir sedimentation, sponsored in part by the CIRES Education & Outreach group and the CIRES Western Water Assessment group, focused on reservoir sedimentation and sustainability. Organizers are part of the Subcommittee on Sedimentation’s National Reservoir Sedimentation and Sustainability Team, presenting sustainable solutions to reservoir sediment management.

The full list of upcoming and recorded webinars as well as professional development hour certificates can be found at this link: Announcing the Reservoir Sedimentation Management Webinar Series.

date

Thursday, March 22, 2018
11:00am
Mountain Daylight Time

Event Type

Seminar

resources

contact

2018-03-22
 
Lens on Climate Change Film Screening

Lens on Climate Change Film Screening

Lens on Climate Change Film Shorts Pubic Screening
 
Join us to celebrate films made by middle and high school students that explore the effects of climate change on their community.These students come from Front Range school and have been making their films with the guidance of science and film mentors from CU and Colorado Film School.
 
Refreshments to follow!

date

Friday, March 23, 2018
12:00pm to 12:45pm

location

Visual Arts Complex (VAC) Basement: 1B20

Amenities

Refreshments provided

contact

erin.leckey@colorado.edu
2018-03-23
 
 
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
 
 
 
 
 
 
Apply now

Apply now

GPU Hackathon

Got Code? Complex scientific code—for weather or climate models, medical image processing, analyzing electromagnetic shifts, etc.—may run more efficiently on GPUs than on CPUs. Learn how to port your code successful to GPU systems at the GPU Hackathon here @CUBoulder June 4-8. Pull a team together and apply by the end of March.

OR: Sign up to serve as a GPU Hackathon Mentor! We are looking for experts at all career levels who want to train others in GPU programming and get access to free GPU compute cycles. Serving as a mentor is a great way to grow your professional network and establish your voice in the high performance computing community. 

 

 

date

Saturday, March 31, 2018
8:00am
2018-03-31