Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado Boulder



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Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

The peroxy radical chemistry that drives atmospheric nano-particle growth by Joel Thornton
University of Washington
"Organic carbonaceous material is a ubiquitous and often significant fraction of atmospheric particulate mass, and can be responsible for driving the growth of atmospheric nanoparticles formed from nucleation up to cloud condensation nuclei sizes. Development of a molecular-level understanding of the processes governing nano-particle growth by organic condensation has been a long running challenge. I will present new insights into to the chemistry of biogenic hydrocarbons that contribute to this process, using both in situ observations as well as controlled simulation chamber studies. An underlying theme is the role novel instrumentation techniques have had recently in allowing direct observation and quantification of a wide suite of organic molecules and chemical processes contributing to particle growth."

date

Monday, April 2, 2018
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

Ekeley S274

contact

Anne.Handschy@Colorado.EDU
2018-04-02
 
 
ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC Weekly Coffee

date

Wednesday, April 4, 2018
9:00am to 10:00am

location

ESOC Reading Room

contact

Ashley.Olson@colorado.edu
2018-04-04
 
Distinguished Lecture Series: Dr. Alan Robock

Distinguished Lecture Series: Dr. Alan Robock

Title: "Climatic and Humanitarian Impacts of Nuclear War"

Abstract:  A nuclear war between any two nations, such as India and Pakistan, with each country using 50 Hiroshima-sized atom bombs as airbursts on urban areas, would inject so much smoke from the resulting fires into the stratosphere that the resulting climate change would be unprecedented in recorded human history.  Our climate model simulations find that the smoke would absorb sunlight, making it dark, cold, and dry at Earth’s surface and produce global-scale ozone depletion, with enhanced ultraviolet (UV) radiation reaching the surface.  The changes in temperature, precipitation, and sunlight from the climate model simulations, applied to crop models show that these perturbations would reduce global agricultural production of the major food crops by 10-40% for a decade.  The impact of the nuclear war simulated here, using much less than 1% of the global nuclear arsenal, could sentence a billion people now living marginal existences to starvation.  The greatest nuclear threat still comes from the United States and Russia.  Even the reduced arsenals that remain in 2018 due to the New START Treaty threaten the world with nuclear winter.  The world as we know it could end any day as a result of an accidental nuclear war between the United States and Russia.  With temperatures plunging below freezing, crops would die and massive starvation could kill most of humanity.

            I will describe a new project being conducted jointly with scientists from the University of Colorado and NCAR, which is examining in detail, with city firestorm and global climate models, various possible scenarios of nuclear war and their impacts on agriculture and the world food supply.

            As a result of international negotiations pushed by civil society led by the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN), and referencing our work, the United Nations passed a Treaty to Ban Nuclear Weapons on July 7, 2017.  On December 10, 2017, ICAN accepted the Nobel Peace Prize “for its work to draw attention to the catastrophic humanitarian consequences of any use of nuclear weapons and for its ground-breaking efforts to achieve a treaty-based prohibition of such weapons.”  Will humanity now pressure the United States and the other eight nuclear nations to sign this treaty?

date

Thursday, April 5, 2018
4:00pm

location

CIRES Auditorium, Room 338

Event Type

DLS

resources

Amenities

Refreshments provided

2018-04-05
 
 
 
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Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Ecosystem-atmosphere fluxes of volatile organic compounds: Which ones matter? by Dylan Millet, University of Minnesota
"Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play several key roles in the atmosphere: their oxidation leads to the formation of health- and climate-relevant pollutants; they affect the nitrogen cycle by interacting with atmospheric NOx; and they modulate the atmosphere’s oxidizing capacity and therefore the lifetimes of greenhouse gases and other pollutants. Terrestrial ecosystems are simultaneously the largest source and a major sink of atmospheric VOCs; however, our understanding of these fluxes and their atmospheric impacts is challenged by a number of outstanding uncertainties, including complex emission sources, bidirectional exchange with the land surface, and chemical interactions with anthropogenic pollutants. In this talk I will present results from my group’s research applying observations to better characterize these ecosystem-atmosphere interactions and their effects on atmospheric chemistry. Discussion will focus on two specific themes. I will first present results focusing specifically on formic acid, which is a major source of atmospheric acidity and an integrated marker of hydrocarbon oxidation, but which has large missing sources. I will then discuss new measurements from my group using high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry to directly measure forest-atmosphere fluxes of VOCs simultaneously across the entire mass spectrum, and explore these results with the aim of better understanding i) how well our models capture this 2-way land-atmosphere carbon exchange, and ii) to what degree the fluxes for the large number of ions outside of the traditionally-measured subset matter for tropospheric composition."

date

Monday, April 9, 2018
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

Ekeley S274

contact

Anne.Handschy@Colorado.EDU
2018-04-09
 
April CMC Meeting

April CMC Meeting

Attendance

  • Mimi Hughes, CMC chair (PSD)
  • Mistia Zuckerman, secretary (NSIDC)
  • Antonietta Capotondi (PSD)
  • Nate Campbell (CIRES Admin)
  • Alessandro Franchin (CSD)
  • Carrie Morrill (NCEI)
  • Kathleen Lantz (GMD)
  • Mike Toy (GSD)
  • Eric Adamson (SWPC)
  • And guest Gabriela Adler (CSD)

12:07pm - The meeting was called to order.

CIRES Rendezvous

Because of the Rendezvous, there will not be a CMC meeting in May.  Nate explained that there will be a list for CMC sign-ups coming out soon.  Nate will send out a link making sure people sign up. Poster setup is 10-11:30 and will be followed by lunch.  There used to be a Question and Answer time with the director at the Rendezvous but that was removed because of the rotating town halls.  We could ask to have a town hall with Waleed, Christine, and Heather at the Rendezvous.

Reporting Vacation time

Discussion regarding reporting vacation time for CIRES employees.  For all of CIRES, employee vacation time will be moving to My Leave at MyCUInfo rather than doing it through InsideCIRES.  There will be no reminders if you forget to do your timesheet.

J1/J2 visa - work permit issue

Alessandro gave an overview of the J1/J2 visa work permit issue.  We need to make CIRES Administration aware of this issue. Is CIRES HR willing to prioritize these?  It is basically asking them to do a favor. “Agree to process the early application”

Insert language from Alessandro’s document.  Idea – a little cover letter with a box asking if the employees has a spouse with this issue.  Mimi suggested that the next step is to take this to Heather.

 

Motion: Mimi and Kathy will bring the work permit visa issue to Heather when they meet with her later this month.  

 

Motion approved unanimously.  

CMC Schedule

Mimi discussed the CMC meeting schedule.  There will not be a meeting in May. When we tour in the summer, we can have afternoon meetings around 2pm with cookies and coffee.  June will be at DSRC. July will be at East Campus. Mimi will send out suggested dates. Mimi will not be chair after September. New roles will start in October.   Kathy suggested starter questions to get people going.

Membership

Nate discussed prospective members from administration and finance.  

Morale

Discussion ensued regarding how CIRES employees are feeling in different parts of CIRES.  There is a sense that women are leaving CSD.

Executive and Fellows Meetings

There was no executive meeting this month.  

 

date

Monday, April 9, 2018
12:00pm to 2:00pm

location

Amenities

Lunch provided

2018-04-09
 
Special Seminar

Special Seminar

Chemistry of Volatile Organic Compounds in a Changing Atmosphere by Joost de Gouw

Light refreshments will be served after the talk in Room 340.

 

Abstract:
 

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere can react to form important pollutants such as ozone and secondary organic aerosol, and can also have direct effects on human health. In this seminar, I will present several new insights into the sources and chemistry of VOCs in urban air, from oil and natural gas production and in biomass burning emissions.

Emissions of VOCs from motor vehicles have strongly declined for decades, and as a result, other emission sources such as from the use of volatile chemical products (e.g. cleaners, glues, coatings, solvents and personal care products) have become more important in urban air. I will show how measurements in urban air can be used to determine emissions of reactive VOCs, despite the fact that they can be removed and/or formed in between the time of emission and sampling. As many volatile chemical products are used inside buildings, I will show how measurements of indoor air can be used to determine emissions.

Electric power generation by wind and solar is expanding rapidly, but the use of natural gas power plants to make up demand will likely remain in the foreseeable future. The production of natural gas in the United States is currently at an all-time high. Methane emissions associated with this activity have received much attention because they offset the climate benefits of this lower-carbon fuel. Less attention has been paid to the emissions of air pollutants such as VOCs and nitrogen oxides (NOx). Using results from airborne measurements during the NOAA SONGNEX campaign, I will show that a significant fraction of VOC emissions over the lifecycle of oil and natural gas takes place during production. Using remote sensing measurements made from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument onboard the NASA Aura satellite, I will show that both the drilling of new wells as well as the extraction of fossil fuels that follows contribute to emissions of NOx.

Wildfires in the United States have become more frequent and extensive during a longer wildfire season. Due to the complexity of fuel composition and burning conditions, biomass burning emissions are among the most challenging to analyze chemically, which makes it difficult to describe the atmospheric fate and health effects. Measurements of VOCs from biomass burning emissions were made at the Fire Sciences Laboratory in Missoula, MT during the NOAA FIREX study. I will show how different processes such as distillation and pyrolysis can explain the composition of VOC emissions for different fuels and phases of a burn. I will also show the results from laboratory experiments aimed at elucidating the chemistry of functionalized aromatic compounds that are common from biomass burning.

Finally, I will briefly discuss the development and characterization of new instrumentation for VOC measurements that will likely lead to new discoveries in our science.
 
Bio:

Joost de Gouw received a PhD in Physics from the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands in 1994. He is a Senior Research Scientist and Fellow with the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado in Boulder, and an Adjoint Professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. His research over the past two decades has focused on the sources and chemical transformations of organic compounds in the atmosphere, the formation of ozone and secondary organic aerosol, and the impact that these processes have on air quality, climate change, and human health.

date

Tuesday, April 10, 2018
2:00pm to 3:00pm

location

CIRES Auditorium
2018-04-10
 
Combating Harassment in Geosciences: NSIDC

Combating Harassment in Geosciences: NSIDC

Work through complexities of reporting problematic behaviors and learn about different options at CU and through geosciences professional organizations.  Teresa Wroe from the CU Office of Institutional Equity and Compliance will lead us through scenario-based exercises applicable to our discipline. Practice your new skills in a safe environment and meet others who are interested in these topics. Light refreshments will be provided. This workshop meets the CU requirement for training in harassment policy and reporting requirements.

RSVP at: https://tinyurl.com/CIRESPolicyReporting

 

Can't make this one? Three Sessions:

  • 4/10/18 RL-2 East Campus, Rm 155, 12-1:30p
  • 4/11/18, CIRES Main Fellows Room, 12-1:30p
  • 4/12/18, NOAA DSRC, Rm GC402, 12-1:30p [Note:  Must have access badge or have name submitted to DOC campus security by 4/10/18]

date

Tuesday, April 10, 2018
12:00pm to 1:30pm

location

RL-2, Room 155

contact

Susan.Sullivan@colorado.edu
2018-04-10
 
CSTPR Noontime Seminar

CSTPR Noontime Seminar

Conference on World Affairs Event
Our Lives in the 21st Century: The Best of Times or the Worst of Times?

This talk will be available via live webcast. To view the live webcast please go to Adobe Connect and login as a guest.

Alexander Verbeek, Yale Greenberg World Fellows
Stockholm Environment Institute and Stockholm International Water Institute

In late 2015 the international community set the multilateral agenda for the future by agreeing on the UN Agenda 2030 and the Paris Agreement on Climate Change. In that unique diplomatic season of huge multilateral meetings on diplomatic and development issues, a smaller event was organized in the Peace Palace in The Hague, where 350 representatives from 75 countries met for the first Planetary Security Conference. Experts and diplomats discussed the impact of planetary change on international- and human security. 

But since 2015 the international political landscape has changed considerably, while we are constantly reminded of the urgency for tackling the environmental and security challenges. Technology may bring solutions but also poses new challenges. Is this the best of times? More people than ever before are part of the world middle class. Or is this the worst of times, in a world with so many refugees and IDP’s? We never saw so much welfare but we also never faced so many existential challenges. Will we share our wealth, or will we protect it behind walls? Is this a pivotal moment in the human history? In this complex web of global developments, we have to take the right decisions now. A presentation, and discussion with the audience, on key questions for our lives in the 21st century.

Biography: Alexander Verbeek is a Dutch diplomat, and former strategic policy advisor, at the Netherland Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Over the past 28 years, he has worked on international security, humanitarian and geopolitical risk issues, and the linkage to the earth's accelerating environmental crisis. 

He created the Planetary Security Initiative, held at The Hague's Peace Palace, where representatives from 75 countries meet annually on the climate change-security relationship. Currently, he works as an expert speaker and advisor on planetary change to academia, global NGO's, private firms, and international organizations. 

Alexander is recognized online as an influential leader to follow on climate change. As of early 2018, his Twitter site, @alex_verbeek has 155,000 followers. He also actively engages followers through other social media platforms such as Instagram and LinkedIn, produces his website blogs and writes environmental essays on Medium. 

Alexander is an associate at the Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI) and the Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI). He recently founded the Netherlands based, Institute for Planetary Security where he directs projects related to the geopolitical impacts of the changing climate, water, food, energy, economic and demographic conditions. 

In 2014 he became a World Fellow at Yale University. Alexander Verbeek is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts and Visiting Fellow in the Peace and Conflict Department of Uppsala University in Sweden. He is on the board of advisors of several international environmental initiatives. Alexander is a world traveler, photography buff, hiker, and sailor.

date

Wednesday, April 11, 2018
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

CSTPR Conference Room

Event Type

CSTPR

resources

2018-04-11
 
Combating Harassment in Geosciences: CIRES Main

Combating Harassment in Geosciences: CIRES Main

Work through complexities of reporting problematic behaviors and learn about different options at CU and through geosciences professional organizations.  Teresa Wroe from the CU Office of Institutional Equity and Compliance will lead us through scenario-based exercises applicable to our discipline. Practice your new skills in a safe environment and meet others who are interested in these topics. Light refreshments will be provided. This workshop meets the CU requirement for training in harassment policy and reporting requirements.

RSVP at: https://tinyurl.com/CIRESPolicyReporting

Can't make this one? Three Sessions:

  • 4/10/18 RL-2 East Campus, Rm 155, 12-1:30p
  • 4/11/18, CIRES Main Fellows Room, 12-1:30p
  • 4/12/18, NOAA DSRC, Rm GC402, 12-1:30p [Note:  Must have access badge or have name submitted to DOC campus security by 4/10/18]

date

Wednesday, April 11, 2018
12:00pm to 1:30pm

location

Fellows Room, CIRES

contact

Susan.Sullivan@colorado.edu
2018-04-11
 
Combating Harassment in Geosciences: NOAA Campus

Combating Harassment in Geosciences: NOAA Campus

Work through complexities of reporting problematic behaviors and learn about different options at CU and through geosciences professional organizations.  Teresa Wroe from the CU Office of Institutional Equity and Compliance will lead us through scenario-based exercises applicable to our discipline. Practice your new skills in a safe environment and meet others who are interested in these topics. Light refreshments will be provided. This workshop meets the CU requirement for training in harassment policy and reporting requirements.

RSVP at: https://tinyurl.com/CIRESPolicyReporting

Can't make this one? Three Sessions:

  • 4/10/18 RL-2 East Campus, Rm 155, 12-1:30p
  • 4/11/18, CIRES Main Fellows Room, 12-1:30p
  • 4/12/18, NOAA DSRC, Rm GC402, 12-1:30p [Note:  Must have access badge or have name submitted to DOC campus security by 4/10/18]

date

Thursday, April 12, 2018
12:00pm to 1:30pm

location

DSRC GC402

contact

Susan.Sullivan@colorado.edu
2018-04-12
 
 
 
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Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Optical Properties of Absorbing Organic Aerosol by Kevin Jansen, CU Boulder, ANYL 3rd year, Tolbert lab
"Until relatively recently, it has been assumed that organic aerosol only scatters light, thereby having a negative radiative forcing and global cooling effect. However, aerosol formed from the aqueous-phase reaction of small di-carbonyl compounds, such as glyoxal and methylglyoxal, with ammonium salts have the potential to form light-absorbing brown carbon (BrC) aerosol. Studies of BrC formation mechanisms and optical properties have been primarily preformed using bulk-aqueous solutions, although bulk-phase studies are not perfect simulations of reactions occurring within aerosol particles. In order to characterize BrC aerosol formed in the aerosol phase, we utilize Cavity ring-down (CRD) and Photoacoustic spectroscopies (PAS) to monitor the absorption and extinction of BrC aerosol formed from reactions of glyoxal and ammonium sulfate aerosol within reaction chamber. The PAS allows for the detection of BrC absorption even under conditions in which a few μg/m3 of weakly absorbing material is made. In addition, depending on the RH of the aerosol and if the aerosol was exposed to light, we observed differing losses in absorption by the BrC aerosol, which may indicate that BrC persists longer in the atmosphere than predicted from bulk phase experiments."

date

Monday, April 16, 2018
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

Ekeley S274

contact

Anne.Handschy@Colorado.EDU
2018-04-16
 
 
ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC Weekly Coffee

date

Wednesday, April 18, 2018
9:00am to 10:00am

location

ESOC Reading Room

contact

Ashley.Olson@colorado.edu
2018-04-18
 
Book Talk: Brave New Arctic, by Mark Serreze

Book Talk: Brave New Arctic, by Mark Serreze

Brave New Arctic: The Untold Story of the Melting North

A book talk by NSIDC Director and CIRES Fellow Mark Serreze

From publisher Princeton University Press: In the 1990s, researchers in the Arctic noticed that floating summer sea ice had begun receding. This was accompanied by shifts in ocean circulation and unexpected changes in weather patterns throughout the world. The Arctic’s perennially frozen ground, known as permafrost, was warming, and treeless tundra was being overtaken by shrubs. What was going on? Brave New Arctic is Mark Serreze’s riveting firsthand account of how scientists from around the globe came together to find answers.

This event is free and open to the public, but please register through EventBrite. After the talk and discussion, join us for refreshments and a book signing. A representative of the Boulder Bookstore will have books for sale (cash and credit card).

More from the publisher

date

Thursday, April 19, 2018
5:00pm
Mountain Time

location

Event Type

Seminar

resources

Amenities

Refreshments provided

contact

2018-04-19
 
NASA Machine Learning Career Panel

NASA Machine Learning Career Panel

 

date

Thursday, April 19, 2018
1:00am to 2:30am
MST

Event Type

Seminar
2018-04-19
 
 
 
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Analytical Chemistry Seminar

Analytical Chemistry Seminar

Mechanistic Modeling of Reactive Soil Nitrogen Emissions on a Continental Scale, by Quazi Ziaur Rasool, Rice University 

"Nitrogen is an essential building block of all proteins and thus an essential nutrient for all life, including crops. Biological Nitrogen Fixation is the natural source of soil nitrogen available for biogeochemical transformations. However, anthropogenic perturbation to nitrogen cycle through the combustion of fossil fuels and consistently increasing fertilization is now larger than natural sources in the United States and globally. Recent global nitrogen budgets estimate that soil reactive nitrogen (Nr) emissions (predominantly from biochemical transformations in soil) have increased by a factor of 2-3 from pre-industrial levels. These increases are especially pronounced in agricultural regions. These emissions from biogeochemical transformations can be in reduced (NH3) or oxidized (NO, HONO, N2O) form, depending on complex biogeochemical transformations of soil nitrogen reservoirs. 

Reactive nitrogen in the atmosphere is a precursor for ozone and particulate matter formation and contributes to nutrient loading by being washed out by precipitation and the deposition of atmospheric nitrogen gases and aerosols. Until recently, little progress has been made in modeling of the cascade of nitrogen from soil to the atmosphere due to the complexity of and uncertainty in its transport and transformation. The lack of understanding of these multimedia transport processes is due to the typical focus of research on specific media and the difficulty in parameterizing the anthropogenically fixed nitrogen and their input into the atmosphere, primarily through mineral fertilizer application to crops, the largest source of environmental reactive nitrogen.

This talk will focus on modeling of the exchange of gaseous nitrogen species between the soil and the atmosphere, with an emphasis on Nitrogen oxides (NO, HONO). Contemporary air quality models like U.S. EPA’s Community Mulitscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model, typically neglect soil emissions of HONO and N2O. Previous soil nitrogen parametrizations in CMAQ have focused on NO emissions only and in a manner inconsistent with how soil NH3 emissions (i.e. accounting for anthropogenically fixed nitrogen from fertilizer application and atmospheric deposition). Thus, there is a need to more mechanistically and consistently represent the soil N processes that lead to emissions to the atmosphere. The new mechanistic scheme addresses the spatial-temporal variability of different reactive nitrogen emissions from soil through complex transport and transformation of soil nitrogen pools in both agricultural and non-agricultural soils. The CMAQ model with a new mechanistic scheme for modeling reactive nitrogen emissions from soil will be described and evaluated against observations of atmospheric particulate matter and NOx emissions. The use of multimedia and biome-specific measurements to constrain model parameters, and how this can improve continental scale (Continental US) models will be presented. These findings will be presented with an emphasis on the sensitivity of the modeling system to different air-soil exchange parameterizations and how the representation of these emissions can be improved." 

 

date

Monday, April 23, 2018
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

Ekeley W165-166
2018-04-23
 
 
CSTPR Noontime Seminar

CSTPR Noontime Seminar

Finding new ground for advancing hydro-climatic information use among small mountain water systems

This talk will be available via live webcast. To view the live webcast please go to Adobe Connect and login as a guest.

Significant effort has been put into advancing the use and usability of information products to support adaptation to drought and climate variability, particularly for the water supply sector. This effort is warranted, as risks associated with drought and water scarcity are increasing across the western United States with population growth, changes to the volume and timing of snowpack runoff, and increased competition for different types of water uses. In an effort to improve usable science efforts, researchers to date have placed an emphasis on understanding various determinants that shape water managers’ readiness to take up information, especially factors related to the information products themselves (intrinsic factors) and to managers’ decision contexts and institutional constraints (contextual factors). This talk will present results from a recent study examining information use preferences and practices specifically among managers of small-scale water systems in the Upper Colorado River Basin, with an eye toward identifying new opportunities to effectively scale information usability and uptake among all water managers—from small and large systems alike—in a resource-constrained world. Our finding suggest that boundary organizations and other usable science efforts would benefit from capitalizing on the shared social identity and communities of practice that bind water managers together. Strategic engagement with larger, well-respected water systems as early adopters may serve as a useful alternative strategy to penetrate a new market of users (small-scale systems). Ultimately, we find a general sentiment among managers that the utility of additional or improved information has limits, suggesting a need for shifting away from improving forecasts to supporting managers to better cope with uncertainty. Ideas for future research will be discussed.

Biography: Rebecca Page is a Master's student in the Environmental Studies program at CU Boulder. Her academic research spans both theoretical and applied questions of when, why, and how communities and decision-makers adapt to climate variability and change. She is a graduate research student within the CU-Boulder's Western Water Assessment, where she studies drought risk decision-making and vulnerability perception among water managers in the Upper Colorado River Basin. She is also an affiliate with the boutique consulting firm Adaptation International, where she provides research support on vulnerability assessment and adaptation planning projects for communities across the US. Rebecca's interest in climate adaptation and resilience stems from her experiences living and working in some of the most vulnerable places in the world -- including coastal and delta mega-cities such as Shanghai, Guangzhou, Mumbai, and Dhaka. Prior to pursuing graduate studies, she worked in the international development sector on a range of applied research and capacity building initiatives related to urban sustainability and climate change. From 2010-2011 she was a Fulbright Research Fellow in China, where she researched public participation in water quality monitoring. Rebecca received her B.A. in Environmental Studies and East Asian Studies from Oberlin College.

date

Wednesday, April 25, 2018
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

CSTPR Conference Room

Event Type

CSTPR

resources

2018-04-25
 
Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Chemistry on Mars: The Search for Habitable Environments with Curiosity
Melissa Trainer,
Planetary Environments Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
"Following on decades of exploration of Mars, our knowledge of our neighboring planet has advanced well beyond observations of canals to the comprehensive characterization of surface topology and regional mineralogy. There are clear lines of evidence for past liquid water and a complex climate history. Yet some of the fundamental questions remain: Was there ever life on Mars? Could there have been life on Mars? The Curiosity rover carries the most advanced analytical laboratory sent to another planet, and over the past four and half years the mission has performed a detailed in situ investigation of Gale Crater. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite in particular has quantified geochemical indicators that demonstrate the environment could have supported life, and has achieved detection of the first organic molecules on Mars. Atmospheric measurements by SAM have identified signatures of planetary change over billions of years and monitored modern activity. This presentation will recount the most important findings on the chemistry of Mars to date, and will discuss the implications for our understanding of whether the red planet was ever habitable."

date

Wednesday, April 25, 2018
2:30pm to 3:30pm

location

EKLY W166
2018-04-25
 
ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC Weekly Coffee

date

Wednesday, April 25, 2018
9:00am to 10:00am

location

ESOC Reading Room

contact

ashley.olson.colorado.edu
2018-04-25
 
Permitting for Reservoir Sedimentation Management

Permitting for Reservoir Sedimentation Management

image of Dr. Hotchkiss
Dr. Rollin H. Hotchkiss
Image of David Olson
David Olson

By Dr. Rollin H. Hotchkiss, P.E., and David Olson 

Previous webinars in this series addressed the causes and impacts of reservoir sedimentation and options for sediment management - that is, either removing sediment deposits from a reservoir or passing incoming sediment or deposited sediment downstream.  This webinar will address the primary federal permitting requirements for activities associated with reservoir sediment management.  Our current regulatory framework, designed to support landmark legislation such as the Clean Water Act, did not recognize the eventual need to introduce sediment into streams and rivers exiting from reservoirs.  The steps required to obtain necessary permits for reservoir sedimentation management will be explained and illustrated, including current activities to try to streamline the permitting process.

Dr. Rollin H. Hotchkiss is a professor and Chair of the Civil and Environmental Engineering department at Brigham Young University. He is a core member of the International Sediment Initiative sponsored by UNESCO, a member of the National Reservoir Sedimentation and Sustainability Team, chair of the ASCE-EWRI Task Committee on Reservoir Sediment Management and chair of the Environmental Advisory Board of the Chief of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Dr. Hotchkiss has authored or co-authored more than 150 technical papers and was the 2017 recipient of the American Society of Civil Engineers Hydraulic Structures Medal.

David B. Olson is a Regulatory Program Manager at the Headquarters office of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. He has worked for the Corps since 1991, beginning as a Regulatory Project Manager at the Baltimore District, evaluating applications for Department of the Army authorization to do work in waters and wetlands. In 2002, he began working at his current position at Corps Headquarters. His focus areas currently include wetland and stream restoration, managing the Corps nationwide permit program, and Endangered Species Act compliance for Department of the Army permits.

This event is part of a series of webinars on reservoir sedimentation, sponsored in part by the CIRES Education & Outreach group and the CIRES Western Water Assessment group, focused on reservoir sedimentation and sustainability. Organizers are part of the Subcommittee on Sedimentation’s National Reservoir Sedimentation and Sustainability Team, presenting sustainable solutions to reservoir sediment management.

The full list of upcoming and recorded webinars as well as professional development hour certificates can be found at this link: Announcing the Reservoir Sedimentation Management Webinar Series.

 

date

Thursday, April 26, 2018
11:00am
Mountain Daylight Time

location

Event Type

Seminar

resources

contact

2018-04-26
 
 
 
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Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Inhalation and Sublingual Delivery of Medical Cannabinoids and Vaccines
by Robert Sievers,
University of Colorado, Environmental Program
"The development of cannabis products that conform to pharmaceutical level quality standards would be of great benefit to those attempting to use cannabis for medicinal purposes. Currently, the cannabis industry generates products that vary substantially in consistency of dosing, time of onset, and safety of administration route. The bioavailability of these products is not optimal due to a combination of inefficient absorption, first pass metabolism effects, and cannabinoid degradation. To combat these issues, we have developed a cannabinoid-containing dry powder that utilizes isolated, highly purified cannabinoids and excipients that are generally regarded as safe (GRAS) or have recently been determined in clinical trials of formulations to be safe for inhalation. The powder is suitable for respiratory delivery from a simple dry powder inhaler (DPI). Delivery to the lungs in this manner provides a consistent dose with a rapid onset of effects and avoids the bioavailability issues and first-pass metabolism encountered with other methods of administration. Various cannabinoids can also be combined in customized ratios targeted for the treatment of specific pathologies. A new US Patent #9,895,321 to the five authors (Sievers; Robert E., Cape; Stephen P., McAdams; David, Manion; J'aime, Pathak; Pankaj) was issued on February 20, 2018. Authors: Robert Sievers, Lia Rebits, Xuno Gildelamadrid"
and
Observations of particle organic nitrates from airborne/ground platforms: Insights into method improvement, vertical/geographical distribution, gas/particle partitioning, losses, and contribution to total particle nitrate
by Doug Day,
University of Colorado, ANYL ResSci, Jimenez group
"Organic nitrate formation in the atmosphere represents a sink of NOx and termination of the HOx /NOx ozone formation cycles, can act as a NOx reservoir transporting reactive nitrogen, and contributes to secondary organic aerosol formation. However, particle-phase organic nitrates (pRONO2) are rarely measured and thus poorly understood. Due to the increasing prevalence of aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) field measurements and promise of its use in determining quantitative bulk organic nitrate functional group contribution to aerosols, a detailed evaluation of quantification methods is timely. A simple method that relies on the relative intensities of NO + and NO2 + intensities in the AMS spectrum, calibrated NOx + ratio for NH4NO3 , and inferred ratio for pRONO2 has been previously proposed as a way to apportion the total nitrate signal to NH4NO3 and pRONO2, and been used by several groups using a variety of different methods and assumptions. An extensive survey of NOx + ratios measured for various pRONO2 compounds and mixtures from multiple instruments, groups, and laboratory and field measurements shows that, in the absence of a pRONO2 standard, the pRONO2 NOx + ratio can be estimated using a ratio referenced to the calibrated NH4NO3 ratio, a so-called Ratio-of- Ratios (RoR). We systematically explore the viability, accuracy, and errors associated with quantifying pRONO2 with the AMS RoR NOx + ratio method using ground and aircraft field measurements conducted over a large range of conditions. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) of thermal denuder measurements was conducted to further explore the efficacy of the RoR NOx + ratio method and to construct volatility basis sets (VBS) of pRONO2 for several campaigns. A broad survey of ground and aircraft AMS measurements, applying the RoR NOx + ratio method, shows a pervasive trend of higher contribution of pRONO2 to total nitrate with lower total nitrate concentrations.
Simultaneous measurements of pRONO2 (applying the AMS RoR NOx ratio method) and of total (gas+particle) organic nitrate (totRONO2), organic aerosols (OA), and ammonium nitrate from aircraft and several ground campaigns were used to investigate vertical/geographical distributions, gas/particle partitioning, losses, and contributions to total particle nitrate (pTotNO3) over North America. pRONO2 and totRONO2 concentrations show strong vertical gradients, with a steep decrease from the top of the boundary layer (BL) up through the residual layer. However, pRONO2 was 10-30% of totRONO2 with little vertical gradient in gas/particle partitioning from the BL to upper troposphere (UT). pRONO2 contribution to OA shows a moderate increase with decreasing OA in the BL and free troposphere (~2-3% by mass of nitrate group) with higher contributions at the lowest OA (5-8%), mostly observed in the UT. In the BL, RONO2 gas/particle partitioning shows a trend with temperature, with higher particle-phase fraction at lower temperatures, as expected from partitioning theory. However, the temperature trend is much weaker than for single compound partitioning, which may be due to a broad mixture of species. Little to no dependence of pRONO2 /OA on RH or estimated particle water was observed in the BL, suggesting that losses of pRONO2 due to hydrolysis are too rapid to observe in this dataset and there may be a substantial fraction of pRONO2 species that are not prone to rapid hydrolysis."

date

Monday, April 30, 2018
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

Ekeley S274

contact

Anne.Handschy@Colorado.EDU
2018-04-30
 
SafeZone Training: NSIDC

SafeZone Training: NSIDC

Morgan Seamont and Scarlet Bowen from the CU Gender and Sexuality Center will lead us through scenario-based exercises common in our discipline. Safe Zone Training is offered in order to build an inclusive work environment for LGBTQAI+ employees, students and allies. Practice your new skills in a safe environment and meet others who are interested in these topics. Light refreshments will be served. 

RSVP at: https://tinyurl.com/CIRESSafeZone

Can't make this one? Three Sessions:

  • 4/30/18 RL-2 East Campus, Rm 155, 11:30-1p
  • 5/1/18, CIRES Main Fellows Room, 10:30a-12n
  • 5/2/18, NOAA DSRC, Rm 2A305, 9:30-11a [Note: Must have CAC badge or RSVP by 4/30/18 so that your name may be provided to DOC security.]

date

Monday, April 30, 2018
11:30am to 1:00pm

location

RL-2, Room 155

contact

Susan.Sullivan@colorado.edu
2018-04-30