Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences



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Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Investigating the pH of atmospheric fine particles and implications for atmospheric chemistry by Hongyu Guo, Postdoctoral Researcher, Jimenez lab, CU Boulder

"Particle acidity is a critical but poorly understood quantity that affects many aerosol processes and properties. In this talk, I will introduce a popular pH prediction method in recent years since pH detection technique is limited. Particle pH and water (which affects pH) are predicted using a thermodynamic model and measurements of RH, T, and inorganic gas and particle species. The method was first developed during the SOAS field campaign conducted in the SE US in summer (fine particle pH = 0.94 ± 0.59), and then extended to aircraft observations in the NE US in winter (WINTER study; pH = 0.77 ± 0.96). The results are validated by reproducing particle water and gas-particle partitioning of NH4 + and NO3 - (sensitive to pH). I will show why commonly used pH proxy, ion balance or molar ratio, doesn’t necessarily represent pH. Some impacts of low particle pH were investigated, including the effects on aerosol nitrate trends and the role of acidity in heterogeneous chemistry. Despite a ~70% sulfate reduction in the southeastern US in the last 15 years, the fine particles remained highly acidic due to buffering by semivolatile  NH3. Importantly, pH is not highly sensitive to NH3, a 10-fold increase in NH3 only increases pH by one unit in various locations and seasons, which has implications for use of NH3 controls to reduce PM 2.5 concentrations."

 

*Note: this is a short seminar, expected to end early*

date

Monday, October 1, 2018
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

Ekeley S274

contact

Anne.Handschy@Colorado.EDU
2018-10-01
 
 
Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Applications of Machine Learning and Natural Language Processing in the Polar Deep Insights Project by Dr. Siri Jodha Khalsa, NSIDC research scientist.  

ABSTRACT:  Polar Deep Insights, an NSF-Funded EarthCube project that is building an end-to-end system to collect, analyze and make interactive the wealth of polar-related textual and scientific data mined from the Web. Researchers apply their domain knowledge to train machine-learning (ML) models that power an intuitive search engine to be utilized for polar research. The system includes an interface to analyze and visualize results using Banana and D3.js, giving researchers a better understanding of the relationship of the discovered content within the Polar data ecosystem.  This talk will provide a brief introduction to the tools and techniques of information retrieval and data science that we are being developed and applied: Apache Sparkler, Tika, and Solr; ML models (SVM, MLP ANN, Random Forest and Naive Bayes classifiers); Gensim and spaCy libraries for Natural Language Processing; and a concept editor that allows users to build an 'ontology-of-interest' to derive insights using the Insight Visualizer.    https://nsidc.org/research/bios/khalsa.html

TO JOIN BY ZOOM:
From a computer: https://cuboulder.zoom.us/j/5409618610  
Or iPhone one-tap :
    US: +16465588656,,5409618610#  
Or Telephone:
    Dial(for higher quality, dial a number based on your current location): 
        US: +1 646 558 8656  
    Meeting ID: 540 961 8610

date

Wednesday, October 3, 2018
11:00am to 12:00pm
MST

location

NSIDC, RL-2, Room 155/153

Event Type

NSIDC

contact

Mistia Zuckerman

2018-10-03
 
ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC Weekly Coffee

date

Wednesday, October 3, 2018
9:00am to 10:00am

location

ESOC Reading Room

contact

Ashley.Olson@colorado.edu
2018-10-03
 
 
 
 
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Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Small molecules in the Anthropocene: Opportunities in remote pristine and polluted air by Prof. Rainer Volkamer,
ANYL Faculty, CU Boulder

"The Volkamer group develops advanced optical instrumentation (in situ and remote sensing) to measure small molecules and aerosols that are relevant to public health and climate. We seek to develop a molecular level understanding of the fundamental physical chemistry affecting their sources, transformations and sinks using a combination of field observations, laboratory experiments and modeling. Opportunities for graduate study exist as part of funded projects to 1) better understand anthropogenic enhancements of biogenic organic aerosol and new particle formation (laboratory studies), 2) to develop innovative retrievals for CU SOF, apply them to aircraft datasets that characterize wildfires quantitatively for the first time, and test and develop atmospheric models, and 3) to develop long-term datasets of halogen oxide radicals and oxygenated VOC in the remote marine atmosphere."

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In situ production of methyl bromide, methyl chloride, and carbon disulfide in the GISP2D ice core by Christopher Lee,
ANYL 1st year, CU Boulder

"The mixing ratios of methyl bromide, methyl chloride, carbon disulfide, and carbonyl sulfide were measured via gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in eleven samples from the GISP2D ice core from Summit, Greenland. The samples range in depth from 1826 meters to 2020 meters and in age from 15000 years BP to 25000 years BP. Correlations between the trace gas mixing ratios and the concentrations of major ions (Na+, NH4+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Cl-, NO3-, and SO42-) in the ice at the same depth are examined. Additionally, correlations between the trace gas mixing ratios and the concentrations of sea salt and non-sea salt components of major ions in the ice at the same depth are examined. Finally, correlations between the trace gas mixing ratios and the concentrations of major ions in the ice at the same age are examined. Due to the significant difference in age (~619 years) between the air trapped in the ice and the ice itself, the same-depth correlations provide evidence for the in situ production of methyl bromide, methyl chloride, and carbon disulfide within the examined depth range. The same-age correlations provide evidence for a contemporaneous connection between carbonyl sulfide and sodium chloride."

date

Monday, October 8, 2018
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

Eklely 274
2018-10-08
 
Confluir Film Screening

Confluir Film Screening

Announcing the first Colorado screening of "Confluir," a National Geographic-supported film about the Grand Canyon of the Amazon and the movement to protect it (trailer). 

Who? You! Open to the entire Boulder/Denver community

When and where? 6:30pm (doros open at 6), October 9, 2018 at the NEST Studio for the Arts gallery (CASE building on the CU-Boulder main campus. Map here.)  Parking garage in building or a 2 minute walk from SKIP bus stop (Euclid and Broadway).

Admission? Free!  But you must RSVP -- takes ~7.6 seconds to do here.

More: Come enjoy an evening of remote whitewater journeys, amazing Andes-to-Amazon scenery, all the while helping to build the growing global river conservation movement.  Many of this project's roots are based in the Boulder and CU communities, with many expedition members attending to answer any and all questions you have. Join us to learn how you can be on the next expedition down the Rio Maranon and Grand Canyon of the Amazon, one of Canoe and Kayak's Threatened Paddling Classics.

date

Tuesday, October 9, 2018
6:30pm

location

NEST Studio for the Arts gallery (CASE building on the CU-Boulder main campus.)

contact

Alice.hill@colorado.edu
2018-10-09
 
Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Space Lasers!  ICESat-2 Data Products and Services by Dr. Steve Tanner, ICESat-2 Data Manager at NSIDC

ABSTRACT:  ICESat-2 was successfully launched on the morning of September 15, 2018.  Once it becomes operational in late 2018, ICESat-2’s 6 laser beams will canvas the Earth. They will measure the height of pretty much everything, on a scale and resolution that is unprecedented.  NASA’s National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) will host all of the ICESat-2 data over the coming years.  This talk with focus on ICESat-2’s instruments, details on each of the 20 products that will be available (from sea ice height to forest canopies and fresh water lakes), and the data services that will be available for researchers as they utilize these products.

TO JOIN BY ZOOM:
From a computer: https://cuboulder.zoom.us/j/5409618610  
Or iPhone one-tap :
    US: +16465588656,,5409618610#  
Or Telephone:
    Dial(for higher quality, dial a number based on your current location): 
        US: +1 646 558 8656  
    Meeting ID: 540 961 8610

date

Wednesday, October 10, 2018
11:00am to 12:00pm
MST

location

NSIDC, RL-2, Room 155/153

Event Type

NSIDC

contact

Mistia Zuckerman

2018-10-10
 
TEDxSalonBoulder: The Melting Arctic

TEDxSalonBoulder: The Melting Arctic

The Arctic is one of the most rapidly changing ecosystems on the planet. Rising greenhouse gases have profoundly disrupted weather and environmental patterns that, while extreme, have shown stability over several thousand years. No more. The Arctic is melting before our eyes.

Understanding how the Arctic is changing—and how it will change as greenhouse gases continue to rise—is critical for commerce, national defense, and for rich oceanic and terrestrial ecosystems and environments that have supported indigenous peoples for 10,000 years. The observed dramatic changes in the Arctic climate system, including fast retreat of Arctic sea, can be simulated and understood using numerical models run on supercomputers.

This TEDxBoulderSalon will highlight the rich scientific expertise located here in Boulder to open a window on this imperiled region and its people.

Expert participants from CIRES, NOAA, CU Boulder and elsewhere include: Jennifer Kay, Mark Serreze, Matthew Shupe, Sandra Starkweather, Ariel Morrison, Katie Boyd, Mathias Nordvig, Heidi McCann, Giff Miller, Mike Willis, and Cassandra Brooks.

This event is hosted by TEDxBoulderSalon, CIRES, NOAA, CU Boulder, and the CU Museum of Natural History. 

Registration ($10) is required and seating is limited. Students and community members who need a discount code can use "student." 

date

Wednesday, October 10, 2018
5:30pm to 7:00pm

location

CU Museum of Natural History

resources

contact

Katy Human, kathleen.human@colorado.edu
2018-10-10
 
 
 
 
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Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

McMurdo Dry Valleys: Ecosystems waiting for water by Dr. Diane McKnight, Professor

ABSTRACT:  The McMurdo Dry Valleys region in Antarctica is comprised of alpine and terminal glaciers, large expanses of patterned ground, and permanently ice-covered lakes in the valley floors, which are linked by glacial meltwater streams that flow during the austral summer. These valleys were first explored by Robert Scott and his party in 1903. In 1968 the New Zealand Antarctic Program began a gauging network on the Onyx River, a 32 km river that is the longest river in Antarctica. As part of the McMurdo Dry Valleys Long-Term Ecological Research project, our research group has continued to monitor streamflow in the Onyx River and 15 other first-order streams in adjacent valleys. We studied the linkages between hydrology, biogeochemistry and microbial community ecology in stream ecosystems through a period of climatic extremes. In the 1990’s, a cooling period continued that was driven by atmospheric changes associated with the ozone hole. In the summer of 2001/002, this cooling period was interrupted by several warm and sunny summers that created "flood events" in the valleys and caused much greater ecological connectivity. Further, we found that flow regime strongly influences the composition of the diatom community in the algal mats that are abundant in many of the streams. Many of the diatom taxa are endemic to the region, with a few endemic taxa being most abundant in wetland systems that only become active during flood events. During floods, the microbial mats are scoured from the streambed and mat material is transported to the closed basin lakes. Thus, understanding the relationship between mat communities and hydrology is useful for interpretation of the record of the stream diatoms preserved in lake sediments and perched deltas to reconstruct the hydrologic record beyond the limited instrumental record of the Dry Valleys.

TO JOIN BY ZOOM:
From a computer: https://cuboulder.zoom.us/j/5409618610  
Or iPhone one-tap :
    US: +16465588656,,5409618610#  
Or Telephone:
    Dial(for higher quality, dial a number based on your current location): 
        US: +1 646 558 8656  
    Meeting ID: 540 961 8610

date

Wednesday, October 17, 2018
11:00am to 12:00pm
MST

location

NSIDC, RL-2, Room 155/153

Event Type

NSIDC

contact

Mistia Zuckerman

2018-10-17
 
CSTPR Noontime Seminar

CSTPR Noontime Seminar

Local responses to disasters in Peru and Puerto Rico: An approach from zero-order responders
by Fernando Briones, Consortium for Capacity Building, Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research

This talk will be available via live webcast. To view the live webcast please go to Adobe Connect and login as a guest.

Abstract: During disasters there is a window of time before official and/or external support arrives. During this period, citizens must act unsupported by first responders – devising self-coping strategies in order to survive.  In the days, weeks and months following a disaster, local populations are still facing recovery with creativity.  The actions and experiences of citizens pro-acting to pave fruitful futures is valuable experience on improvements for disaster risk reduction and management.  Here we introduce the notion of Zero Order Responders (ZORs); they are the first to the unfolding events of a disaster, because they live at ground zero. In order to support this concept we review two extreme hydrometeorological events illustrating how local populations cope with disasters during the period before external support arrives. The data was collected by direct observations during the 2017 El Niño Costero-related floods in Peru, and by the review of press following 2017 hurricanes Irma and Maria destruction in Puerto Rico. The ZORs  testimony about  how they survived and their perception of preexisting preventative programming is likely the truest compass on the clearest path to improvements and the rethinking of measures developed dominantly from the top down.

BrionesFernando Briones is a Research Associate at Consortium for Capacity Building (Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research) of the University of Colorado, Boulder. He holds a PhD in Social Anthropology from The School for Advanced Studies in Social Sciences (École des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales), Paris, France.

He has been consultant and researcher in Mexico, collaborator and lecturer of international organizations in Latin America such as FAO, UNDP and ECLAC. He is a member of the Scientific Advisory Committee for National Coordination of Civil Protection of Mexico, and a member of the National System of Researchers of The National Council of Science and Technology of Mexico.

His work focuses on disaster risk reduction, the understanding of risk perception, social vulnerability, resilience and the applicability of public policies on climate change adaptation. His articles, books and scientific reports have been mainly developed with research in Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, Peru and Central America.

date

Wednesday, October 17, 2018
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

CSTPR Conference Room

Event Type

CSTPR

resources

2018-10-17
 
USGS Scientist Melanie Vanderhoof: Exploring multi-source remote sensing approaches to evaluate ecosystem dynamics

USGS Scientist Melanie Vanderhoof: Exploring multi-source remote sensing approaches to evaluate ecosystem dynamics

Exploring multi-source remote sensing approaches to evaluate ecosystem dynamics

Melanie Vanderhoof, Geoscience and Environmental Change Science Center, USGS

As diverse sources of satellite imagery become increasingly available, so do opportunities for multi-source remote sensing analysis. M. Vanderhoof plans to share an overview of several recent and diverse projects including analyses focused on post-fire regeneration, wetland connectivity, and riparian condition in which multiple imagery sources were either integrated or used in a hierarchical manner. She welcomes discussion of the challenges and opportunities of integrating diverse satellite data sources.

Please join us from 1-2 pm on Wednesday, October 17th in SEEC S225!

date

Wednesday, October 17, 2018
1:00am to 2:00am

Event Type

Seminar
2018-10-17
 
 
 
 
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Atmospheric Chemistry Seminar

Atmospheric Chemistry Seminar

Chemistry of Organic Compounds in the Atmosphere and Indoor Air, by Prof. Paul Ziemann, ANYL Chem Faculty, CU Boulder, and Recent Results and Upcoming Projects Investigating Aerosol Sources, Properties, Processes, and Fate, by Prof. Jose L. Jimenez,
ANYL Chem Faculty, CU Boulder

Paul Ziemann: Laboratory studies provide much of the fundamental data on reaction kinetics, products, and mechanisms that are needed to understand atmospheric and indoor air chemistry and to develop models that are used to establish air quality regulations and predict the effects of human activities. Research in my laboratory focuses primarily on environmental chamber studies of the atmospheric chemistry of organic compounds emitted from natural and anthropogenic sources and the physical and chemical processes by which oxidized organic reaction products form aerosol particles. In addition to this we have recently conducted a number of studies of indoor air chemistry at CU. In this talk I will describe how we conduct the studies by using a diverse array of measurement techniques.

Jose Jimenez: Organic aerosols (OA) account for about 1/2 of the submicron particle mass in the atmosphere leading to important impacts on climate, human health, and other issues, but their sources, properties, and evolution remain poorly understood. In this talk I will present an overview and highlights of research on OA instrumentation, measurements, and modeling by our group over the last year, as well as of upcoming projects of potential interest to 1st year students.

Ongoing projects include global aerosol measurements and analysis as part of the NASA ATom project, which recently sampled (almost) pole-to-pole across the vertical profile. Model comparisons suggest the importance of fast OA removal channels, and a strong overestimation of primary OA in some models. Remote aerosols are very acidic with a typical pH ~ 0, which is significantly lower than predicted by global models. We are also performing a meta-analysis of urban SOA at megacities worldwide, which shows remarkably consistent results and allows us to more accurately estimate the global number of deaths due to this source. Other topics that we are working on, and that I will touch on as time permits, are RO2 chemistry in Oxidation Flow Reactors (OFR) and how it compares with large chambers and the atmosphere; gas/particle partitioning in the laboratory for different types of seed particles; the impact of different types of tubing and instruments on the measurement of intermediate volatility and semivolatile species; the sources and budget of organic carbon in indoor air; and the development of fast SOA parameterizations for global and climate models.

Some upcoming projects include include the study of emissions and chemical evolution of smoke from real fires in the western US with the NASA DC8 (NASA FIREX-AQ) with AMS and soft-ionization EESI-TOF; an upcoming indoor campaign at a weight room at the CU Athletic Dept; and potentially the CalNexT ground-based study of urban chemistry in Los Angeles (which follows up on the highly successful CalNex-2010 study).

date

Monday, October 22, 2018
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

Ekeley S274

Event Type

Seminar

contact

Anne Handschy, Anne.Handschy@colorado.edu
2018-10-22
 
CMC Oct 2018 Meeting

CMC Oct 2018 Meeting

Attendance

  • Mistia Zuckerman, CMC chair (NSIDC)
  • Jonathan Kofler, Secretary (GMD)
  • Mimi Hughes, (PSD)
  • Alessandro Franchin (CSD)
  • Eric Adamson (SWPC)
  • Hazel Bain (SWPC)
  • Nate Campbell (CIRES Admin)
  • Gaby Petron (GMD)
  • Aaron Sweeney (NCEI)
  • Joe Katich (CSD)
  • Adam Woods (NCEI)
  • Don Heinzeller (GSD)
  • Amanda Morton (Admin/Outreach)
  • Chelsea Thompson (CSD)
  • Eric James (GSD)
  • Michael Toy (GSD)
  • Candida F Dewes (PSD)

10/22/2018 - 12:09 pm – The meeting was called to order at GB124 NOAA Building

Pre-Agenda Discussions

The question arose, when does the meeting start?  Previous meetings when there was food, the meeting started after eating.  Do meetings without food start promptly at 12? After a little discussion Mistia decides it should be made clear prior to the meeting.

A question arose about meal compensation and conversation ensued. Mimi says the meal cost is not covered because the CMC meeting is not an “official” event, which leads Gaby Petron ato ask if the CMC is an official body? And expresses that she does not want to be a member if it is not.  This point was left unresolved, and will be revisited at the next meeting. Nate arrives later and clarifies that the compensation is $500/year for officers and $300/year for standard members. As chair Mistia offers to cover to use her compensation as Chair to cover additional visitors lunch costs.

Update on Foreign national spouse work permit issue

Alessandro’s update on J1 housing agenda.  People who are hired by CIRES get a J1 visa if they are non-national.  If their spouse gets a J2 visa and a work permit to work (which is connected to the partners J1 visa), a problem arises when the J1 Visa needs to be renewed because of a lag (~3 months) in the renewal of the J2 person work permit. Proposal: To ask CIRES and ISSS to carry out the paperwork in advance of the J2 work permit by three months.  Alessandro spoke to John Rush who is aware of the issue and interested and willing to help but is too busy to address it right now.

Mimi raises the question of what Other Foreign national issues might there be?  Is the visa issue only one of many issues for foreign nationals on visas?

Someone suggests sending out an email to our groups to identify foreign nationals to see what issues they might be having.

Housing

Nathan Campbell spoke with Alfred Flores (Associate Director - Apartment Life from Housing and Dining Services).  Alfred explained that University housing is currently 40% graduate student populated and the University wants to up that number.   Housing for all campus employees is currently being discussed by University President and directors. Now would be a good time for Waleed to bring CIRES concerns and interests to the President and directors.  The main issue(s) from previous meetings and refreshed in this meeting is that the University housing is only guaranteed for 2 year blocks, which may not align well with say a 3 year contract, or be long enough for a CIRES worker in early career or a postdoc position.  Having flexible lease durations beyond 2 years would be beneficial because of the high cost of living in and close to Boulder. Eric Adamson volunteers to help Alessandro understand the housing issues for CIRES and what to campaign for. Information gathering is needed.   For example, for how many people has the housing been an issue, particularly the early career.

Motion: To bring housing issues up to Waleed
Motion approved by a majority

Meeting Notification

How should we notify CIRES members of the meetings? After discussion of possibly having a google calendar event that goes to every one or sending emails to our clusters, it is concluded that each cluster representative will decide how to disseminate the meeting announcement to their cluster.

CIRES culture survey.

Susan Sullivan is making rounds and presenting the results.  A number of presentations will be given next week.

CMC minutes

Is it in the bylaws whether they should be voted on or approved before releasing them?  If not, should we have a different process. After some discussion it is concluded that if it is not in the bylaws (Jon Kofler and Gaby Petron will check), it might be best to have a google doc, that can be edited, and after a set amount of time that the notes are available for review and editing, the notes can be released (/uploaded to CMC events archives)

CIRES mentoring program update.  

Mimi reports that Waleed has not responded to the proposal (sent to him in an email) yet and Christine Wiedinmyer is tasked with reminding him.  A proposal is written, but the program details and infrastructure will need to be developed yet. The program will borrow from other programs like mentoring365, but will not only be for early career but mid career and cover a variety of subjects.   Mentees and mentors will be paired through matching software. Mentor Training would lie outside the program and be available to people not participating in the program.

Other

Gabrielle Petron asks how are issues and agenda items decided.  Mistia explains CMC and/or CIRES members bring them up at the meetings.

Gabrielle asks if new hires are informed about the CMC?  Do they get a handout about the CMC? Nathan Campbell says it is not part of a handout because new hires are inundated with an excess of information.

date

Monday, October 22, 2018
12:00pm to 2:00pm
2018-10-22
 
 
ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC Weekly Coffee

date

Wednesday, October 24, 2018
9:00am

location

Ekeley W230

contact

Ashley.Olson@colorado.edu
2018-10-24
 
Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

From the Arctic to the Antarctic (and the Andes in between): a latitudinal study of light absorbing impurities in snow in 2018 by Dr. Alia Khan, Postdoctoral Research Associate at NSIDC

ABSTRACT:  Deposition of light absorbing aerosols in the cryosphere, such as black carbon (BC), reduce surface albedo and enhance melt. The radiative forcing attributable to BC deposition in the cryosphere is currently reported with 90% uncertainty bounds and it is not currently possible to detect BC in snow via satellite remote sensing.  Therefore, ground observations of BC concentrations in surface snow and ice remain the primary pathway to further refine our understanding of the impacts of BC on the cryosphere.  Rather than an in-depth science talk, this presentation will be a broad recap of science objectives and a photo slideshow of fieldwork across a large latitudinal gradient in 2018 including snow sampling and spectral albedo measurements from King George Island in Antarctica, Arctic Sea Ice (via the KOPRI-ARAON) and Svalbard in the Arctic, and volcanos and national parks in the Chilean Andes.

TO JOIN BY ZOOM:
From a computer: https://cuboulder.zoom.us/j/5409618610  
Or iPhone one-tap :
    US: +16465588656,,5409618610#  
Or Telephone:
    Dial(for higher quality, dial a number based on your current location): 
        US: +1 646 558 8656  
    Meeting ID: 540 961 8610

date

Wednesday, October 24, 2018
11:00am to 12:00pm
MST

location

NSIDC, RL-2, Room 155/153

Event Type

NSIDC

contact

Mistia Zuckerman

2018-10-24
 
CSTPR Noontime Seminar

CSTPR Noontime Seminar

Climate change scientists as policy advocates?: Navigating the tensions between scientific independence, poor policy, and avoiding a dangerous world
by Lydia Messling, Leverhulme Trust Doctoral Scholar, University of Reading

This talk will be available via live webcast. To view the live webcast please go to Adobe Connect and login as a guest.

Lydia Lydia Messling's research is exploring how climate change researchers should engage in advocacy, if at all, when communicating with policy makers and the lay public. The work she does is interdisciplinary (borrowing from political theory, social science, ethics, psychology and sometimes a few others) and combines political theory with empirical qualitative research. In this talk, Lydia will set out where she thinks the key tensions lie when climate change scientists communicate with other non-experts through the lens of different communication roles that they can take. She will also share some of the early findings from her empirical research where scientists have described practical ways in which they navigate and manage those tensions. 

Lydia is a Leverhulme Trust Doctoral Scholar in Climate Justice, and is based at the University of Reading, U.K. Her research is exploring how climate change researchers should engage in advocacy, if at all, when communicating with policy makers and the lay public. Lydia's project uses both political theory and empirical research to examine the frames and methods of communication that researchers use to explain their findings to non-experts, and how they navigate communicating uncertainties whilst providing useful information for policy makers. It is widely valued that science should be politically neutral, independent and objective. Advocacy has the potential to undermine public trust and damage the scientific integrity of scientists' work by being at odds with these values. However climate change is an issue that requires urgent action. The stakes are high, the risks and uncertainties are difficult to comprehend, and advocacy for coordinated social action is vital. But should climate change researchers engage in this advocacy? Or is this outside of their remit?

date

Wednesday, October 24, 2018
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

CSTPR Conference Room

Event Type

CSTPR

resources

2018-10-24
 
Special Seminar

Special Seminar

Forest Mapping from Remote Sensing – the journey from research to operational mapping by Iain H Woodhouse, Professor of Applied Earth Observation, The University of Edinburgh, and CEO of Carbomap.

Iain has spent the last 25 years developing techniques for active remote sensing of forests, and the most recent 10 of those years looking at ways to operationalise those methods. In this talk, he will provide two recent examples of new developments he has been involved in with collaborators in Edinburgh.

The first example is the use of Sentinel-1 SAR data to map forest disturbance. Utilising the high repeat rate (every 6 days) of Sentinel, it is possible to use coherent change detection to monitor forest change. The method developed is now being implemented into operational storm damage assessment by the Scottish Government and the Forestry Commission.

The second example describes the challenge of developing the use of LiDAR on ultra-long range UAVs, and shares some results from the first demonstration of this capability. The project was able to prove that a long range (1120km) fixed-wing platform can carry and operate a RIEGL VUX-1UAV and generate high quality point clouds.

In addition to discussing the technical challenges of active remote sensing for forest mapping, Iain will also share some experiences and reflections on the challenges of the business and commercial side of remote sensing, and the difficulties of spinning-out companies from a university and then making them successful in the rapidly growing satellite-applications market.

date

Thursday, October 25, 2018
4:00pm

location

CIRES 338

Event Type

Seminar

contact

David Gallaher, david.gallaher@nsidc.org
2018-10-25
 
 
 
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Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Non-Targeted Chemical Characterization of Waterpipe Tobacco Smoke by GC-MS and LC-MS by Andrew Jensen,
ANYL 1st year student

"As smoking waterpipes becomes more popular, it becomes necessary to understand the chemical composition of waterpipe tobacco smoke (WTS) and its impacts on human health. Current studies target known components of cigarette smoke, but no current studies acknowledge the possible differences due to the tobacco product and heating profile. The tobacco product, shisha, is made up of tobacco leaves coated in syrup which itself is about one-third glycerol. The shisha is then heated using charcoal, producing larger pyrolysis products. The resulting smoke generated from these constituents can be divided into particulate matter (PM) and vapor. Each fraction may contribute differently to smoke toxicity, making it important to understand the chemical contributions of each constituent. These constituents were studied using gas and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry with a non-targeted approach.

A semi-quantitative comparison of the chromatograms allows for the identification of the sources and sinks of certain compounds in WTS. The GC-MS chromatograms of the shisha, bowl water, PM, and vapor suggest no significant portion of the WTS is trapped by the bowl-water, contrary to popular belief that the water acts as a significant filter. In the LC-MS chromatograms, charcoal alone contributes 10 chromatographic peaks while glycerol, syrup, and shisha each contribute 5, 11, and 32 peaks respectively. A similar comparison of the shisha PM and vapor chromatograms shows that the vapor phase contributes 2 unique peaks while the PM contributes 43 peaks and 11 peaks are shared between the two phases. This study has begun the process of identifying the unique chemical characteristics of the individual sources and sinks of WTS. Toxicity studies can identify WTS fractions of interest, then the unique compounds in these fractions can be isolated by the methods presented in this study."

and

Experimental and Theoretical Studies in the Gas Phase Kinetics of Atomic Halides with Methacrolein and Alkyl Bromides by Kyle Mackey, ANYL 1st year student

"In the studies conducted by the Wine Group the rate coefficients of the reactions of bromine radicals with methacrolein and chlorine radicals with several alkyl bromides were determined using the laser flash photolysis - resonance fluorescence technique as a function of temperature and pressure for use in atmospheric modeling and calculations."

date

Monday, October 29, 2018
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

Ekeley S274

contact

Anne.Handschy@Colorado.EDU
2018-10-29
 
 
CSTPR Noontime Seminar

CSTPR Noontime Seminar

Fracking and technological momentum: Risks, hazards and features of the oil and gas extraction system in Colorado
by David Oonk, CSTPR and ATLAS Institute, University of Colorado

This talk will be available via live webcast. To view the live webcast please go to Adobe Connect and login as a guest.

The recent extraction of tight oil and gas resources in the United States has been responsible for a domestic production boom in the last two decades. The ‘frackers’ were able to combine the technologies of hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling and innovate further to increase the output, efficiency and speed of production. These extraction technologies have changed the landscape of fossil fuel extraction where oil and gas fields are peppered with thousands of dispersed wells intermixed with communities – which have created novel conflicts between extraction and communities and raised critical questions of the technology’s appropriate use. This research applies a theory of socio-technical systems to understand tight oil and gas extraction at the meso-scale (i.e. Denver Julesburg Basin in northern Colorado), as a means to understand the complex relationship between technical and social features of the system, the motivations and goals of the system, and the hidden conflicts they create. The influences of the system can dictate how we conceptualize the system’s risk, the distribution of that risk and how we make decisions about it. Two avenues in which a system can exercise influence on decision-making spaces is by increasing the authority of scientific and technical expertise in defining risk of these technologies and the reducing the efficacy of outside stakeholders. Through this frame this research aims to better illuminate the relationship between the modern oil and gas extraction system and the society in which it’s nested and explore critical questions of the system’s risk and future as an energy source.

David Oonk David Oonk’s research focuses on oil and gas development and policy in Colorado. He researches the dynamics and practices of horizontal drilling and ‘fracking’ technologies, the governance problems they create, and the role of science in assessing their risk and influence policy-making. He has experience designing programs and conducting research in environmental science communication and education using visual media and art. He is advised by Max Boykoff faculty in Department of Environmental Studies and Director of the Center for Science and Technology Policy Research (CSTPR).

date

Wednesday, October 31, 2018
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

CSTPR Conference Room

Event Type

CSTPR

resources

2018-10-31
 
Chemistry PhD Defense

Chemistry PhD Defense

Dissertation Defense: Demetrios Pagonis, Influence of multiphase processes on the chemistry and measurement of organic compounds in indoor and outdoor environments
ANYL student, Ziemann Lab, CU Boulder
 

"Organic compounds are ubiquitous in indoor and outdoor environments, with organic aerosols and gases impacting air quality, global climate, and human health. The life cycle of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere includes emission from indoor and outdoor sources, oxidation in the atmosphere to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA), and eventual deposition to a surface. Understanding each of these processes is necessary to predict the impact of organic compounds on indoor and outdoor environments, and this thesis presents the results of a series of studies across the life cycle of VOCs, examining the chemical and physical processes that transform organic compounds in the atmosphere.

First, the chemistry of multifunctional hydroperoxides in SOA is studied by a series of laboratory studies utilizing a model hydroperoxyaldehyde designed to represent the highly oxidized multifunctional compounds that impact SOA growth in pristine environments. Measurements of reaction rates, equilibrium constants, and decomposition mechanisms provide insight into how chemical structure and aerosol properties affect the chemistry of multifunctional hydroperoxides in SOA. Second, emission rates, deposition velocities, reaction rates, and reaction products from a field study in a university art museum are presented. This study quantifies the significant impact of human activities on indoor VOC emissions, as well as the effect of indoor surfaces and indoor oxidants on the fate of those emissions. Lastly, this thesis presents a study aimed to improve researchers’ ability to make time-resolved measurements of gas-phase organic compounds that partition to instrument surfaces and to Teflon tubing commonly used for sampling lines. The simple chromatography model presented here accurately predicts the delay in instrument response caused by gas-surface partitioning across all the tubing lengths, diameters, flow rates, and analytes tested. Together, the studies presented in this thesis advance the understanding of, and the ability to measure, the fate of organic compounds in indoor and outdoor environments."

date

Wednesday, October 31, 2018
2:00pm to 3:00pm

location

CIRES Auditorium

contact

Anne.Handschy@Colorado.EDU
2018-10-31