Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences



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Local responses to disasters in Peru and Puerto Rico: An approach from zero-order responders

Local responses to disasters in Peru and Puerto Rico: An approach from zero-order responders

Local responses to disasters in Peru and Puerto Rico: An approach from zero-order responders
by Fernando Briones, Consortium for Capacity Building, Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research

This talk will be available via live webcast. To view the live webcast please go to Adobe Connect and login as a guest.

Briones Fernando Briones is a Research Associate at Consortium for Capacity Building (Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research) of the University of Colorado, Boulder. He holds a PhD in Social Anthropology from The School for Advanced Studies in Social Sciences (École des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales), Paris, France.

He has been consultant and researcher in Mexico, collaborator and lecturer of international organizations in Latin America such as FAO, UNDP and ECLAC. He is a member of the Scientific Advisory Committee for National Coordination of Civil Protection of Mexico, and a member of the National System of Researchers of The National Council of Science and Technology of Mexico.

His work focuses on disaster risk reduction, the understanding of risk perception, social vulnerability, resilience and the applicability of public policies on climate change adaptation. His articles, books and scientific reports have been mainly developed with research in Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, Peru and Central America.

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Wednesday, October 17, 2018
12:00pm to 1:00pm

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CSTPR Conference Room

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CSTPR

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2018-10-17
 
 
 
 
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Climate change scientists as policy advocates?: Navigating the tensions between scientific independence, poor policy, and avoiding a dangerous world

Climate change scientists as policy advocates?: Navigating the tensions between scientific independence, poor policy, and avoiding a dangerous world

Climate change scientists as policy advocates?: Navigating the tensions between scientific independence, poor policy, and avoiding a dangerous world
by Lydia Messling, Leverhulme Trust Doctoral Scholar, University of Reading

This talk will be available via live webcast. To view the live webcast please go to Adobe Connect and login as a guest.

Lydia Lydia Messling is a Leverhulme Trust Doctoral Scholar in Climate Justice, and is based at the University of Reading, U.K. Her research is exploring how climate change researchers should engage in advocacy, if at all, when communicating with policy makers and the lay public. Lydia's project uses both political theory and empirical research to examine the frames and methods of communication that researchers use to explain their findings to non-experts, and how they navigate communicating uncertainties whilst providing useful information for policy makers. It is widely valued that science should be politically neutral, independent and objective. Advocacy has the potential to undermine public trust and damage the scientific integrity of scientists' work by being at odds with these values. However climate change is an issue that requires urgent action. The stakes are high, the risks and uncertainties are difficult to comprehend, and advocacy for coordinated social action is vital. But should climate change researchers engage in this advocacy? Or is this outside of their remit?

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Wednesday, October 24, 2018
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

CSTPR Conference Room

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CSTPR

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2018-10-24
 
 
 
 
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Fracking and technological momentum: Risks, hazards and features of the oil and gas extraction system in Colorado

Fracking and technological momentum: Risks, hazards and features of the oil and gas extraction system in Colorado

Fracking and technological momentum: Risks, hazards and features of the oil and gas extraction system in Colorado
by David Oonk, CSTPR and ATLAS Institute, University of Colorado

This talk will be available via live webcast. To view the live webcast please go to Adobe Connect and login as a guest.

David Oonk David Oonk’s research focuses on oil and gas development and policy in Colorado. He researches the dynamics and practices of horizontal drilling and ‘fracking’ technologies, the governance problems they create, and the role of science in assessing their risk and influence policy-making. He has experience designing programs and conducting research in environmental science communication and education using visual media and art. He is advised by Max Boykoff faculty in Department of Environmental Studies and Director of the Center for Science and Technology Policy Research (CSTPR).

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Wednesday, October 31, 2018
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

CSTPR Conference Room

Event Type

CSTPR

resources

2018-10-31