Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences



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Distinguished Lecture Series: Dr. Maria T. Zuber

Distinguished Lecture Series: Dr. Maria T. Zuber

Title: “The Crust of the Moon and Implications for Early Planetary Evolution”

Abstract: Thanks to the low-orbiting Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) spacecraft, the structure of the lunar crust has been mapped at higher resolution than any planet beyond Earth. Because the Moon has retained its primordial crust, it preserves the record of tectonics, volcanism and impact bombardment dating from shortly after the time of crustal formation. This is the time that life initially emerged on Earth, where the earliest crustal record is very poorly maintained. This presentation will provide an integrated view of lunar crustal structure and make inferences about the implications for the early evolution of other terrestrial planets.


Maria Zuber is the E. A. Griswold Professor of Geophysics and Vice President for Research at MIT, where she is responsible for research administration and policy.

She oversees MIT Lincoln Laboratory and more than a dozen interdisciplinary research laboratories and centers, including the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, the MIT Energy and Environmental Solutions Initiatives, the Plasma Science and Fusion Center, the Research Laboratory of Electronics, the Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies, and Haystack Observatory. Vice President Zuber is also responsible for intellectual property and research integrity and compliance, as well as research relationships with the federal government.

Zuber’s research bridges planetary geophysics and the technology of space‐based laser and radio systems. Since 1990, she has held leadership roles associated with scientificexperiments or instrumentation on ten NASA missions, most notably serving as Principal Investigator of the Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission.

Zuber holds a B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania and an Sc.M. and Ph.D. from Brown. She has won numerous awards including the MIT James R. Killian Jr. Faculty Achievement Award, the highest honor the MIT faculty bestows to one of its own. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Philosophical Society, and is a fellow for the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association forthe Advancement of Science, the Geological Society and the American Geophysical Union.

Vice President Zuber is the first woman to lead a science department at MIT and the first to lead a NASA planetary mission. In 2004, she served on the Presidential Commission on the Implementation of United States Space Exploration Policy. In 2002 Discover magazine named her one of the 50 most important women in science and, in 2008, she was named to the USNews/Harvard Kennedy School List of America’s BestLeaders. In 2013, President Obama appointed her to the National Science Board, and in 2016 she was elected Board Chair, a position she held until 2018.

date

Thursday, November 1, 2018
4:00pm

location

CIRES Auditorium, Room 338

Event Type

DLS

resources

2018-11-01
 
 
 
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Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

OMI and TROPOMI: towards high resolution Air Quality and Emission monitoring by Pieternel Levelt,
KNMI and University of Technology Delft

"The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), launched on board of NASA’s EOS-Aura spacecraft on July 15, 2004, provides unique contributions to air quality monitoring from Space. The combination of urban scale resolution (13 x 24 km 2 in nadir) and daily global coverage proved to be key features for the air quality community. The OMI data is currently used operationally for improving the air quality forecasts, for inverting high-resolution emission maps, UV forecast and volcanic plume warning systems for aviation. Due to its almost 14 year continuous operation OMI provides the longest NO2 and SO2 record from space, which is essential to understand the changes to emissions globally.

In 2017 Tropospheric Monitoring Instrument (TROPOMI), was launched on board ESA’s Sentinel 5 Precursor satellite in October 2017. TROPOMI has a spatial resolution of 3,5x7 km2 in nadir; a more than 12 times improvement over OMI. The high spatial resolution serves two goals: (1) emissions sources can be detected with even better accuracy and (2) the number of cloud-free ground pixels will increase substantially. TROPOMI will continue OMI’s ozone and air quality trace gas records. Added to that TROPOMI will measure the O2 A band for better cloud detection, as well as CO and the second most important greenhouse gas CH4. TROPOMI will therefore be an important satellite mission for the EU Copernicus atmosphere service and will be followed by ESA’s sentinel 4 and 5 satellites. The first measurements of TROPOMI turn out to be above expectation.

In the coming decades air pollution in megacities will continue to be a major area of concern and the need for timely, high resolution information on emissions will increase, preferably to a level where sources can be isolated on the < 1 x 1 km2 scale. Currently we are working on new follow-on satellite instrumentation with which we envisage to improve emission monitoring to the < 1 x 1 km2 spatial resolution level (TROPOLITE).

An overview of air quality applications, emission inventories, and trend analyses will be given, based on the excellent OMI data record, followed by first measurements and results of the TROPOMI instrument. An outlook will be presented on the potentials of the TROPOMI and what new satellite instrumentation with a 1 x 1 km2 spatial resolution can bring in the air quality and climate domain."

date

Monday, November 5, 2018
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

Ekeley S274

contact

Anne.Handschy@Colorado.EDU
2018-11-05
 
 
Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Rapid 21st century reconfiguration of Greenland Ice Sheet motion and ice edge by Dr. Twila Moon, Research Scientist at NSIDC

ABSTRACT:  Observing the multi-decadal Greenland Ice Sheet response to climate warming is key to understanding the rate and character of ice sheet change. Establishing these records across the full ice sheet, however, has proven challenging. Here, we assess the evolution of Greenland Ice Sheet motion and recession using newly derived velocity records from Landsat satellites (spanning 1985 to 2017) and combined records of glacier ice front retreat (beginning in the early 1970s). Despite earlier access to spatially comprehensive data, the challenge of examining such rich data has meant that most efforts have focused on point (~small area) or profile measurements, treating outlet glaciers as discreet units, or have addressed only portions of the ice sheet. We endeavor to create a more spatially coherent explanation of ice sheet behavior. Furthermore, with this extended record we are able to identify notable trends even in slower moving glaciers. Widespread retreat is evident across the ice sheet, accelerating in the 21st century. There remain no examples of significant outlet glacier advance. Speed responses vary locally and regionally. While some instances of slowing likely reflect stabilizing subglacial topography, many slowing glaciers are adjacent to accelerating glaciers and there is substantial evidence for ice capture and reconfiguration of ice sheet flow. Our observations provide no evidence that rapid reorganization of ice sheet motion is transient and we suggest that projected sustained climate forcing will continue to produce substantial changes in the ice edge location and ice sheet flow field, which are challenging to capture in predictive ice sheet models.

TO JOIN BY ZOOM:
From a computer: https://cuboulder.zoom.us/j/5409618610  
Or iPhone one-tap :
    US: +16465588656,,5409618610#  
Or Telephone:
    Dial(for higher quality, dial a number based on your current location): 
        US: +1 646 558 8656  
    Meeting ID: 540 961 8610

date

Wednesday, November 7, 2018
11:00am to 12:00pm
MST

location

NSIDC, RL-2, Room 155/153

Event Type

NSIDC

contact

Mistia Zuckerman

2018-11-07
 
 
Resume Writing Mixer - Earth Analytics Career Series

Resume Writing Mixer - Earth Analytics Career Series

Earth Lab invites you to a Resume Writing Mixer an Earth Analytics Career Series on November 9th, from 3-4:30pm in SEEC S372.

If you chose to attend, you will need to bring a recent copy of your resume. The room will break out into small groups with one seasoned earth science hiring manager in each. They will review each participant’s resume and answer any other career related questions. Panelists will shift to new group every 10 minutes and review a new participant’s resume. The goal is for participants to learn what potential employers see when scanning their resume quickly.

Experts will include:

  • Linda Rowan – External Affairs Director, UNAVCO
  • James Sill – Solutions Engineer, ESRI
  • Brian Johnson – Analytics Hub Director, CU Boulder Earth Lab
  • Amanda O’Connor – Commercial Sales Manager, Harris Geospatial
  • Shelley Petroy - Earth Sciences Business Development Manager, Ball Aerospace

To register please RSVP using this form by noon on Wednesday 11/7. The form will close once event capacity is reached, which may be before that deadline, so RSVP as soon as you’re able. If you RSVP and can no longer attend, please email earth.lab@colorado.edu.

Hope to see you there!

date

Friday, November 9, 2018
3:00pm to 4:30pm
Mountain Time

Event Type

Seminar
2018-11-09
 
 
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CIRES Director Town Hall

CIRES Director Town Hall

CIRES Director's Town Hall at NOAA
Tues, November 13
10 am 
GC402, David Skaggs Research Center

date

Tuesday, November 13, 2018
10:00am

location

DSRC, GC402
2018-11-13
 
UArctic and CU Info Session

UArctic and CU Info Session

There’s an untapped community of Arctic researchers waiting for you!

The University of Colorado has been accepted into the University of the Arctic and has a system-wide membership that provides valuable connections and resources to the CU community.

Through this membership, you have access to Arctic research events, a global research community representing a range of disciplines—from the humanities and social sciences to natural sciences and medicine, and a platform for sharing your research and its applications.

Learn more about how to take advantage of this valuable membership at an interactive UArctic presentation by Deborah Keyek-Franssen, Ph.D., Associate Vice President of Digital Education and Engagement at the CU System and Jay Lemery, M.D., Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine and Chief, Section of Wilderness and Environmental Medicine, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.

 

Learn more: https://www.uarctic.org/

 

We will livestream this presentation! View here: http://cirescolorado.adobeconnect.com/uarctic-11-13-2018/

date

Tuesday, November 13, 2018
2:30pm to 3:30pm

location

CIRES Auditorium

contact

heidi.mccann@nsidc.org
2018-11-13
 
CIRES Director's Town Hall

CIRES Director's Town Hall

CIRES Director's Town Hall at East Campus
Wednesday, November 14
2:30 pm
RL-2, Room 155

date

Wednesday, November 14, 2018
2:30pm

location

contact

lornay.hansen@colorado.edu
2018-11-14
 
CIRES Director's Town Hall

CIRES Director's Town Hall

CIRES Director's Town Hall 
Main Campus
Thurs, November 15
10 am 
CIRES Auditorium

date

Thursday, November 15, 2018
10:00am

location

contact

lornay.hansen@colorado.edu
2018-11-15
 
CIRES IRP Poster Session and Reception

CIRES IRP Poster Session and Reception

This poster session and reception will feature the research results of the 2017 IRP winners, listed below. Light refreshments and beverages will be served.

The Innovative Research Program (IRP) is an internal CIRES competition designed to stimulate a creative research environment within CIRES and to encourage synergy between disciplines and research colleagues. The program encourages novel, unconventional or fundamental research that might otherwise be difficult to fund. CIRES-wide competitions are conducted each year to foster an innovative research environment where risk taking is allowed and even encouraged.

2017 IRP Recipients: 
 
Pliocene temperatures from the tropics: the Eastern Cordillera of Colombia
Investigators: Lina Perez-Angel, Peter Molnar
 
Novel particulate aerosol sampling design capable of withstanding high winds in polar and high mountain regions
Investigators: Mark Serreze, Alia Khan
 
Toward a more comprehensive picture of snowpack evolution through the integration of time-lapse photography, high-resolution snow modeling, lidar data, and in situ observations
Investigators: Jeffery Deems, Mark Raleigh
 
Direct spectroscopic detection of tropospheric chlorine radicals
Investigators: Andrew Rollins, Joshua Schwarz 
 
Estimating temporal variations in ocean circulation using magnetic satellite data
Investigators: Manoj Nair, Neesha Schnepf
 
Combining satellite and acoustic remote sensing data with a numerical model to characterize the vertical structure of marine ecosystems
Investigators: Kristopher Karnauskas, Carrie Wall
 
Citizen science, showerheads, and the ecology of an emerging disease
Investigators: Noah Fierer, Matt Gerbert

Nowcasting Geoelectric Hazard on United States Power Grid
Investigators: Anne Sheehan, Daniel Feucht
 
Application of computer vision to Earth Science problems: An initial application using 3D scene reconstruction and image velocimetry to estimate surface water velocities in rivers
Investigators: J. Toby Minear, Christoffer Heckman, Robert Anderson

date

Thursday, November 15, 2018
4:30pm

location

Amenities

Refreshments provided

contact

linda.pendergrass@colorado.edu
2018-11-15
 
CIRES Education & Outreach Middle School Film Screening

CIRES Education & Outreach Middle School Film Screening

Join CIRES Education & Outreach Friday, November 16 for a film screening of short community environmental action movies produced by 6th, 7th and 8th graders from Platt Choice Middle School. They completed a project to explore climate/environmental actions through filmmaking, a partnership between CIRES E&O and Boulder Valley School District.

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Friday, November 16, 2018
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

contact

erin.leckey@colorado.edu
2018-11-16
 
 
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AAAS "Catalyzing advocacy in science and engineering" workshop student competition panel discussion

AAAS "Catalyzing advocacy in science and engineering" workshop student competition panel discussion

AAAS "Catalyzing advocacy in science and engineering" workshop student competition panel discussion

This talk will be available via live webcast. To view the live webcast please go to Adobe Connect and login as a guest.

Past competition winners, Julia Bakker-Arkema, Kaitlin McCreery, Adalyn Fyhrie, and Nicholas Valcourt
Moderator: Heather Bené, University of Colorado Office of Government Relations 

date

Wednesday, November 28, 2018
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

CSTPR Conference Room

Event Type

CSTPR

resources

2018-11-28