Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences



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Special Seminar: Jennifer Balch

Special Seminar: Jennifer Balch

The human imprint on modern fire regimes

Jennifer Balch

Assistant Professor of Geography, Director of Earth Lab, University Director of North Central Climate Adaptation Science Center

Monday, December 3, 12:00 noon, CIRES Auditorium

Dr. Balch’s research aims to understand the patterns and processes that underlie disturbance and ecosystem recovery, particularly how people are shifting fire regimes and the consequences. There are three ingredients needed for fire: fuel to burn, hot & dry conditions, and an ignition source. Dr. Balch’s research explores how people are changing all three. Her work spans from temperate regions to the tropics exploring how fire encourages non-native grass invasion, alters rainforests, and affects the global climate. Prior to the University of Colorado, she was on the faculty at the Pennsylvania State University. She was a Postdoctoral Associate at the U.S.-based National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, and received her Ph.D. from Yale University’s School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. She has conducted research in the field of fire ecology for over fifteen years, and has lit a few experimental burns to understand the consequences of altered fire regimes.

Watch the livestream here: https://cirescolorado.adobeconnect.com/_a1166535166/balch-12-03-2018/

date

Monday, December 3, 2018
12:00pm

location

CIRES 338

Event Type

Seminar

contact

lornay.hansen@colorado.edu
2018-12-03
 
Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Hydroxyl radical reactivity: Results from field campaigns in Europe and China by Hendrik Fuchs, Forschungszentrum Jülich,
Institute of Energy and Climate Research, Troposphere (IEK-8)

"OH reactivity is the total loss rate coefficient of the hydroxyl radical (OH), the main responsible agent for the oxidation of pollutants in the atmosphere. The direct measurement of this quantity is of great value as it constrains the removal rate of OH in the analysis of the atmospheric budget of OH radicals. In addition, measured OH reactivity can be compared to calculations from individual OH reactant concentration measurements in order to quantify the importance of unmeasured OH reactants. OH reactivity measurements were done on a Zeppelin airship during flights over Europe showing the vertical and horizontal distribution of OH reactants. Ground-based field campaigns in the North China Plain and the Yangtze River Delta in summer- and wintertime were performed between 2006 and 2016 giving an overview of the major OH reactants that contribute to air pollution in China."

date

Monday, December 3, 2018
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

Ekeley S274

contact

Anne.Handschy@Colorado.EDU
2018-12-03
 
 
 
 
Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

TROPOMI on-board the Sentinel-5 Precursor mission: a game changer for tropospheric composition monitoring from space by Michel van Roozendael,
Royal Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy

"The Sentinel-5 Precursor (S5P) is the first atmospheric composition monitoring satellite in the Copernicus Sentinel series operated by EU. Successfully launched on 13 October 2017, it carries the Tropospheric Monitoring Instrument (TROPOMI), which provides daily global observations of the nadir backscattered earthshine radiance in 3 spectral channels covering the UV, VIS, NIR and SWIR regions at the unprecedented horizontal resolution of 7x3.5 km2. BIRA-IASB has been involved in the mission preparation since early 2010 and is responsible for the algorithm baseline definition and maintenance of the tropospheric HCHO, SO2 and total ozone, as well as the operational validation as part of the S5P Mission Performance Center (MPC). After a brief introduction on the mission, instrument characteristics and retrieval methods, I focus on results obtained after one year of measurements with particular attention to species retrieved in the UV-Visible spectral range. Observations reveal the distribution of tropospheric species in unprecedented detail, allowing for a much more accurate identification of pollution sources at the level of cities, and various local emission sources both of natural and anthropogenic origin. In many cases, the sensitivity of the instrument exceed the expectations of the involved scientists."

 

Note unusual date and time (pizza will be provided!)
 

date

Friday, December 7, 2018
11:00am to 12:00pm

location

Ekeley S274

Amenities

Refreshments provided

contact

Anne.Handschy@Colorado.EDU
2018-12-07
 
 
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