Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado Boulder



Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
30
31
1
2
3
4
5
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
 
January Monthly Meeting

January Monthly Meeting

Attendance 

  • Mistia Zuckerman, CMC chair (NSIDC)
  • Alessandro Franchin, CMC co-chair (CSD) (remote via zoom)
  • Jonathan Kofler, CMC Secretary (GMD)
  • Carrie Wall (NCEI) (remote via zoom)
  • Eric Adamson (SWPC)
  • Michael Toy (GSD)
  • Eric James (GSD)
  • Nathan Campbell (CIRES Admin)
  • Lucia Harop (Admin)
  • Andrew Badger (Main Campus)
  • Dawn Umpleby (Earth Lab /NC CASC)
  • Mimi Hughes (PSD)
  • Amanda Morton (Outreach)
  • Thomas Legard (GMD)
  • Michael Toy (GSD)

1/14/2019: Location: NSIDC-RL2-155

Pre-meeting discussion:

- future meetings.  Kathmandu on 29th street mall has a room. The Taj is a possibility too.

Meeting called to order at 12:29 pm

CU Family Housing Update

Alessandro reports that he did not prepare a statement to give to Waleed yet, but some work has been done.  Nate started an email with chain to Mike Macfarin, a post-doc on campus who went to extreme lengths to get information including statistics from housing.  The responses were matter-of-fact.  Mike understands the problem limited-term housing creates for some foreign and early career employees and said they are considering changing the term. John Rush provided information about early career pay scale that can be put together with average rent (when that is compiled).  All parties are aware of the problem and no convincing needs to happen.   Results of informal CMC cluster surveys are compiled in a google document and available to CMC members.  Lucia asks if Ale has spoken with Susan Sullivan about this because the issue could affect the diversity of our staff.  He did informally at the beginning, but didn’t follow up, and will loop her back in so that she can provide her input.

Focus Groups

Mistia added this agenda item.  After the culture survey Susan Sullivan introduced focus groups to glean more information than might not have been gleaned in the multiple choice culture survey questionnaire.   She is starting with 3 women focus groups and 3 other focus groups located throughout CIRES to talk about issues specific to those groups.  Lucia raises the question of whether the CMC would want to add focus groups.  Mimi proposes that specific clusters could have their own focus groups.  There could be a focus group for people who are affected by housing.  Concluded that it would be valuable to invite Susan Sullivan to the next CMC meeting.  Action item: Mistia will invite Susan to the next CMC meeting.

2019 Outstanding Performance Awards (OPA) (OPA Chair)

Nate: It is time to send out an email reminder about the OPA’s and test the online application to make sure it is working.  Mimi recommends a contingency plan for if the govt shutdown continues. Discussion: The deadline for application submission could be pushed back if the shutdown continues, but If the deadline gets pushed back, it might be difficult to be able to produce the physical award in time for the Rendezvous, but at least the announcement could be made at the Rendezvous and the award given later.  Carrie Wall: we would like to have some more guidelines such as word count, and examples of good applications from the past (what is expected).  Lucia says that people ask for examples all the time. Mimi: how far back to reach for examples.  Lucia: applications can be resubmitted so that should be considered when choosing examples.  Mimi: If possible ask to include recommendation letters as examples too, which will require permissions. Action item:Carrie Wall will get examples and word counts for field entries to Nate and he will publish it on the website. Mimi: a CIRES person can nominate someone now, but can’t get needed input from the feds.  Verbiage addressing this issue should be included on the application site. CIRESnews@colorado.edu.  Katy Human.  Action item: OPA chair will send out a draft announcement for approval today with the intention of submitting the approved message to the CIRES message center for distribution on Friday.

2019 Rendezvous

The Rendezvous is scheduled for May 17.  Nate will be meeting on Friday with Dawn and Linda about the rendezvous.  After some discussion it is decided that the gender pronoun labels will be included at the check in table instead of at a separate table. The tent on the terrace will be used as usual for the poster session, unless work is being done on the terrace in which case it will need to be relocated, possibly to the north dining hall.

CIRES Mentoring Program Update(Mimi)

The mentoring program committee met with BJ Thompson.  He is happy with the mentoring committees proposal, but he brought up some things.  He didn’t like verbiage about “receiving help when discriminated against or harassed” in the purpose section.  Should mentors be responders/mandatory reporters?  There is a meeting later today with Nate to discuss construction of website for the program, software for matching of mentees and mentors, and hiring a student to help complete those tasks.  Christine Weidemeyer confirmed that Waleed is still in support of the program and there will be money available to pay a student (once the shutdown is lifted).

Onboarding(Mistia)

MIstia reports that she is working on an onboarding procedure for people starting at NSIDC because some aspects have not worked well in the past.  For example, new employees may not have an email address right away after they start.. She wants to make specific onboarding process for NSIDC, for example a scheduled calendar, and list of items for supervisors. She spoke with CU HR and found out that they are on board with on boarding and BJ would be able help with this.  Nate: BJ is working with the onboarding process for CIRES that has items specific to where they are working (main campus, NOAA, SWPC, etc).  The on campus resources are great if you are on campus, but it may not be relevant at other locations.  Dawn says that Earth lab has an onboarding process in place. Nate: one thing BJ is including in onboarding process is a half day of explaining what CIRES is.  His hope is to make everyone aware of what the various parts of CIRES are.  Lucia likes the idea of that information being introduced at a later date, not right away as new employees may already be overwhelmed with other details in the beginning.  Dawn: Earth Lab - a benefits meeting was helpful.   Many people at her organization didn’t know anything about the CIRES organization as a whole.  Lucia: The onboarding process would be a good opportunity for admin integration.  Action Item: Mistia will add onboarding as a CMC agenda item and invite BJ to discuss that at a future CMC meeting.  

Government shutdown(Mistia)

Discussion ensued about whether guidance communications will be coming out in an email soon, and whether a town hall would be helpful.   Questions were raised about if the shutdown continues, how long will funding and pay continue for different CIRES groups.  Mistia: there is work space available at NSIDC.  Lucia - is there another note admin news coming out? People are expected to work full time. Take trainings.   Feds are forbidden to work.  Jon: for some people whose work requires lab space and equipment to work on, it is very difficult to work because their equipment is on site in the NOAA building. Included in an email resources of places people can work would be helpful.  Amanda:  nobody took them up on office space in the last shutdown.  Q: Are we supposed to use email?    Mistia:  The deadline passed for career track promotion during the shutdown yet Feds are forbidden to work 

 

Executive meeting: No December meeting

CIRES Fellows Meeting There was a fellows meeting in December, but 
Antonietta is not at the meeting to report on it.

Meeting is adjourned 154 pm.

date

Monday, January 14, 2019
3:00pm
2019-01-14
 
 
ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC Weekly Coffee

date

Wednesday, January 16, 2019
9:00am to 10:00am

location

ESOC Reading Room (2nd floor Ekeley)

contact

Ashley.Olson@colorado.edu
2019-01-16
 
 
 
 
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
 
 
 
CSTPR Noontime Seminar

CSTPR Noontime Seminar

From the inside out: The fight for environmental justice within government agencies
by Jill Harrison, Department of Sociology, University of Colorado Boulder

This talk will be available via live webcast. To view the live webcast please go to Adobe Connect and login as a guest.

In this talk, I present key findings from my current book project, From the Inside Out: The Fight for Environmental Justice within Government Agencies (forthcoming MIT Press, fall 2019). In this book, I lift the veil on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and other environmental regulatory agencies to offer new insights into why they fail to reduce harmful toxics and other hazards in our nation’s most environmentally overburdened and vulnerable communities. The book examines the disappointing pace of environmental regulatory agencies’ “environmental justice” (EJ) programs and policies as a case through which to understand why, despite reducing air and water pollution for the nation overall, government has not protected the communities who suffer the most. Other scholars have shown that budget cuts, industry pressure, weak policy, and other factors outside the control of agency staff constrain the possibilities for EJ reforms to regulatory practice. This book shows that agencies’ EJ efforts are also undermined by elements of regulatory workplace culture. Through extensive interviews with and observations of staff at numerous environmental regulatory agencies across the United States, I show that agencies’ EJ efforts are undermined by ways in which staff define the goals and priorities of the organizations they work for and to which they feel very committed.

Bio: Jill Lindsey Harrison is Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Her research focuses on environmental sociology, sociology of agriculture and food systems, environmental justice, political theories of justice, and immigration politics. She has used her research on political conflict over agricultural pesticide poisonings in California, recent escalations in immigration enforcement in rural Wisconsin, and government agencies’ environmental justice efforts to identify and explain the persistence of environmental inequalities and workplace inequalities in the United States today. She is especially interested in how people are able to make highly inequitable outcomes seem reasonable.

date

Wednesday, January 23, 2019
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

CSTPR Conference Room

Event Type

CSTPR

resources

2019-01-23
 
ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC Weekly Coffee

date

Wednesday, January 23, 2019
9:00am to 10:00am

location

ESOC Reading Room (2nd floor Ekeley)

contact

Ashley.Olson@colorado.edu
2019-01-23
 
Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Blew swayed spruce: what can trees blowing in the wind tell us about how much snow is in the canopy?​ by Dr. Mark Raleigh, Research Scientist at NSIDC

Abstract:  Forest canopies influence the accumulation and persistence of snowpack on the ground, with the net effect depending on climate and forest characteristics. New snowfall intercepted in forest canopies may sublimate or melt, thereby reducing snow accumulation on the ground and altering the timing of water availability. Quantifying snow storage in forests has been an outstanding challenge in observations and model verification, with implications for management of forested watersheds. Recent progress has been demonstrated in quantifying rainfall interception with wind-induced tree sway data. Consistent with mechanical theory, the sway frequency of a tree drops as water mass is added to the canopy. However, the relevance of this approach to snowfall interception has received less attention.

In this CPP talk, I will highlight my ongoing experimental work using tree sway data to quantify snowfall interception in coniferous forests. Tree sway can be quantified using low-cost accelerometers. From these acceleration data, tree sway time series are derived from a windowed frequency analysis using Lomb-Scargle periodograms. I will first demonstrate the concept at the Niwot Ridge subalpine forest where I have been monitoring tree sway and snow interception since 2014. I will then compare results from Niwot to other locations in Colorado, including trees that I instrumented as part of the 2016-2017 NASA SnowEx campaign. Finally, I will discuss ideas and pathways for scaling up the methodology to quantify canopy snow storage at the forest stand scale.

TO JOIN BY ZOOM:
From a computer: https://cuboulder.zoom.us/j/5409618610   
Or iPhone one-tap :
    US: +16465588656,,5409618610#  
Or Telephone:
    Dial(for higher quality, dial a number based on your current location): 
        US: +1 646 558 8656  
    Meeting ID: 540 961 8610

date

Wednesday, January 23, 2019
11:00am to 12:00pm
MST

location

NSIDC, RL-2, Room 155/153

Event Type

NSIDC

contact

Mistia Zuckerman

2019-01-23
 
 
 
 
27
28
29
30
31
1
2
 
Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Global Observations of Ammonium Balance and pH Indicate More Liquid Aerosol and Acidic Conditions than Current Models Predict by Benjamin Nault, CU ANYL Chem Postdoc, Jimenez group

"The inorganic composition of aerosol impacts numerous chemical and physical processes and properties. However, many chemical transport models show large variability in both the concentration of the inorganic aerosols and their precursors (up to 3 orders of magnitude differences) and the composition of the inorganic aerosols. Different models would predict very different properties such as aerosol liquid water concentration, aerosol acidity (but most models do not calculate this property), heterogeneous uptake of gases, aerosols direct and indirect impact on climate, et cetera. Here, I use airborne observations from campaigns conducted around the world to investigate how the inorganic composition, and one of its key parameters, aerosol acidity, changes from the polluted regions (Mexico City, Los Angeles, Northeastern US, and Seoul) to the most remote regions (the Atmospheric Tomography campaigns 1 and 2), to provide constraints for the chemical transport models. I find that the empirical ammonium balance (ammonium balance = mol NH4 / (2×mol SO4 + mol NO3)) rapidly decreases from 0.85 in polluted regions to less than 0.2 in remote regions, contradictory to some modeling studies that suggest most of the has a balance near 1. The data imply very low NH3 in the upper troposphere, contrary to predicts of some models. Real-world aerosols are less likely to be in the solid phase and more likely to be in a metastable liquid state. Next, I explore the aerosol acidity with the E- AIM model, constrained by observations, and find that the acidity increases from the most polluted (median = 2.3) to most remote regions (median = –0.5). The chemical transport models have difficulty reproducing the aerosol acidity, showing both over and underestimation in pH. Several causes likely lead to these measurement vs model differences in aerosol acidity, including the mixing state of sea salt (internal vs. external) and total amount of NH x present in the atmosphere (NH x = NH3 (g) + NH4 + (p)), which are currently being investigated and will be briefly discussed during this talk."

and

Towards an improved representation of organic aerosol (OA) in the remote troposphere: Overall abundance, sources and physical and chemical removal by Pedro Campuzano Jost, CU ANYL Chem Research Scientist, Jimenez group

"Organic aerosol (OA) is one of the major contributors to the PM2.5 burden in the continental Northern Hemisphere (NH); understanding its sources and aging is central to current air quality control strategies. For the remote troposphere, sparse in-situ data to date results in highly under constrained OA prediction models, with model diversity of up to three orders of magnitude. As part of the recently concluded NASA Atmospheric Tomography (ATom) aircraft mission, we have acquired four unique global datasets of submicron aerosol concentration and composition over the remote Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Overall, OA concentrations except for the cleanest regions were comparable to sulfate, as in the Northern Hemisphere, with OA, sulfate and seasalt being the main contributors to both CCN and submicron AOD. An evaluation of state-of-the-art models (CESM, GEOS-Chem) with ATom meteorology fields shows that while overall models reproduce remote OA concentrations fairly well, they mostly fail to reproduce the large ratio of secondary to primary observed in the measurements and use unrealistic OA/OC ratios for tracking OA. Improved model parameterizations that account for these factors overestimate OA in most remote regions, suggesting that an additional, slow loss channel for OA is needed. Based on a photochemical clock analysis of the Atom data, we find an OA lifetime of about 10 days for this process, consistent with recent estimations of the OA removal rate due to OH oxidation and photolysis."

date

Monday, January 28, 2019
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

Ekeley S274

contact

Anne.Handschy@Colorado.EDU
2019-01-28
 
 
ESOC Weekly Coffee - Guest Speaker

ESOC Weekly Coffee - Guest Speaker

Guest speaker: Ian Willis (CIRES Visiting Fellow)- "Water on ice at all three poles: tracking surface lakes in Greenland, Antarctica and the Himalaya”

date

Wednesday, January 30, 2019
9:00am to 10:00am

location

ESOC Reading Room (2nd floor Ekeley)

contact

Ashley.Olson@colorado.edu
2019-01-30
 
Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Fires and Their Impacts: From Household Burning to Wildfires by Dr. Christine Wiedinmyer, Associate Director for Science at CIRES

Fires, including wildfires, prescribed burns, agricultural burning, or residential biomass burning, emit substantial amounts of particles, reactive trace gases, and longer lived species to the atmosphere on regional and global scales. These emissions and the products from downwind chemical processing degrade air quality, impact regional climate, and contribute to negative human health outcomes. There are many existing efforts to quantify emissions from biomass burning. These take advantage of laboratory and field measurements, remote sensing observations, and various modeling tools. Despite great advances in the ability to identify and quantify emissions from biomass burning, the techniques used to predict emissions and understand their fate and transport in the atmosphere remain uncertain, and the subsequent estimates of the impacts are difficult to assess. This presentation will detail efforts to identify and quantify biomass burning emissions across scales, and highlight their importance and confounding factors in air quality, health, and climate impact assessments. I will give an overview of my past and current biomass burning research, highlighting key uncertainties in our ability to predict biomass burning emissions and their impact and addressing needs for the future.

To join by ZOOM: 
From a computer: https://cuboulder.zoom.us/j/5409618610 
Or iPhone one-tap :US: +16465588656,,5409618610#
Or Telephone, Dial(for higher quality, dial a number based on your current location):
US: 1-646-558-8656 
Meeting ID: 540 961 8610
International numbers available: https://cuboulder.zoom.us/zoomconference?m=n9ouFAK_Rco_IPQABq0Xs3hCfONRRvVt
 

date

Wednesday, January 30, 2019
11:00am
MST

location

Room 155/Research Lab 2

Event Type

NSIDC

resources

contact

Mistia Zuckerman

2019-01-30