Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado Boulder



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Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

The Synthesis and Reactions of 3-Hydroxymethylphthalimides by Olivia Jenks, CU ANYL Chem 1st Year, de Gouw group

"Phthalimides possess a wide range of physiological properties, including anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities, and have been found to be useful in the preparation of specialized polymers and macrocycles. While a vast number of N-substituted phthalimides have been reported, the number of phenyl-substituted compounds is fairly limited. We have recently developed a convenient method for the synthesis of 3-hydroxymethylphthalimides, which have the potential for conversion into a number of other phenyl-substituted compounds. In this presentation, the transformation of the hydroxymethyl group to the corresponding chloride and the reactions of the benzylic halides with a variety of amines as nucleophiles will be described. With alkyl amines, nucleophilic acyl substitution at the imide ring competes with the desired alkyl substitution to yield diamides. Studies with substituted anilines show the rate of substitution varies markedly with the basicity of the nucleophile."

and

Fundamental investigation of substituent effects on threshold energy and electron density for the [1,3] thioallylic rearrangment by Mindy Schueneman, CU ANYL Chem 1st Year, Jimenez group

"Computational chemistry provides information of reaction energetics, thermodynamics, and kinetics by integrating computer modelling and and chemical theory. Computational chemistry was used to examine the effect of electron withdrawing and donating groups on both the threshold energy and electron density for the [1,3] thioallylic rearrangement mechanism. Thioallyl compounds contain a 3 carbon allyl chain with a sulfur in the C1 position. Through the combination of DFT and QTAIM, two computational methods, it was found that the thioallylic mechanism undergoes a concerted transition state, with most of the electron density contained on the sulfur atom. In addition, the activation energy barrier was found to decrease with the addition of electron donating groups located at various parts on the allyl backbone."

date

Monday, February 4, 2019
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

Ekeley S274

contact

Anne.Handschy@Colorado.EDU
2019-02-04
 
The Human Element Film Screening with James Balog

The Human Element Film Screening with James Balog

Inside the Greenhouse will be hosting James Balog and a screening of his new film

THE HUMAN ELEMENT
AN EARTH VISION FILM PRODUCTION

We humans are a force of nature. At the same time human activities alter the basic elements of life – earth, air, water, and fire – those elements change human life.

For almost 40 years, photographer James Balog has broken new conceptual and artistic ground on one of the most important issues of our era: human modification of nature. An avid mountaineer with a graduate degree in geography and geomorphology, James is equally at home on a Himalayan peak or a whitewater river, the African savannah or polar icecaps. His new film, THE HUMAN ELEMENT, is an innovative and visually stunning look at how humanity interacts with earth, air, fire and water. 

Inside the Greenhouse works to deepen our understanding of how issues associated with climate change are/can be communicated, by creating artifacts through interactive theatre, film, fine art, performance art, television programming, and appraising as well as extracting effective methods for multimodal climate communication.

date

Tuesday, February 5, 2019
9:30am

location

Old Main Chapel

Event Type

CSTPR
2019-02-05
 
Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Human Health and Potential Mercury Releases from Thawing Permafrost by Dr. Kevin Schaefer, Lead Research Scientist at NSIDC

ABSTRACT:  Permafrost regions have the largest stores of mercury (Hg) on the planet, with an estimated 1656±962 Gg Hg in the top three meters of soil, half of which occurs in permafrost bound to frozen plant organic matter.  If permafrost thaws, microbial decay of the organic matter will release Hg back into the environment.  We use a model to estimate the potential release of Hg from northern hemisphere permafrost for different scenarios of future warming.  We compare simulated Hg concentrations in the Yukon River to maximum allowed limits from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).  We estimate Hg concentrations in fish in the Yukon River and compare them to maximum safe levels from the EPA and World Health Organization.  The results indicate high risks to human health and food supply in the Arctic in the 21st century.

TO JOIN BY ZOOM:
From a computer: https://cuboulder.zoom.us/j/5409618610  
Or iPhone one-tap :
    US: +16465588656,,5409618610#  
Or Telephone:
    Dial(for higher quality, dial a number based on your current location): 
        US: +1 646 558 8656  
    Meeting ID: 540 961 8610

date

Wednesday, February 6, 2019
11:00am to 12:00pm
MST

location

NSIDC, RL-2, Room 155/153

Event Type

NSIDC

contact

Mistia Zuckerman

2019-02-06
 
CSTPR Noontime Seminar

CSTPR Noontime Seminar

The geopolitics of the energy transition
by Morgan Bazilian, Professor of Public Policy, Colorado School of Mines

This talk will be available via live webcast. To view the live webcast please go to Adobe Connect and login as a guest.

Abstract: 

The notion of an ‘energy transition’ remains an inchoate concept. Classically understood to encompass shifts in the national supply of energy or the discovery of new energy resources, energy transitions are now also conceptualized to include transformations in the markets that deliver energy, in addition to conversions in end‐use devices. In its recent formulation, it refers to a confluence of issues from rapid cost declines in renewable energy systems like wind and solar, to the US shale ‘revolution’, to IT advances in smart grids, to innovative new business and contract models.

While the climate change impacts of the transition are being well‐monitored, less so are the other energy‐related considerations. The lecture will outline some of the contours, inter alia; each complex on their own: 

  1. Institutional shifts in the influence and membership of multilateral organizations like the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and the International Energy Agency (IEA).
  2. The accelerating growth of trade in natural gas either through new international pipelines or via a rapidly expanding market for liquefied natural gas (LNG).
  3. The supply chain of cutting‐edge clean edge technologies and their trade.
  4. Issues of cybersecurity that are growing in importance with the rise of interconnected systems and new forms of metering and system operations.
  5. The changing landscape for conflict and other minerals due to these changes in technologies and their deployment in large numbers.
  6. The growing regional interconnection in electricity grids from the silk road to East Africa.
  7. The enormous issue plaguing developing countries: lingering energy poverty and the demand for provision of quality and affordable energy services to billions of people and businesses. It is clear that these areas go well beyond technology.

Morgan D. Bazilian is Executive Director of the Payne Institute and Professor of Public Policy at the Colorado School of Mines. Previously, he was Lead Energy Specialist at the World Bank. He has over two decades of experience in energy, natural resources, and environmental policy and international affairs. He holds a Ph.D. in energy analysis and was a Fulbright Fellow. He is a Member of the Council on Foreign Relations. He has published over 110 papers in learned journals, and his 2008 book: “Analytical Methods for Energy Diversity and Security” is a seminal work in the field. His work has appeared in Nature, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and Foreign Affairs. Dr. Bazilian is a member of the World Economic Forum’s Global Advisory Council on Energy, and served as an advisor to the International Energy's World Energy Outlook, and Bloomberg New Energy Finance's Global Energy Outlook. Dr. Bazilian was the European Union’s lead negotiator on technology issues at the UN’s climate change negotiations, and a member of the UN Expert Group on Technology. He was the first Chair of the Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Partnership Programme Board, and a founder of the UNEP Public Finance Alliance steering group. He was a contributing author to the IPCC and the Global Energy Assessment, and served as an advisor to a €200M cleantech venture capital fund. 

date

Wednesday, February 6, 2019
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

CSTPR Conference Room

Event Type

CSTPR

resources

2019-02-06
 
ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC Weekly Coffee

date

Wednesday, February 6, 2019
9:00am to 10:00am

location

ESOC Reading Room (2nd floor Ekeley)

contact

Ashley.Olson@colorado.edu
2019-02-06
 
 
 
 
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IRP Proposals Accepted February 11 - March 25

IRP Proposals Accepted February 11 - March 25

The CIRES Innovative Research Program will begin accepting applications February 11; all materials are due March 25 through this InsideCIRES link.

The IRP is designed to stimulate a creative research environment within CIRES and to encourage synergy between disciplines and research colleagues. The intent is to support small research efforts that can quickly provide concept viability or rule out further consideration. The program encourages novel, unconventional or fundamental research that might otherwise be difficult to fund. Funded projects are inventive, sometimes opportunistic, and do not necessarily have an immediate practical application or guarantee of success. This program supports pilot or exploratory studies, which may provide rapid results. Activities are not tightly restricted and can range from instrument development, lab testing, and field observations to model development, evaluation, and application.

date

Monday, February 11, 2019 to Monday, March 25, 2019
(All day)

resources

contact

Christine.Wiedinmyer@colorado.edu

»
Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Grills and grilles: cooking and traffic as drivers of spatial variations in exposure to particulate matter by Prof. Albert Presto, Carnegie Mellon

"Sharp spatial gradients of particulate matter (PM), organic aerosol (OA), and black carbon (BC) concentrations exist at intra-city scales (<1 km) due to intense emissions from sources like traffic and cooking activities. Typical stationary deployment of samplers is not capable of resolving these spatial gradients. By deploying an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) and other high temporal resolution measurements on a mobile sampling platform, we are able to investigate the spatial variation of PM mass concentration, PM composition, and particle number concentrations within cities. Source apportionment with Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) enables identification of contributions of traffic and other sources to the observed PM mass. Cooking and traffic sources dominate PM spatial variability.

This presentation will show results for two cities: Pittsburgh and Oakland. In locations with high local source impact in Pittsburgh, the PM1 concentration is 2 mg m-3 (40%) higher than urban background locations. Traffic emissions are the largest source contributing to population-weighted exposures to primary PM. The concentration of both cooking and traffic PM are positively correlated to their respective geographical covariates: vehicle-miles travelled (VMT) and restaurant count. VMT is a reliable predictor for traffic PM concentrations for use in air pollutant spatial models. Restaurant count is an imperfect predictor for cooking PM concentration, likely due to the highly variable emissions of individual restaurants. Cooking PM is also positively correlated to VMT, which suggests that near-road cooking emissions can be misattributed to traffic sources in the absence of PM source apportionment. In Pittsburgh, 27.7% and 8.9% of the total population are exposed to >1 mg m-3 of traffic- and cooking-related primary emissions, with some populations exposed to high concentrations from both sources. Results for Oakland show similar spatial patterns and concentration trends. While these data were collected for two cities, the source mix in many U.S. cities is similar. We therefore expect similar PM spatial patterns and increased exposures in high-source areas nationwide."

date

Monday, February 11, 2019
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

Ekeley S274

contact

Anne.Handschy@Colorado.EDU
2019-02-11
 
CMC February Meeting

CMC February Meeting

Attendance 

  • Mistia Zuckerman, CMC chair (NSIDC)
  • Alessandro Franchin, CMC co-chair (CSD) 
  • Jonathan Kofler, CMC Secretary (GMD)
  • Eric James (GSD)
  • Antonietta Capotondi (PSD)
  • Eric Adamson (SWPC)
  • Andrew Badger (Main Campus)
  • Carrie Bell (NCEI) 
  • Nathan Campbell (CIRES Admin)
  • Gaby Petron (GMD)
  • Aaron Sweeney (NCEI, non member)
  • Joseph Katich (CSD)
  • Michael Toy (GSD)
  • Dawn Umpleby (Earth Lab /NC CASC)
  • Adam Woods (NCEI)
  • Molly Hardeman (visitor)

2/11/2019:  Location: The Taj Restaurant, Basemar Shopping Center, Boulder

Meeting called to order at 12:38 pm

CU Family Housing Update

Alessandro (Ale) Franchin is in process of obtaining more information about CU Family Housing.  The Postdoctoral Association of Colorado (PAC) is also considering doing something regarding the housing limited term situation.  Ale would like to invite PAC to a CMC meeting so that we can coordinate since we have a lot of overlap and common interests.  Some discussion ensues with some points raised.  An undergrad student climate survey came out and found that housing was a big issue.  The university has a priority structure for determining who receives student housing. Gaby Petron points out limited housing resources is at the root of the problem. What is the solution?  Dawn Umpleby points out that there may be certain requirements that the university meet for the state.  Housing is a political battle because it is partially provided by money that comes from the state.  Eric Adamson is in faculty/family/student housing.  There was a questionnaire that came out in the previous couple years requesting feedback on various means of addressing housing issues including possibility of faculty/staff owned housing on university owned land with shared appreciation in the future south CU expansion.  Eric also attended a focus group run by outside advising firms for CU last week. The focus group was comprised of 6 faculty/staff and 3 students. Emotionally charged focus group, particularly on the part of faculty/staff. People for whom housing was a lifesaver, were very upset/scared after being notified of the recent change in housing policy.  Someone points out that Faculty should care about housing for Post-docs for the health of the university.

Ale reads his statement which is intended for Waleed and on a shared document.  Jon Kofler suggests adding a clear request to the end of the statement.  Ale’s wish is for Waleed to bring the statement to Chancellor and ask him to review the policy.

Motion: Mistia bring Ale’s statement to Christine, and then have her bring it to Waleed.  Unanimously approved.

Post-docs faculty should care about this for the health of the university.

“Graduate and family housing”

CIRES Bikes

Mistia would like to donate a bike from NSIDC to CIRES outreach to give to CIRES fellow. She would keep one at NSIDC and have another for a visitor.  Lucia can store it at the NOAA building.  Bicycles that reside on campus and stay in one location for more than a day are frequently vandalized, stolen or stripped of parts.  One bike on main campus was stolen twice. 

Travel Policy

Ale: There are lots of complaints, and should we do something about it.  Discussion ensues. There are some grey areas, are weekend days counted in the number of personal days?.  Do travel days count as work days?  Has the policy changed the policy that you allows you to pay the airfare difference?  Is there an appeal process if you are denied a travel request?.  Dawn Umpleby asks how does it compare to universities policy?  Action item:Mistia and Antonietta are going to develop a list questions about the new travel policy.

Donating Leave time

Joe Katich - Is there such a thing as auto enroll if you are up against use it or lose it annual leave to be able to donate it to those who need it.  After some discussion, conclude we should bring this up to BJ Thompson is able to make a CMC meeting and discuss what policies and mechanisms are in place and see if there are things that can or should be changed.

Salaries

Ale received an email from John Rush with the salary ranges for RS1. The salary range spans below $50k to greater than $100k with the median at $70k.  Ale raises the point of transparency and someone points out that when salaries are published and there is more transparency, less inequity occurs. Dawn Umpelby points out part of the discrepancy could be because some people are migrated to RS1 from the RA track, and that the funding source could play a role too.

Focus Groups  

No news, awaiting a future CMC meeting where Susan Sullivan can attend. Action item: Mistia will invite Susan to the next CMC meeting.

2019 Outstanding Performance Awards (OPA) (OPA Chair)

The committee is fully together including non-CMC representatives. Nate added some successful submission information/guidelines and examples to the online submission forms.

2019 Rendezvous Nate Campbell (Chair)

The Rendezvous is May 17.  Dawn Umpleby is the co-chair this year.  Going over the room limit is a concern this year, and it should be insured that CIRES employees get first priority to attend the event.   It is also possible that all the posters cannot be accommodated due to limited space; last year we came within one poster of the limit. After discussion it is concluded for the time being that first come/ first served for poster submissions should be implemented with a number of submissions available listed on the submission website.  However 97% of abstracts come in the night of the deadline which could make this tricky. Dawn has created a google drive document for sign up to volunteer positions.  Each CMC member should sign up for 2 slots.  Vegan food options was suggested and action item: Nate said he would look into vegan food options for the Rendezvous.

Onboarding(Mistia)

BJ Thompson is hiring a person to help him with on-boarding and he wants the CMC to wait until she is onboard to join a CMC meeting for a discussion of this topic. Ale brings up the need to get in touch with new hires as the CMC, and say something that everyone agrees with that explains our role (make a statement for new hires).

Government shutdown(Mistia)

A short discussion about what if anything should be done about the possible upcoming shutdown, during which someone notices Waleed has sent out an email, which ends the conversation.

Membership

Mistia - we ran out of time to discuss CMC membership.

Meeting is adjourned 1:54 pm.

date

Monday, February 11, 2019
12:30pm
2019-02-11
 
 
Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Firn Aquifers: Water-laden snow on the polar ice sheets by Dr. Ted Scambos, Senior Research Scientist at ESOC and Dr. Julie Miller, Research Scientist

Abstract: Satellite algorithms using passive and active microwave data have been used to detect and map firn aquifers — water-satured layers within the porous upper layers of a glacier. The long-term freeze-thaw condition of the deep firn is determined from the evolution of the residual melt signal in the microwave data in the autumn, winter, and spring months. The algorithm performed well at tracking the full extent of aquifers around the Greenland coastline, where they had been partially constrained by airborne radar data (specifically, the reflection from the upper surface of retained liquid meltwater) after being discovered in 2011. Applying the algorithm to the Antarctic continent, several areas were identified with signals indicative of seasonal or multi-annual aquifers. 

A team of NSIDC and CIRES scientists visited two of the sites in December of 2018. Using a hot-ring coring system, the team drilled into the upper firn on the Wilkins Ice Shelf and encountered a well-developed aquifer at 12 meters depth. The aquifer extended over the entire area surveyed, and likely covers the entire Wilkins Shelf based on airborne data from prior years and anecdotal observations of water-logged firn cores.  A second site on the George VI Ice Shelf, with less robust indications of a multi-annual aquifer, showed multiple thick (20 cm) ice layers but no liquid water. 

The presence of an aquifer on Wilkins Ice Shelf, which has experienced several ice shelf disintegration episodes similar to those of the Larsen B ice shelf, suggests that aquifers can support hydrofracture-driven enhanced fracturing. Thus areas of other ice shelves on the Antarctic coast where conditions in the future approach those present on the Wilkins Ice Shelf now would be susceptible to rapid ice shelf retreat, and subsequent faster flow from feeder glaciers.

TO JOIN BY ZOOM:
From a computer: https://cuboulder.zoom.us/j/5409618610   
Or iPhone one-tap :
    US: +16465588656,,5409618610#  
Or Telephone:
    Dial(for higher quality, dial a number based on your current location): 
        US: +1 646 558 8656  
    Meeting ID: 540 961 8610

date

Wednesday, February 13, 2019
11:00am to 12:00pm
MST

location

NSIDC, RL-2, Room 155/153

Event Type

NSIDC

contact

Mistia Zuckerman

2019-02-13
 
ESOC Weekly Coffee - Guest Speaker

ESOC Weekly Coffee - Guest Speaker

Guest speaker: Irina Overeem

“Sedimentation Dynamics and Subsidence in the Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta System”

date

Wednesday, February 13, 2019
9:00am to 10:00am

location

Ekeley S274

contact

Ashley.Olson@colorado.edu
2019-02-13
 
 
 
 
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IRP Proposals Accepted February 11 - March 25

IRP Proposals Accepted February 11 - March 25

The CIRES Innovative Research Program will begin accepting applications February 11; all materials are due March 25 through this InsideCIRES link.

The IRP is designed to stimulate a creative research environment within CIRES and to encourage synergy between disciplines and research colleagues. The intent is to support small research efforts that can quickly provide concept viability or rule out further consideration. The program encourages novel, unconventional or fundamental research that might otherwise be difficult to fund. Funded projects are inventive, sometimes opportunistic, and do not necessarily have an immediate practical application or guarantee of success. This program supports pilot or exploratory studies, which may provide rapid results. Activities are not tightly restricted and can range from instrument development, lab testing, and field observations to model development, evaluation, and application.

date

Monday, February 11, 2019 to Monday, March 25, 2019
(All day)

resources

contact

Christine.Wiedinmyer@colorado.edu

»
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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IRP Proposals Accepted February 11 - March 25

IRP Proposals Accepted February 11 - March 25

The CIRES Innovative Research Program will begin accepting applications February 11; all materials are due March 25 through this InsideCIRES link.

The IRP is designed to stimulate a creative research environment within CIRES and to encourage synergy between disciplines and research colleagues. The intent is to support small research efforts that can quickly provide concept viability or rule out further consideration. The program encourages novel, unconventional or fundamental research that might otherwise be difficult to fund. Funded projects are inventive, sometimes opportunistic, and do not necessarily have an immediate practical application or guarantee of success. This program supports pilot or exploratory studies, which may provide rapid results. Activities are not tightly restricted and can range from instrument development, lab testing, and field observations to model development, evaluation, and application.

date

Monday, February 11, 2019 to Monday, March 25, 2019
(All day)

resources

contact

Christine.Wiedinmyer@colorado.edu

»
 
 
 
Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Chemistry on Ice: Shedding Light on Arctic Halogen Photochemistry by Prof. Kerri Pratt, University of Michigan

"With rapid sea ice loss and warming, there is an urgent need to understand the unique chemistry involving multiphase reactions of atmospheric aerosols and the snow-covered sea ice surface in the Arctic. Yet, the harsh environment and low analyte concentrations pose analytical challenges. The Pratt Lab utilizes novel mass spectrometry techniques to measure the complex chemistry of trace gases, aerosols, and snow in the Arctic. Using chemical ionization mass spectrometry, we are advancing understanding of Arctic halogen photochemistry through measurements of trace gas species at ppq to ppt levels, including observations of trace gases species for the first time in the ambient atmosphere. Bromine, chlorine, and iodine chemistry, and the coupling of the cycles involving these halogen species, have significant impacts on the fate of greenhouse gases and pollutants, including ozone, methane, and mercury. Sunlit and artificial light experiments conducted in the Alaskan Arctic, combined with atmospheric measurements and numerical modeling, were utilized to elucidate chemical mechanisms driving the unique multiphase processes. The new chemical insights obtained are providing crucial scientific detail needed to understand and predict changing atmospheric composition in the Arctic."

date

Monday, February 25, 2019
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

Ekeley S274

contact

Anne.Handschy@Colorado.EDU
2019-02-25
 
 
Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

An underestimated and vulnerable carbon stock: floodplain soil carbon storage in permafrost regions and the potential for future changes due to warming by Dr. Katherine B. Lininger, Assistant Professor, Department of Geography,  at CU Boulder

Abstract:  Rivers influence the global carbon cycle by delivering carbon to the oceans, providing sites for carbon processing, and storing carbon in floodplains for decades to millennia. However, the amount of organic carbon (OC) stored in river corridors (channels and floodplains) and the geomorphic influences on the spatial distribution of OC are not well understood. High latitude regions are experiencing rapid warming and permafrost thaw, and these regions contain large amounts of OC in the subsurface. Very little work has quantified OC storage in floodplains in the high latitudes. I present data on floodplain OC stocks in soil in the Yukon Flats in interior Alaska, a region with discontinuous permafrost. Fieldwork that recognizes floodplains as distinct environments relative to uplands can result in more accurate estimates of soil OC stocks in permafrost regions. I also present conceptual models that can be used to guide research on floodplains in permafrost regions as climate changes. Because of climate warming and permafrost thaw, geomorphic and biogeochemical processes may be significantly altered in high latitudes boreal regions. I draw on previously published literature to describe potential changes in geomorphic processes and the influence these changes may have on floodplain OC stocks. Determining floodplain OC stocks and the geomorphic influences on those stocks is important for accounting for carbon within the Earth system and for understanding and assessing future changes caused by warming. 

TO JOIN BY ZOOM:
From a computer: https://cuboulder.zoom.us/j/5409618610   
Or iPhone one-tap :
    US: +16465588656,,5409618610#  
Or Telephone:
    Dial(for higher quality, dial a number based on your current location): 
        US: +1 646 558 8656  
    Meeting ID: 540 961 8610

date

Wednesday, February 27, 2019
11:15am to 12:15pm
MST

location

NSIDC, RL-2, Room 155/153

Event Type

NSIDC

contact

Mistia Zuckerman

2019-02-27
 
Distinguished Lecture Series: Dr. Jean-Philippe Avouac

Distinguished Lecture Series: Dr. Jean-Philippe Avouac

Title: “Silent uplift, Monsoonal swing and millenary quakes in the Himalaya”

Abstract: Why is the Himalayan so high and so steep? For one, the crust is deforming and earthquakes are at play. The small earthquakes, which are intriguingly sensitive to the Monsoon, correlate with the high topography, but don’t seem to contribute much to mountain building. Sure enough, the Mw 7.8 Gorkha earthquake ruptured the main fault along which the Himalaya is thrust over India. Then how come the high Himalayan peaks went down during the Mw 7.8 Gorkha earthquake? And how come the earthquake didn’t rupture the mountain front where the fault reaches the surface? Why was the ground shaking so mildly in Kathmandu right above the rupture, leaving most of the town intact, while some taller buildings were severely damaged and even collapsed? This presentation will outline an integrated model that reconciles these intriguing observations with our knowledge of the structure and long-term evolution of the range, and draw the implications for seismic hazard. Millenary ~Mw9 earthquakes seem required to balance the strain budget in this framework.

Bio: Jean-Philippe Avouac is the Earle C. Anthony Professor of Geology and of Mechanical and Civil Engineering at the California Institute of Technology and the director of the IUCRC/NSF Center for Geomechanics and Mitigation of Geohazards. He worked as the BP-McKenzie Professor of Earth Sciences at the University of Cambridge , UK in 2014-2015. He was the director of the Caltech Tectonics Observatory from 2004 to 2014.

Jean-Philippe Avouac graduated from Ecole Polytechnique in 1987 and received his PhD in Geology from the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, France, in 1991.

Jean-Philippe Avouac has been studying earthquakes and tectonic processes for more than 25 years. He has contributed to method developments in remote sensing, geodesy, geomorphology and seismology. He uses these techniques to inform theory and develop numerical models of earthquakes, deformation of the crust and mountain building processes.

Jean-Philippe Avouac is currently Editor-in-chief of Earth and Planetary Science Letters, and he served as the Editor-in-chief of Tectonophysics from 2014 to 2018. He is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union and president elect of the Tectonophysics section. He has received international awards in particular from the Humboldt Foundation (Germany) and the Royal Society (UK).

Jean-Philippe Avouac has published more than 180 articles in international peer-reviewed journals and holds patents in image processing.

date

Thursday, February 28, 2019
4:00pm

location

CIRES Auditorium, Room 338

Event Type

DLS

resources

2019-02-28