Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado Boulder



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Cryospheric and Polar Processess Seminar

Cryospheric and Polar Processess Seminar

San Rafael Glacier in Patagonia, surface mass balance estimation of a complex glacier in a warm climate regime by Gabriela Collao-Barrios, Phd. Université Grenoble Alpes

San Rafael Glacier in the Northern Patagonia Icefield (NPI) have been losing mass at an accelerated rate during the last decades compared to the mean losses recorded since the Little Ice Age. Ice dynamics and ice discharge  have an important role on glacier mass budget due to the fast ice velocity of this glacier (>7 km a-1, within de faster glacier in the world). Here we use ice flow modelling to constraint the glacial mass budget components (mass balance, surface mass balance and ice discharge) and estimated the commited mass loss in the next century. This study is done using the full-Stokes model Elmer/Ice. Then, we model the surface mass balance and atmospheric conditions using the regional circulation model MAR (Modèle Atmosphérique Regional), and we relate glacier westage and climatic conditions.

date

Wednesday, April 3, 2019
11:00am to 12:00pm

location

NSIDC, RL2, Rm 155

contact

Mistia.Zuckerman@colorado.edu
2019-04-03
 
 
LOCC Film Screening

LOCC Film Screening

Platt Choice Middle School students will show their short films that they made addressing climate change in their communities during the Lens On Climate Change program (hosted by CIRES Education & Outreach). It will be in the CIRES Auditorium from noon to 1:30. It’s open to anyone who would like to come watch.

date

Friday, April 5, 2019
12:00pm to 1:30pm

location

CIRES Auditorium

contact

erin.leckey@colorado.edu
2019-04-05
 
 
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Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Deliquescence and Efflorescence of Chlorate Salts under Mars-relevant Conditions by Marium Fernanders,
3rd year ANYL student, Tolbert lab

"When searching for life elsewhere in the universe, scientists have mainly focused on finding liquid water. However, in addition to liquid water, the presence of certain types of salts could also be a marker for water and perhaps life. The presence of chlorate salts, on the surface or in the sub-surface, could be an indicator of where to find life and water on present day Mars. Recent research has found that certain types of terrestrial bacteria can survive in per/chlorate-rich salt environments by using these salts as an energy source. Because of the salts’ low eutectic temperatures and ability to deliquesce (liquefy), these salts may be able to provide the ideal conditions (liquid water and energy) where life may be found in either the surface or sub-surface.

In the search for life on other planetary bodies, one of the places where scientists are looking is our closest neighbor: Mars. Mars, like Earth, exists in the “Goldilocks” zone a set area around a star where planetary bodies are not too hot or too cold for liquid water to occur. However, liquid water has not yet been detected on present day Mars. Mars with a little help from salts, could support liquid water on the surface or in the sub-surface through the process of deliquescence, where a crystal salt absorbs water vapor from the atmosphere, like a sponge, and when the conditions are just right turn into a briny droplet of water. This research proposal will study the low temperature deliquescence and efflorescence (when a briny droplet loses water through evaporation and turns back into a salt crystal) of chlorate salts and chlorate salt mixtures under Mars-relevant pressures and temperatures. By doing this, I will improve our knowledge of how chlorate salts behave under conditions where liquid water may be formed on Mars. In order to determine the conditions under which chlorates will deliquesce and eventually effloresce I will use a Raman microscope attached to an environmental cell where the pressure, temperature, and humidity can be controlled to mimic Mars-like conditions. The Raman microscope will allow me to see a salt particle turn into a liquid and back into a crystal using visual and spectroscopic identification. The Raman uses a green laser to probe a specific salt crystal or briny droplet. The light from the laser gets scattered back into a detector and I can then use the light scattering to characterize and identify the physical state, and chemical composition of crystal or droplet. The information will allow me to determine the deliquescence relative humidity (DRH), and the efflorescence relative humidity (ERH) of the chlorate salts and salt mixtures. By determining these fundamental properties as a function of temperature and pressure, we can then use NASA’s Mars rover and satellite data to determine if there are conditions on Mars where aqueous salt solutions can exist, and possibly flow, on the surface or sub-surface."

date

Monday, April 8, 2019
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

Ekeley S274

contact

Anne.Handschy@Colorado.EDU
2019-04-08
 
CIRES Members Council Meeting April

CIRES Members Council Meeting April

Attendance

  • Mistia Zuckerman, CMC chair (NSIDC)
  • Jonathan Kofler, CMC Secretary (GMD)
  • Eric James (GSD)
  • Antonietta Capotondi (PSD)
  • Andrew Badger (Main Campus)
  • Carrie Bell (NCEI)
  • Nathan Campbell (CIRES Admin)
  • Mimi Hughes (PSD)
  • Gaby Petron (GMD)
  • Joseph Katich (CSD)
  • Michael Toy (GSD)
  • Molly Hardeman (NSIDC-new member)
  • Eric Adamson (SWPC)

4/9/2019:  Location: NOAA-DSRC 3C405.

Meeting called to order at 12:36 pm

Rendezvous

Dawn Umplebly:  Posters are due by Friday.  There has been good participation on sign up sheet for volunteers, but we still need 2-3 more for tear down, registration table 1 more, setting up easels 1 more person, a few more to hand out name tags.  Then, some discussion ensues about the acknowledgements of years of service and other awards being available for pick up at the registration desk.  Lucia points out that people don’t pick them up at the start, because they don’t want to carry them around with them during the Rendezvous.  Also, there are scenarios that have happened where people don’t get their awards at the Rendezvous because they have retired.  She suggests that the best solution may be to send the awards out in the interoffice mail prior to the Rendezvous.  Action item (Dawn): look into mailing out Rendezvous awards. Mistia motion: should we send out awards before Rendezvous?  Unanimous yes.

Outstanding Performance Awards 

OPA Chair:  The committee met on 14 April, and sent recommendations to Waleed.  He approved them on the 24th with no appeals.  The OPA committee was all men and there is some discussion about whether some level of diversity on the committee should be required.  The committee is only 6 people, so it’s possible that this year was just a statistical anomaly.  There tends to be a shortage of volunteers and emails go out to everyone in all clusters.  This year several emails had to go out before enough recruits were found, so it is not possible to be selective for diversity if we don’t have a surplus of volunteers.  How do you insure that recruitment is balanced?  Dawn says maybe Susan should be a permanent part of the OPA committee.

Questions for Susan Sullivan at next meeting:

  • Have her on the OPA committee? Or ask her about how to insure OPA committee diversity.
  • Graduate and early career housing 
  • Discuss ways to insure diversity of CMC members
  • Lucia: foreign nationals access 
  • CMC diversity, should it be part of the by-laws.

Foreign nationals building access

Lucia: Some foreign nationals were not being escorted in the DSRC.  They are escorted so that they cannot steal or damage federal equipment or information.  There has been a memo in place since 2006, and this memo is no longer considered adequate.  There has been a lack of guidance from the security office about guidelines and consistency.  For example, are foreign nationals to be walked to and from the bathroom, and should they be accompanied in conference rooms, etc.  Nothing has been formally communicated.  There is a meeting happening today with laboratory managers to discuss this issue.  Currently, its somewhat open.  Foreign nationals get escorted for the first few days, then they essentially have the same access as other CIRES employees.  Lucia thinks that may change.  It is possible there will be escort requirements.  SWPC and NCEI are managed separately, so they don't have the same restrictions.  Possibilities for access allowances might be to recognize everything as public space.  Unescorted federal access is not allowed according to the actual documentation.  Be aware of it.  Ultimately you have to refer to your federal manager.  Eric A.: Will this include cell phone usage too?  Lucia: the new requirements are about physical access.  There are more than 50 and less than 100 foreign nationals in DSRC.  Visitors are supposed to be escorted all the time.  Only feds can escort. 

Salary Equity

Mistia reports that Ale has been trying to get salary range information for different positions.  He went to BJ Thompson to get salary ranges and was astounded at the spread.  Eric A. referred to David Stone for salary within position.  It is well known that each division will have different salary ranges.  For example SWPC will have a different salary range than NCEI.  Dawn: a few post docs moved to RS1 positions.  All of the group leads have salary ranges in a spreadsheet.  When inequity is identified they are rehired at higher level.  It is up to the employee and group leads to identify.  CIRES human resources gives group leads a roster.  Gaby thinks that there should be oversight of the CIRES leads.  Lucia explains that Christine does this; specific issues can be brought to Christine.  Gaby feels that 2 people should be keeping an eye on this.

Lucia:  Supervisor training is on our wish list.  CU managers academy exists, but has lots of material that is not relevant for CIRES.  ASA trainings have been conducted in the past.  Lucia: people need to attend these things.  The information is there, but it is not ingested.  Jon - this could be part of onboarding. 

Lucia is the trainer for ASA and career track.  She is looking for suggestions on what training is needed and where the deficits are. 

Wish List for New Human Resource Hire

Mistia:  Make the onboarding process a priority for HR.  Hopes that the HR person will come and sit for one day a week at DSRC and other clusters.  Historically, some representatives have sat one day a week at the DSRC.  John Rush, etc, but BJ did not.  Rebecca sits in Earth Lab

Eric J.:  Maybe there should be a quick mandatory meeting at the 6 month point after on-boarding.  Sort of an onboarding part 2.  Dawn had no onboarding.  Lucia: On-boarding is not mandatory, but she gets near 100% response on initial onboarding.  For later trainings, people don’t show up.  Waleed stopped attending new hire meetings because they were poorly attended. Adamson: Supervising training is critical because many supervisors show no supervisory skills.  Lucia points out though that some supervisors don't work with their supervisee's but merely sign their timesheets.

- Lucia, 6-month meeting would be a good opportunity

Action item: Mistia will draft an email to send out to clusters, asking for feedback on what would have been useful to know during the first few months of starting.

BJ Thompson is managing HR now, and BJs replacement is being recruited right now.

Mentoring Program Update:

Mimi:. The mentoring committee met with the student Nate hired and is planning to continue to meet with him to iron out details of the website and program.  Currently they are doing mock ups of the website.  There was some discussion of how to include gender and other information in the meetings, but it was determined that those types of details cannot be asked for on the application website. 

CMC Membership

Mistia:  We are working on our membership form for CMC and turning it in to Eric J.  Aaron Sweeney taking over for Carrie Wall and today is his first day as a CMC representative.  Prior to coming to the meeting he was reading and preparing and did not find mention of a Charter for the CMC.  Mimi:  The mission statement is the charter.   Some question arises about representation numbers; Eric J. says that there is somewhere between 2 and 4 percent representation for each cluster.  However, the cluster populations change and it would be good to review the representation numbers.  Action item: Eric to send out spreadsheet with representation of different clusters on the CMC. 

Old CMC notes and google drive.

Mistia reports that Rob Shubert offered her some notes from old CMC meetings (hard copies).  Aaron Sweeney volunteers to go through google drive.  Lucia:  Would it make sense to hire a student to go through google drive?  We can have them sign non-disclosure agreements in case there is any sensitive material.  

Meeting adjourned 1:39pm.  

date

Tuesday, April 9, 2019

location

NOAA-DSRC 3C405

resources

Files

2019-04-09
 
 
 
 
 
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Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Dropping Acid in the Atmosphere: Is It Just a Phase? by Prof. Andrew Ault,
Univ. of Michigan

"Atmospheric aerosols are incredibly complex chemical systems with thousands of species present in yoctoliter to attoliter volumes, which makes measuring their chemical and physical properties an analytical challenge. Despite these instrumental demands, measuring aerosol properties is essential, as air pollution leads to 10% of global deaths annually, primarily due to the effects of atmospheric particles. These aerosols are also the most uncertain aspect of radiative balance leading to climate change. The Ault Laboratory is focused on understanding the complex heterogeneous and multiphase chemistry occurring within aerosols through systematic physical chemistry studies, the development of new analytical methods and sensors, and measurements of complex systems in that atmosphere. We conduct these studies this through a combination of spectroscopy, microscopy, and mass spectrometry techniques. This seminar will focus on the acidity, phase, and morphology of mixed organic-inorganic atmospheric particles. Specifically, we will focus on the acid-catalyzed ring opening reaction of isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX), formation of organosulfates and polyols, and subsequent changes to diffusion in viscous materials. From this we can predict future properties and amounts of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). With our novel analytical methodologies and physical chemistry studies, the Ault Laboratory is providing fundamental molecular insights into the chemistry occurring within atmospheric aerosols that have significant consequences for human health and global climate."

date

Monday, April 15, 2019
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

Ekeley S274

contact

Anne.Handschy@Colorado.EDU
2019-04-15
 
 
CSTPR Noontime Seminar

CSTPR Noontime Seminar

Institutions, infrastructures, and coastal hazard risk in Bangladesh ​
by Kimberly Rogers, Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, University of Colorado Boulder

PLEASE NOTE: This talk has been cancelled for April 17 and will be rescheduled for Fall 2019.

Abstract: Built infrastructure designed to enhance socioeconomic development within the constantly shifting landscapes of river deltas often transcends institutional boundaries. Static, state-governed infrastructure such as embankments and irrigation systems are difficult to maintain on physically dynamic delta surfaces; as a result, these systems can locally fail under stress from river migration and storm surges, resulting in the loss of arable land. Water management in river basins further impacts the sustainability of agriculture in deltas by reducing the delivery of freshwater and sediment to deltaic floodplains. Rural farming communities in deltas are dealing with the collective impact of upstream infrastructure that restricts downstream flows, and dysfunctional local-scale embankment governance. Vulnerability to this convergence is likely to increase with stochastic and gradual climate change. In this talk, I will describe how rural communities are interacting with a failing state-managed infrastructure system in a delta where physical and institutional processes intersect: the Ganges-Brahmaputra (Bengal) Delta in Bangladesh. A nested Institutional and Analysis and Development Framework (IADF) is used to (i) identify critical overlaps between multi-scalar physical processes, infrastructure, and institutions in the Bengal Delta and its river basins, and (ii) diagnose how failure of this coupled infrastructure system increases coastal hazard risk. The IADF guided focus group discussions with smallholder farmers in coastal Bangladesh, revealing that spatially variable physical processes heterogeneously impact infrastructure performance and thus, how local institutions collectively mitigate and manage the effects of failing infrastructure.

Kimberly Rogers is an INSTAAR Research Associate and environmental scientist specializing in coupled human-natural systems in coastal regions. She integrates quantitative and qualitative data collected using mixed methods, which help her to understand complexity arising from multi-scalar interactions between infrastructure, physical processes, and livelihood choices within the dynamic landscapes of river deltas. Kimberly has a PhD in Environmental Engineering from Vanderbilt University and a BSc in Geological Sciences from the University of Texas at Austin. She is a Research Affiliate of the Center for the Analysis of Socioecological Landscapes at Indiana University, and is a Visiting Scholar alumnus of the Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research-UFZ in Germany and the Ostrom Workshop in Political Theory and Policy Analysis at Indiana University. She has worked as an international science advisor to the World Bank and to USAID in Bangladesh. Dr. Rogers is an advocate for actionable and open science, as well as for integrating local-scale solutions into top-down policy related to sustainable coastal management.

date

Wednesday, April 17, 2019
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

CSTPR Conference Room

Event Type

CSTPR

resources

2019-04-17
 
 
 
 
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Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Methods for the quantification and identification of alkenes on indoor surfaces by Benjamin Deming,
ANYL 3rd year, Ziemann group

 

"Indoor surfaces can support organic films, which can act as sinks for semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs), reactors for condensed-phase reactions, sites of heterogeneous gas-condensed-phase reactions, and exposure routes for human health impacts. Although there have been some studies on indoor surface films, their size, composition, and chemistry are still uncertain. Additionally, the majority of studies investigating these films have been performed on impermeable surfaces, typically window glass. Painted surfaces, which tend to dominate by surface area, potentially differ from glass in several important ways, and are therefore an understudied aspect of indoor environments. Interior wall paint is normally composed of an organic binder and an inorganic filler, which may change the way films initially form as well as their subsequent growth. Film components may also absorb into paint and away from the surface, changing the composition of the film that remains. Oxidation indoors is largely driven by ozone and reactions with alkenes are therefore of particular interest. There are a number of sources unique to indoor environments which may contribute alkenes to surface films: cooking oils can have a high degree of unsaturation, many fragrances and cleaners contain terpene derivatives, and human beings constantly produce skin oil, which contains squalene and unsaturated fatty acids. To explore these areas of interest we characterized a method for quantitatively sampling the low-volatility, organic portion of a surface film using a surface wipe and developed a spectrophotometric method for quantifying nanomole quantities of alkenes. Samples were also derivatized, adding a readily ionizable group to non-conjugated double bonds, allowing for identification by positive-mode ESI-MS. Samples from neighboring glass and painted surfaces were collected from a variety of locations, including a classroom, graduate student offices, a bowling alley, a gym, and more. To investigate the effect of cooking on nearby surface concentrations we pan-fried three different cooking oils at high temperatures and analyzed the double bond content of the raw oil, cooked oil, and nearby surfaces. The effect of ongoing exposure to ozone on the alkene concentrations on the human envelope was explored by obtaining samples from the foreheads of volunteers at different times of the day. In a final experiment we studied the effect of using a terpene cleaner on measured surface concentrations. The results from this work should be useful to the modeling of indoor environments and help assess the importance of surfaces to indoor chemistry."

date

Monday, April 22, 2019
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

Ekeley S274

contact

Anne.Handschy@Colorado.EDU
2019-04-22
 
Hydrology & Water Resources Seminar

Hydrology & Water Resources Seminar

Iran’s Water Bankruptcy and Politics by Kaveh Madani, Henry Hart Rice Senior Fellow, The MacMillan Center, Department of Political Science, Yale University, Visiting Professor, Centre for Environmental Policy, Imperial College London

Abstract

In this seminar, Kaveh Madani, a former deputy head of Iran’s Department of Environment, overviews the major drivers of Iran’s water resource problems and shares his observations during his service as the Deputy Vice President of a country that is under strong international and domestic pressure. He argues that Iran is suffering from a socio-economic drought—i.e. “water bankruptcy,” where water demand exceeds the natural water supply significantly. Madani believes that the current structure of the water governance system and the food-dependence paranoia in Iran leaves minimal hope for a meaningful reform that can address Iran’s water problems in a timely manner. In this talk, he reviews how the internal politics forced him to eventually resign from his post after being labelled as a ‘water terrorist’ and getting accused of espionage for CIA, MI6 and Mossad.

Kaveh Madani is an environmental scientist, educator, and activist, working at the interface of science, policy, and society. He has previously served as the Deputy Vice President of Iran in his position as the Deputy Head of Iran’s Department of Environment, the Vice President of the UN Environment Assembly Bureau, and Chief of Iran’s Department of Environment’s International Affairs and Conventions Center. He is currently a Henry Hart Rice Senior Fellow at the MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies of Yale University and a Visiting Professor at the Centre for Environmental Policy (CEP) of Imperial College London. He has received a number of awards for his research, teaching, as well as outreach and humanitarian activities, including the New Faces of Civil Engineering recognition in 2012, the Arne Richter Award for Outstanding Young Scientists in 2016, and the Walter Huber Civil Engineering Research Prize in 2017. 

CIRES will provide a light reception after the seminar.

date

Tuesday, April 23, 2019
4:00pm to 5:00pm

location

CIRES Auditorium

Event Type

Seminar

Amenities

Refreshments provided

contact

ami.nacu-schmidt@colorado.edu
2019-04-23
 
 
Stand Up For Climate Change

Stand Up For Climate Change

An Event with Creative Climate Comedy

Thursday, April 25 at 7:00 pm
Old Main Auditorium
University of Colorado Boulder

View poster

Humor is a tool underutilized, and comedy has the power to effectively connect with people about climate change issues. Our event is associated with the Spring 2019 ‘Creative Climate Communications' course and the larger 'Inside the Greenhouse' project.

A night of comedy skits from CU Boulder students about climate change issues. The 2019 winners from the ITG Comedy & Climate Change Short Video Competition will also be announced and their video submissions will be shown at the event.

More info: http://www.insidethegreenhouse.org/events

date

Thursday, April 25, 2019
7:00pm

location

Old Main Chapel

Event Type

CSTPR
2019-04-25
 
Managing Infrastructure in the Stream Environment

Managing Infrastructure in the Stream Environment

Ms. Caroline Ubing

Bureau of Reclamation’s Sedimentation and River Hydraulics Group, Denver, CO

& Dr. Joel Sholtes

Colorado Mesa University, Grand Junction, CO (formerly at Bureau of Reclamation’s Sedimentation and River Hydraulics Group, Denver, CO

A technical guidance document has been developed to lay the foundation for infrastructure managers and designers to understand how to build, maintain, or decommission infrastructure in a manner that is both resilient to riverine hazards and aligned with stream ecosystem needs. This 60-minute webinar will highlight key points of this guidance document. Ms. Ubing and Dr. Sholtes will introduce fundamental geomorphic and ecological concepts and provide four stages of riverine planning and design discussion accompanied by real-world examples. The presentation will conclude by examining how infrastructure can be better managed under increasing hydrologic uncertainty and natural disaster frequency. 


PRESENTER BIOGRAPHIES

Ms. Caroline Ubing is a hydraulic engineer at the Bureau of Reclamation Sedimentation and River Hydraulics Group in Denver, Colorado. Much of her work focuses on 2D numerical analysis of river restoration and riverine infrastructure projects. Dr. Joel Sholtes is a hydraulic engineer and fluvial geomorphologist. He is an instructor of civil engineering at Colorado Mesa University in partnership with the University of Colorado, Boulder.  Prior to teaching, Joel worked with the Bureau of Reclamation Sedimentation and River Hydraulics Group. 

 

 

 

 

date

Thursday, April 25, 2019
11:00am
MDT

Event Type

Seminar

resources

contact

J. Toby Minear

2019-04-25
 
 
 
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How to Deal with Sediment in Dam Removal

How to Deal with Sediment in Dam Removal

Ms. Jennifer Bountry
Dr. Tim Randle
Bureau of Reclamation Sedimentation and River Hydraulics Group, Denver, CO

Technical guidelines for dam removal have been developed to link the level of reservoir sediment data collection, analysis, and modeling to the level of risk to river-related resources. In this 60-minute webinar, Ms. Bountry and Dr. Randle will present key components of the guidelines. The presentation will include the reservoir data gathering steps; significance of reservoir sediment volume; sediment and dam removal alternatives; sediment analyses and modeling; and uncertainty, monitoring, and adaptive management. Case study examples from small to large dam removals will also be included to demonstrate how the level of sediment investigation can vary, depending on the potential sediment risk to natural resources or infrastructure.


PRESENTER BIOGRAPHIES

Ms. Jennifer Bountry and Dr. Tim Randle are hydraulic engineers at the Bureau of Reclamation Sedimentation and River Hydraulics Group in Denver, Colorado. They have worked on multiple dam removal projects in the western United States, river restoration design and analysis, and reservoir sedimentation issues throughout the world. They have recently published on the Savage Rapids and Elwha Dam removal projects, and led the development of two guidelines on dam removal implementation and sedimentation analysis.

 

 

date

Monday, April 29, 2019
11:30am
MDT

location

Event Type

Seminar

resources

contact

J. Toby Minear

2019-04-29
 
Dr. William Lewis CU Distinguished Research Lecture

Dr. William Lewis CU Distinguished Research Lecture

William M. Lewis Jr., University of Colorado Boulder professor of ecology and evolutionary biology and director of the CIRES Center for Limnology, will deliver a Distinguished Research Lecture entitled “Lakes, Nutrients, and Water Sin” at 4 pm on Tuesday, April 30. The talk will be held in the Glenn Miller Ballroom at the University Memorial Center and a reception will follow.

Lewis’ talk will explore the nature of fertility and its consequences in aquatic ecosystems, which has long been the subject of intensive research, with two key motivations. 

First, the study of nutrients is basic to the understanding of natural ecosystem processes. Plant nutrients control production of plant biomass, which in turn energizes all other parts of the foodweb, including grazers, predators and microbes. 

Additionally, global degradation of aquatic ecosystems is occurring due to human mobilization of plant nutrients. Nutrient enrichment (eutrophication) causes large increases in the abundance of aquatic plants. Lakes are especially sensitive to enrichment, which causes algal populations to expand many times beyond their natural abundances.

Enrichment favors nuisance algal species that form scums, secrete toxins and cause deep waters of lakes to become anoxic dead zones. Much of the use and beauty of lakes is lost when lakes are fertilized by humans. Water quality protection in many nations, including the United States, emphasizes reduction of the vast human mobilization of both nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) that has enriched surface waters.

Lewis’ lecture will focus on the projected outcome of withdrawal from enrichment: Can anthropogenically-enriched aquatic ecosystems be restored to a natural state?

About Professor Lewis

Professor Lewis came to CU Boulder in 1974 following his doctoral work at Indiana University. In 1988 he became a Fellow of CIRES where he founded the Center for Limnology, the study of inland waters (lakes, streams, wetlands). The Center supports research and education on aquatic ecosystems with emphasis on Colorado waters. 

Lewis and Kristine M. Larson of the Ann and H.J. Smead Department of Aerospace Engineering Sciences were selected to receive the 2018 Distinguished Research Lectureship, which is among the most esteemed honors bestowed by the faculty upon a faculty member at CU Boulder.

Larson’s talk, which summarized “traditional” applications of GPS in geosciences as well as new environmental applications her group has developed, took place on Dec. 5.  

Lakes, Nutrients, and Water Sin

Lewis has had a strong interest in aquatic ecosystems of the tropics, which are attractive for research because they have been studied very little as compared with waters at higher latitudes. Lewis established field laboratories in the Philippines, the Mekong River in Laos, Lake Valencia in Venezuela, and the Orinoco River in Venezuela, with its associated lakes and wetlands. Lewis and his group have also continuously studied lakes, streams and rivers of Colorado.

Lewis was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship for research in phytoplankton dynamics. He also received the Sustained Achievement Award of the Renewable Natural Resources Foundation for work at the interface of ecosystem science and environmental policy. From the International Society for Limnology, he received the Naumann-Thienemann Medal for studies of tropical waters and the Baldi Lectureship for global studies of biotic production in lakes. He is a Fellow of AAAS and served as President of the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography.

 

RSVP HERE

date

Tuesday, April 30, 2019
4:00pm
2019-04-30