Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado Boulder



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RECCS Student Poster Session at UCAR

RECCS Student Poster Session at UCAR

Join the Research Experiences for Community College Students (RECCS) team as the student researchers present posters of their work at a jointly held poster session with other REU students. Includes a small reception.

 

The Research Experience for Community College Students (RECCS) is a summer research internship program for Colorado community college students. The goal of RECCS is to give community college students an authentic research experience that allows them to explore environmental or geosciences and gain the confidence to transition to a four-year program in the STEM (Science Technology Engineering Math) disciplines.

 

For additional info about location, click here.

date

Thursday, August 1, 2019
4:00pm to 5:30pm

location

UCAR Center Green 1 (3080 Center Green Dr, Boulder, CO)

Amenities

Refreshments provided

contact

Renee.Curry@colorado.edu
2019-08-01
 
RECCS Student Researcher Presentations

RECCS Student Researcher Presentations

Come join the Research Experience for Community College Students (RECCS) team as they celebrate a summer of sucessful science!

RECCS Student Researchers will present short oral presentations on their work with a small reception afterwards.

RECCS is a summer research internship program for Colorado community college students. The goal of RECCS is to give community college students an authentic research experience that allows them to explore environmental or geosciences and gain the confidence to transition to a four-year program in the STEM (Science Technology Engineering Math) disciplines.

date

Friday, August 2, 2019
1:00pm to 3:30pm

location

CIRES Auditorium

Amenities

Refreshments provided

contact

Renee.Curry@colorado.edu
2019-08-02
 
 
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Cryosphere and Polar Science Seminar

Cryosphere and Polar Science Seminar

Mapping thermokarst landforms from remote sensing imagery with deep learning by Lin Liu, The Chinese University of Hong Kong

The number and extent of thermokarst landforms in permafrost areas have increased in recent decades. However, their distribution and temporal changes, especially the non-lake ones on the Tibetan Plateau, are poorly understood or quantified. We developed a new strategy to utilize deep learning in the processing of remote sensing imagery.  Applying this method to CubeSats optical images over central Tibet, we delineated 196 retrogressive thaw slumps, with an F1 score of 0.829. By collecting and incorporating more training data, this method can be potentially extended to a large area and help to determine the vulnerability of permafrost landforms to warming.

date

Wednesday, August 7, 2019
11:00am to 12:00pm
MST

location

NSIDC, RL-2, Rooms 153 & 155

Event Type

NSIDC

resources

contact

Mistia Zuckerman

2019-08-07
 
 
 
 
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CIRES Members Council Meeting

CIRES Members Council Meeting

The CIRES Members Council will be meeting to discuss ideas, issues, concerns and questions related to working at CIRES and CU.   All CIRES employees are welcome to attend and propose discussion items.  Please note that lunch is not provided, but we will eat together starting at noon in the meeting room of The Taj Indian Restaurant.  For more details, email CMC Chair, Mistia Zuckerman at mistia.zuckerman@colorado.edu.  

Information about the CMC and division representatives can be found on CMC's website https://cires.colorado.edu/about/institutional-programs/cires-members-council

 

 

date

Monday, August 12, 2019
12:00pm to 2:00pm
MST

location

The Taj 2630 Baseline Rd.

resources

contact

Mistia Zuckerman

2019-08-12
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Fates of Oxygenated Organics in Outdoor and Indoor Environments, Chemical Reactions and Partitioning by Lucas Algrim, ANYL Student, CU Boulder, Ziemann Group

"Volatile organics are emitted in indoor and outdoor environments where they are then subject to various losses such as deposition, or chemical transformation. In outdoor environments chemical reaction dominates, which will create products of higher volatility that stay in the gas phase or products of lower volatility that can partition to the particle phase to generate SOA. In indoor environments, which have lower concentrations of oxidants and greater surface area, deposition to and partitioning with surfaces are of increased relevance.

In the first section of this thesis, Chapters 2-4, we probe SOA forming potential of functionalized precursors. SOA yields were measured for OH radical-initiated reactions of the 2-6 dodecanone, 1-5 decanol, and 1-5 decyl nitrate positional isomers and also n-decane, n-dodecane and n-tetradecane in the presence of NOx. Yields decreased in the order n-tetradecane > dodecanone isomer average > n-dodecane, and the functionalized isomer yields decreased as the functional group moved toward the center of the molecule, with 6-dodecanone being an exception. Trends in the yields can be explained by the effect of carbon number and functional group presence and position on product vapor pressures, and by the isomer-specific effects of the functional group on branching ratios for the various alkoxy radical isomerizations, decompositions, and reactions with O2. Analysis of particle composition indicates within each isomer series, the SOA products are similar for each isomer. The results demonstrate that the presence of a functional group on a precursor alters gas and particle phase chemistry and provide new insights into the potential effects of molecular structure on the products of the atmospheric oxidation of volatile organic compounds.

In the second part of the thesis, Chapter 5, we parameterize the partitioning of VOCs to indoor paint films. Diffusion coefficients, Dc, of organics in a commercial paint were measured and found to correlate well with compound vapor pressures, C*. Experiments were performed by monitoring VOC partitioning in a painted flow tube. A model was constructed to replicate the VOC time traces observed during passivation and depassivation as a function of two parameters, Cw, and Dc. Modeled and measured Dc values agreed reasonably well, and modeled Cw values aligned with those calculated from the mass of paint in the flow tube. The relationship between Dc and C*, and the determination of Cw from mass of paint allow for modeling of VOC partitioning to paint films in indoor environments that indicate >50% of the VOCs with C* of 108 μg m-3 or less that contact a paint film of typical thickness, will fully permeate the paint film, regardless of emission duration."

date

Monday, August 19, 2019
1:00pm to 2:00pm

location

CIRES Auditorium

Event Type

Seminar

contact

Anne.Handschy@Colorado.EDU
2019-08-19
 
 
 
 
 
 
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