Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado Boulder



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Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Soot: So Ubiquitous, So Destructive, So Important, Yet So Elusive: Exploring the Mysteries of Soot Formation

by Prof. Hope Michelsen,
Mechanical Engineering, CU Boulder

"There are substantial gaps in our understanding of the mechanisms controlling soot inception, particle growth, and chemical evolution during combustion. The first steps in soot formation involve the transition of gas-phase hydrocarbon precursors to physically or covalently bound complexes. These complexes are known as “incipient particles”, and the search for their formation and growth mechanisms is a subject of active research [1-3]. These incipient particles undergo further particle growth, generating liquid-like hydrocarbon particles, which eventually reach sizes in the range of 10-50 nm, known as “primary particles” [1-5]. As these particles grow, they also lose hydrogen, solidify, and agglomerate into loosely bound clusters. Under high-temperature conditions, they become graphitic, covalently bound aggregates with a dendritic structure. Soot aggregate sizes, primary-particle sizes, and volume fractions grow as particles age in the flame [4,5]. At high temperatures in the presence of oxygen, the aggregates fragment [6,7], and the primary-particle sizes and volume fractions decrease through oxidation [4,8]. There is a poor understanding of the mechanisms by which particles undergo these transitions and the parameters that influence them. This talk will describe our current understanding of soot formation and the scientific evidence that supports this understanding.

This talk will also cover the gaps in our understanding of soot chemistry, some reasons for these gaps, and what we may need to do in order to bridge these gaps and develop more insight into soot formation and evolution."

[1] H.A. Michelsen, Proc. Combust. Inst. 36, 717 (2017). [2] H. Wang, Proc. Combust. Inst. 33, 41 (2011). [3] K.O. Johansson, M.P. Head-Gordon, P. E. Schrader, K. R. Wilson, H. A. Michelsen, Science 361, 997 (2018). [4] R.A. Dobbins, C.M. Megaridis, Langmuir 3, 254 (1987). [5] R. Puri, T. F. Richardson, R.J. Santoro, R.A. Dobbins, Combust. Flame 92, 320 (1993). [6] K.G. Neoh, J.B. Howard, A.F. Sarofim, Proc. Combust. Inst. 20, 951 (1985). [7] C.A. Echavarria, I.C. Jaramillo, A.F. Sarofim, J.S. Lighty, Proc. Combust. Inst. 33, 659 (2011). [8] K.O. Johansson, F. El Gabaly, P.E. Schrader, M.F. Campbell, H.A. Michelsen, Aerosol Sci. Technol. 51 (12), 1333 (2017).

date

Monday, December 2, 2019
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

Ekeley S274

contact

Anne.Handschy@Colorado.EDU
2019-12-02
 
 
NSIDC Cryosphere Seminar

NSIDC Cryosphere Seminar

Viewing passive microwave sea ice concentrations through a magnifying glass: Investigating the potential of enhanced resolution products by Walt Meier, DAAC Scientist, NSIDC

Sea ice concentrations derived from passive microwave observations are one of the longest satellite-derived climate records and changes in Arctic sea ice cover are one of the most iconic indicators of sea ice change. While passive microwave products provide a consistent long-term record and complete polar coverage, their low spatial resolution limits their ability to discern details in the ice cover and precisely map the sea ice edge. In 2016, the NSIDC NASA Snow and Ice Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) published a new NASA-funded gridded brightness temperature product, the "Calibrated Enhance-Resolution Passive Microwave Daily EASE-Grid 2.0 Brightness Temperatures (CETB)”. This product combines multiple overlapping sensor footprints via signal processing techniques to obtain enhanced resolution gridded brightness temperature fields. Depending on the sensor input, the resolution enhancement is 4 to 8 times higher than the standard gridded products. 

Here we derive sea ice concentrations from these enhanced resolution brightness temperatures. We investigate the potential to obtain finer-scale sea ice information, such as polynyas, and to more precisely define the ice edge. Early results indicated an improvement, but not to the full gridded resolution of the CETB product. This is a result of the resolution enhancement processing that yields a gridded resolution finer than the actual effective resolution. Further investigation has defined an approximate effective resolution and developed a method to optimally “upscale” from the CETB resolution to the optimal effective resolution. Case studies show that open water features missed by the standard resolution concentration products can be captured in concentrations derived from the CETB. The CETB also provides twice-daily fields based on local time of day, morning and evening. The concentration fields from the CETB show a clear difference between morning and evening fields near the ice edge, which yields new information on diurnal effects on sea ice. Finally, the CETB uses better calibrated input swath brightness temperatures, providing more consistency between the multitude of sensors across the 40-year record. Sea ice extent derived from these fields show good consistency, indicating that the CETB would be a suitable source for a new long-term sea ice climate record. 

This project was funded by the CIRES Innovative Research Program. 

date

Wednesday, December 4, 2019
11:00am to 12:00pm
MST

location

Room 155, Research Lab #2

Event Type

NSIDC

resources

contact

Mistia Zuckerman

2019-12-04
 
CSTPR Noontime Seminar

CSTPR Noontime Seminar

Our Connected Planet: Putting Science and Innovation into Action

by Susan Avery, President Emerita, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Innovation for our connected planet requires system understanding:  of the earth, of environmental and human sustainability needs, and of economies.  The societal forces for adaptation and mitigation of climate change requires both social and engineering solutions.  This presentation will illustrate some of that innovation – in science, adaptation, and mitigation – through the lens of systems approaches.  

Susan K. Avery is president emerita of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and professor emeritus at the University of Colorado, Boulder (UCB).  Currently she is serving as a faculty affiliate in the Center for Science and Technology Policy Research at UCB, is a member and chair of the board of trustees of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, and serves on the Exxon Mobil Corporation Board of Directors.   Dr. Avery holds a PhD in atmospheric sciences from the University of Illinois and a BS in physics from Michigan State University.  The author or co-author of over 110 peer-reviewed articles and reports, she has given scientific presentations to a wide variety of lay and professional audiences.   She has been active in Congressional outreach, including testimony and briefings; in US and international consortia dedicated to ocean and atmosphere research, observation, and applications; and worked with the Governor’s committee to develop the Massachusetts Green Economy plan.  Her current service includes the Board of the American Institute of Physics and advisory committees for the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the NSF Office of International Science and Engineering.  Dr. Avery is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the American Meteorological Society, for which she also served as president.  Awards and recognition include honorary degrees from Michigan State University and the University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth; charter membership of the National Associate Program in the National Academy of Sciences; and a Distinguished Alumni Achievement Award from the University of Illinois.

date

Wednesday, December 4, 2019
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

Event Type

CSTPR

resources

2019-12-04
 
CIRES Members Council Meeting December

CIRES Members Council Meeting December

All CIRES Members are invited to join the monthly meeting of CIRES Members Council (CMC). CMC will be meeting to discuss ideas, issues, concerns and questions related to working at CIRES and CU. For more details, email CMC Chair, Alessandro Franchin, at alessandro.franchin@noaa.gov or see the CMC website

date

Thursday, December 5, 2019
12:00pm

location

Taj Restaurant Boulder
2019-12-05
 
CIRES Members Council Meeting December

CIRES Members Council Meeting December

CIRES Members Council
December 5, 2019

12:30pm Meeting called to order

Attendees

  • Chair: Alessandro Franchin, CSL
  • Secretary: Mistia Zuckerman, NSIDC
  • Amanda Morton, Outreach
  • Janice Bytheway, PSL
  • Michael Toy, GSL
  • Ryan Cassotto, Main 
  • Meg Tilton, Main (incoming)
  • Adam Woods, NCEI (online)
  • Aaron Sweeney, NCEI
  • Eric James, GSL
  • Jonathan Kofler, GML
  • Nate Campbell, Main (outgoing)
  • Gaby Petron, GML
  • Molly Hardman, NSIDC
  • Joe Katich, CSL

New Members

Meg Tilton joined CIRES IT as a programmer and does CIRES website development.  

MOTION: Alessandro made a motion to have Meg Tilton join the CMC as a representative of Main Campus, replacing Nate Campbell.  Motion approved unanimously.  

Discussion about whether we needed to vote new members in, because it hasn’t been consistent.  It was concluded that we like the formal process of voting in new members. They do not need to leave the room for the vote.  

CIRES Mentoring Program

Ryan reported that we have 60 people participating with 30 match pairs.  There were 3 extra mentors and 2 mentees. Most of the divisions are coming.  Main Campus and SWPSE has the biggest number of mentors. Feedback has been requested for an organized training session for the mentors.  They are organizing to have a coach to come to this training session.  

CU Family Housing

Ale gave a brief history on the history of the family housing and the 2-year limit for families to stay there.  The latest update is that post-docs now have a 3-year limit, but research scientists have not been granted this.  Ale said that this involves CIRES especially with the number of foreign-nationals and early career scientists. He asked if we should continue to pursue it.  He needs someone to take the lead because he is chair.  

Action Item: Meg, Lucia and Ale will meet and update the housing letter before the next meeting.  

J1 Visa

Ale gave a brief history of the J2 problem.  

Solution idea was that the J2 visa application would be sent in advance so that the paperwork would be done by the time the J1 was ready. We need to have HR on board to understand the issue.  The initial visa cannot be started early, but the renewal could be started early. The J1 is designed more for visitors and the H1B is for people who would be here a long time. The type of visa has to do with the type of work and for how long.  Scholars and visiting researchers are 

Action item:  Molly Hardman is going to contact Janet Garcia before the next meeting.  

Outstanding Performance Awards

Michael Toy reported that OPA announcements will be e-mailed in mid-January.  He asked that CMC members start soliciting volunteers to serve on the OPA committee -- we need both CMC and non-CMC volunteers.

Minutes Protocol

Discussion on how minutes are done.  Mistia Zuckerman or acting secretary will send out the minutes after the meeting.  Within one week from the meeting, the minutes will be reviewed by Adam Woods and then posted to the website.  They will not be voted on, but approval is assumed.

Agenda Protocol

A preliminary agenda will be decided at the end of each meeting and included in the minutes.  It will be finalized about 1-week before each meeting.  

TIAA Retirement Update

Gaby is following up on the retirement  item. The CIRES member, Gaby and Jonathan will be meeting with a specific person from HR.  There will not be an update until January.  

Onboarding Procedure

Lucia, Aaron and Eric working on this already.  New central HR process is excellent.

How do we integrate on the specific group, because each one has its own structure and culture.  On campus, there are more resources than at NOAA. This will be discussed again next month.  

Best Meeting Day

Ale sent out a survey to see which day of the week is best for people.   All of the days have at least 1 zeros. It was decided that the next meeting will be Thursday, Jan. 12 at the Taj.  

Agenda items for Jan. 9

  • Update on J1 issue
  • Update on Family Housing
  • Update on TIAA
  • Update on Organizing Documents for CMC
  • Update on onboarding
  • Update on OPAs
  • Update on CIRES Climate Change Mental Healthy (Gaby)
  • Update on CIres Rendezvous?

date

Thursday, December 5, 2019
12:00pm

location

resources

2019-12-05
 
 
 
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