Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado Boulder



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Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Experimental Investigation of the Particle-Phase Products and Reaction Mechanism of Δ-3-Carene with NO3 Radicals

Marla DeVault,
ANYL 3rd year, Ziemann Group

"Oxidation products of monoterpenes have been shown to contribute to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation in the atmosphere. However, the nighttime oxidative processes, which are dominated by nitrate radical (NO3) addition to alkenes, are not well understood. In order to fill this gap, I am working to quantify the yields of particle-phase products of the nitrate radical-initiated oxidation of Δ-3-carene, a monoterpene that is primarily emitted by coniferous plants. Using functional groups analysis methods, liquid chromatography with UV-Vis detection, and electrospray and electron ionization mass spectrometry to characterize SOA formed in environmental chamber reactions, I have identified a series of acetal dimers. The mechanism derived from these measured particle-phase products will help to inform chemical transport models on the contribution of nighttime oxidation of monoterpenes to SOA. In addition, these acetal dimers are analogous to those that have been identified and quantified in the β-pinene + NO3 radical system, and appear to form from reactions of a variety of monoterpenes."

date

Monday, February 3, 2020
12:00pm

location

Ekeley S274

Event Type

Seminar

resources

Amenities

Lunch provided

contact

Anne.Handschy@colorado.edu
2020-02-03
 
 
NSIDC Cryosphere Seminar

NSIDC Cryosphere Seminar

Bering Strait Oceanic Volume and Heat Transports and Links to Atmospheric Circulation, Ocean Temperature and Sea Ice Conditions by Dr. Mark Serreze

The Arctic’s Chukchi Sea is a focus of resource exploration, and all vessels transiting the Arctic Ocean must pass through it.   However, operations in this area are strongly influenced by variability in sea ice conditions.  Our recent work shows that the Bering Strait oceanic heat inflow is a key predictor of seasonal sea ice retreat and advance dates in the Chukchi Sea.  But what are the divers of this variability?  This inflow represents an interplay between water temperature in the strait and factors controlling the volume transport, namely, local winds in the strait and a pressure head difference between the Pacific and Arctic.  Variability in the pressure head difference, especially during summer, relates to the strength of the zonal (west to east) wind in the East Siberian Sea that raises or drops sea surface height in this area.  Variability in the zonal wind in the East Siberian Sea during summer relates to a tendency for winds over the Arctic Ocean to vary between clockwise and anticlockwise, linking the Bering Strait transports to processes influencing September sea ice extent for the Arctic Ocean as a whole.  Some of the most recent large heat transports are associated with high water temperatures, consistent with recent persistence of open water in the Chukchi Sea into winter and early ice retreat in spring.  The highest inflow recorded, for October 2016, resulted from high water temperatures in the strait and ideal wind conditions yielding a record-high volume transport.

Mark Serreze, Director of the National Snow and Ice Data Center and Professor of Geography at the University of Colorado Boulder, has published widely on issues of Arctic environmental change and has played a prominent role in science communication. His widely acclaimed popular science book, “Brave New Arctic”, was published in April 2018.  https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1029/2019JC015422

 

 

 

date

Wednesday, February 5, 2020
11:00am to 12:00pm
Mountain

location

Room 155, Research Lab #2

Event Type

NSIDC

resources

contact

Mistia Zuckerman

2020-02-05
 
 
 
 
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Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Revisiting dry deposition of trace gases and particles in the atmosphere

Delphine K. Farmer
Associate Professor, Department of Chemistry, Colorado State University

"Dry deposition is a key process that removes trace gases and particles from the atmosphere, and thus one factor that controls the atmospheric lifetime of pollutants and short-lived climate forcers. In fact, dry deposition is the single largest component of uncertainty in our understanding of aerosol effects on climate. Despite its importance, dry deposition of trace gases and particles is poorly constrained by observations due to the instrumental challenge in measuring surface-atmosphere exchange. Instruments must be adequately fast, sensitive and selective to measure low concentrations on the rapid (<1 s) timescale of turbulence. We have developed several measurement techniques that use the eddy covariance approach to flux measurements over terrestrial surfaces incorporating both spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. This talk will be divided into two parts – the first considering the mechanisms that control forest-atmosphere exchange of acidic organic molecules, and the second revisiting our understanding of size-resolved particle deposition in the atmosphere. We contrast these observations with previous measurements in the literature, and with commonly used resistance models, highlighting several model-measurement discrepancies. To further investigate the mechanisms of particle deposition, we use black carbon deposition as an inert tracer for particle wet and dry deposition. We show that wet deposition dominates in an agricultural environment in Oklahoma, and provide observational constraints on black carbon lifetime in this region. Our suite of observations inform a revised model parameterization, which we incorporate in a global chemical transport model to investigate how dry deposition can impact particle loading and the radiative balance of the atmosphere. Together, these new measurements highlight the importance of observational constraints in developing, validating, and revising models of fundamental chemical and physical processes in the atmosphere – and in reducing uncertainties in our understanding of climate."

date

Monday, February 10, 2020
12:00pm

location

Ekeley S274

Event Type

Seminar

resources

Amenities

Lunch provided

contact

Anne.Handschy@colorado.edu
2020-02-10
 
CU Boulder & The Conversation

CU Boulder & The Conversation

CU Boulder joined The Conversation  last year, and the results have been impressive: Experts in sea ice and nanotechnology, the history of mathematics and groundwater have penned dozens of essays that have been read by tens of thousands of people on theconversation.com and reprinted in >100 other outlets.

How can you work with The Conversation, and how does it work? What are the benefits of writing short articles on timely topics related to your research?

Please join a lunchtime conversation with chief innovation officer Bruce Wilson and environment & energy editor Jenny Weeks and several CU Boulder researchers who have worked already with The Conversation—Mark Serreze (NSIDC Director), Lupita Montoya (researcher, Engineering) and Matthew Coggon and Aaron Lamplugh (CIRES researchers in NOAA).

Space is limited to 40 people so RSVP is required (eventbrite). Lunch is provided.

date

Tuesday, February 11, 2020
12:00pm to 1:00pm
Mountain

location

Ekeley S274

Event Type

Seminar

resources

Amenities

Refreshments provided

contact

Katy Human (kathleen.human@colorado.edu)
2020-02-11
 
ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC Weekly Coffee

*On Feb 12th ESOC Coffee Hour will be held in the Aerospace building, 4th Floor Atrium. 

ESOC coffee hour occurs weekly from 9-10am in the ESOC Reading Room (Ekeley W230). ESOC researchers, post-docs and graduate students gather for conversation and to discuss research. Occasional guest speakers are invited to give short presentations on topics of interest.

date

Wednesday, February 12, 2020
9:00am to 10:00am

Amenities

Refreshments provided

contact

Claire Waugh; waughc@colorado.edu
2020-02-12
 
CIRES Members Council Meeting February 2020

CIRES Members Council Meeting February 2020

All CIRES Members are invited to join the monthly meeting of CIRES Members Council (CMC) at the Taj Restaurant in Boulder. CMC will be meeting to discuss ideas, issues, concerns and questions related to working at CIRES and CU. For more details, email CMC Chair, Alessandro Franchin, at alessandro.franchin@noaa.gov. or see the CMC website

date

Thursday, February 13, 2020
12:00pm
2020-02-13
 
 
 
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Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

The Role of H2S in Photochemical Methane Haze Experiments

Nathan Reed,
ANYL 3rd year student, Browne / Tolbert Groups), CU Boulder

"Although sulfur gases and organic haze from methane photochemistry are thought to be present in numerous planetary atmospheres, including the atmosphere of the Archean Earth (2.5-3.5 bya), direct interactions between their chemistries have historically been neglected. This assumption may limit the understanding of atmospheric sulfur and organic haze chemistry, and it would therefore be beneficial to examine photochemical haze production with sulfur gases present. Organic haze laboratory studies including H2S, an atmospheric sulfur gas with both biogenic and abiogenic (e.g. volcanic) sources, have until now been non-existent. To better understand the role of H2S in organic haze chemistry, I have conducted UV photochemistry experiments of CH4 gas mixtures in N2 with the inclusion of trace amounts of H2S. I investigated the product aerosol composition, number, and size distribution as a function of H2S mixing ratio. It was found that increasing the H2S mixing ratio increased the organic aerosol effective density, number, and mass loading. Further, organic sulfur compounds were found to form in the aerosol phase. I will discuss the importance of these findings in the context of organic haze and sulfur chemistry, possible mechanisms, and future steps for the project."

date

Monday, February 17, 2020
12:00pm

location

Ekeley S274

Event Type

Seminar

resources

Amenities

Lunch provided

Refreshments provided

contact

Anne.Handschy@colorado.edu
2020-02-17
 
 
ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC coffee hour occurs weekly from 9-10am in the ESOC Reading Room (Ekeley W230). ESOC researchers, post-docs and graduate students gather for conversation and to discuss research. Occasional guest speakers are invited to give short presentations on topics of interest.

date

Wednesday, February 19, 2020
9:00am to 10:00am

location

Ekeley W230

Amenities

Refreshments provided

contact

Claire Waugh; waughc@colorado.edu
2020-02-19
 
NSIDC Cryosphere Seminar

NSIDC Cryosphere Seminar

Biogeochemical, Ecological, and Societal Impacts of Thermokarst in Permafrost soils by Merritt R. Turetsky, Director of INSTAAR and Associate Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology 

Permafrost thaw is altering northern ecosystems and the services they provide at scales ranging from local subsidence to global climate feedbacks. In organic-rich peatlands, thermokarst initiation and spread rates are increasing with rising mean annual air temperatures, changes in wildfire, and human land use. This presentation will outline empirical and modeling approaches to better understand the consequences of thermokarst in peatlands on carbon cycling, wildlife, and other aspects of ecosystem services.  We are using fine scale datasets and remote sensing to map thermoakarst coverage and expansion in both the Northwest Territories, Canada and interior Alaska. Using chronosequences and regional gradients, we are studying thermokarst impacts along gradients of time-since-thaw. Through a Permafrost Carbon Network synthesis, we developed conceptual and numerical models to understand how thermokarst development (formation, stabilization, re-accumulation of permafrost in some conditions) affects carbon storage and release. We are using a combination of empirical and modelled data to test hypotheses about climatic, ecological, and Quaternary controls on thermokarst rates and subsequent impacts on ecosystem services. We demonstrate that thermokarst in peat-rich landscapes are hotspots for permafrost carbon release primarily through methane emissions, have the potential to impact hunter movement and safety, and affect caribou habitat quality.

date

Wednesday, February 19, 2020
11:00am to 12:00pm
MST

location

room 155, Research Lab #2

Event Type

NSIDC

resources

contact

Mistia Zuckerman

2020-02-19
 
 
 
 
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ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC coffee hour occurs weekly from 9-10am in the ESOC Reading Room (Ekeley W230). ESOC researchers, post-docs and graduate students gather for conversation and to discuss research. Occasional guest speakers are invited to give short presentations on topics of interest.

date

Wednesday, February 26, 2020
9:00am to 10:00am

location

Ekeley W230

Amenities

Refreshments provided

contact

Claire Waugh; waughc@colorado.edu
2020-02-26
 
CSTPR Noontime Seminar

CSTPR Noontime Seminar

Materiality of the virtual: Digital technology and the climate crisis?

by Hunter Vaughan, Media Studies in the College of Media, Communication, & Information, University of Colorado Boulder

Abstract: Increasingly integral to many facets of everyday life, digital technology has emerged as a crucial tool for climate science, environmental communication, global environmental movement organizing, and popular culture messaging strategies relating to climate change. However, the digital revolution also has enormous material environmental impacts, and has been a driving force in reshaping global dynamics of resource mining, labor rights violations, greenhouse gas emissions, toxic pollution, and energy infrastructure demands. Dr. Vaughan will address this paradox of the digital era: from undersea cables to orbiting satellites, from Icelandic server farms to digital dumping grounds in Ghana, the digital era is both enabling climate science and climate change activism, and wiring the planet to perpetuate the very anthropogenic practices that have invoked the climate crisis.

Biography: A cultural historian and environmental media scholar, Hunter Vaughan's research, service, and teaching focus on the relationship between media, ethics, social power and the environment.  His most recent monograph, Hollywood's Dirtiest Secret: the Hidden Environmental Costs of the Movies (Columbia University Press, 2019), is an ecocritical and materialist counter-narrative to Hollywood history, merging industry and archive study, production culture studies, textual analysis, sociological approaches to epistemology and power, and environmental studies to analyze the environmental ramifications of film practices. He is co-PI (with Pietari Kaapa, University of Warwick) on an AHRC grant to build a Global Green Media Production Network, based in the UK and Europe and with pilot studies in East Asia, India, and Latin America to facilitate green film production initiatives in conjunction with local media professionals, policy makers, and environmental experts. He is the author of Where Film Meets Philosophy (Columbia University Press, 2013); Founding Editor (with Meryl Shriver-Rice) of the interdisciplinary Journal of Environmental Media (Intellect Press); and co-editor with Tom Conley, of the Anthem Handbook of Screen Theory (Anthem Press, 2018). His current scholarship focuses on bridges between environmental humanities, media studies, and social sciences, including a study of the role of digital media in heritage sites and cultural institutions, analyzing the use of screen technologies (such as 3-D projections, immersive media, and augmented reality apps) in the construction of local identity in the era of globalization; a reception study addressing the efficacy of short-form environmental messaging; and a research and outreach project on interactive media, storytelling, and visions of climate futures in education.

date

Wednesday, February 26, 2020
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

CSTPR Conference Room

Event Type

CSTPR

resources

2020-02-26