Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado Boulder



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CGA Resume/CV Writing Workshop

CGA Resume/CV Writing Workshop

Join Cat Diebel-Wilson from CU Graduate Student Career Services for a CV/Resume workshop. You will learn best practices for formatting, wording, and representing yourself in the best way possible on your resume to get the job you want. Event hosted by the CIRES Graduate Association.

You can access the workshop using the following Google Meet link:
https://meet.google.com/ztu-zaqg-rao 

Contact Lauren Schmeisser, CGA Co-chair, lauren.schmeisser@noaa.gov

Date

Friday, April 2, 2021
2021 - 09:30 to 11:00

Host

  • CGA
2021-04-02
 
 
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2021 Annual Summary of Accomplishments Training

2021 Annual Summary of Accomplishments Training

Please join Lucia Harrop, CIRES Admin, and the CIRES HR team for training on the Annual Summary of Accomplishments (ASA) Monday, April 5 from 10-11am, for employees embedded at the NOAA labs.

The ASA is a yearly requirement for most CIRES employees and their supervisors. This training will provide an overview of the CIRES ASA process and timelines, and will also cover changes from last year. Particularly relevant for new hires, or those who are new to supervisory roles. Science advisor input is also very helpful in this process, and federal partners are welcome to attend the overview.

Angela Knight, CIRES HR Director and Christine Wiedinmyer, CIRES Associate Director for Science, will be available to answer any questions you may have.

Join via Zoom, or phone one-tap: US: +16699006833,,98556225139# or +12532158782,,98556225139#

 

**Note: A separate session will be held Monday, April 12 from 10-11am, for CU Boulder campus-based employees. Both sessions will also be recorded and posted to insideCIRES for those who can't make it.

Date

Monday, April 5, 2021
2021 - 10:00 to 11:00

Link

Host

  • CIRES

Audience

  • CIRES employees

Type

  • Training

Resources

2021-04-05
 
Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Aerosol optical closure and long-term MAX-DOAS observations

Christopher Lee,
ANYL 3rd year student, Volkamer group

"Aerosols remain a major source of uncertainty in the global radiative budget. Studies that combine vertically-resolved measurements of aerosol size distributions and refractive index (inferred from aerosol composition measurements) are needed to assess our understanding of multispectral aerosol optical closure. Here we use data from the NASA airborne HSRL-2 instrument, which retrieves aerosol extinction profiles at 355, 532, and 1064 nm from backscatter measurements. The dataset we use is from the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) in July 2012, which deployed two research aircraft above the DoE ARM mobile facility at Cape Cod, MA. This dataset is reanalyzed here to investigate the effects of aerosol water on dry aerosol size and composition, and our ability to constrain Mie calculations to obtain multispectral optical closure.

High-altitude ground-based remote sensing is well-suited for long-term profile measurements of trace gases and aerosols, and provides unique sensitivity to the free troposphere. An example of this is the University of Colorado Multi-AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU MAX-DOAS) instrument, which measures vertical profiles of trace gases (BrO, IO, HCHO, CHOCHO, NO2, O3, SO2, H2O, etc.) and aerosols. Since February 2017, two CU MAX-DOAS instruments have operated continuously at Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii (155.578 W, 19.539 N, 3397 msl) and Maido Observatory, Reunion Island (55.384 E, 21.080 S, 2160 msl), respectively. In March 2021, a third CU MAX-DOAS instrument was deployed at Storm Peak Laboratory (106.744 W, 40.455 N, 3209 msl) in Steamboat Springs, Colorado. Leveraging the data from these three measurement sites, the vertically-resolved spatiotemporal variation of trace gases and aerosols can be characterized in both hemispheres."

Date

Monday, April 5, 2021
2021 - 12:30

Host

  • CIRES

Audience

  • CIRES employees
  • CU Boulder employees
  • NOAA employees
  • Science collaborators

Type

  • Seminar
  • Open to Public

contact

anne.handschy@colorado.edu
2021-04-05
 
CIRES Town Hall

CIRES Town Hall

Please join CIRES Director Waleed Abdalati for another CIRES Town Hall on Tuesday, April 6, 2021, for both CU Boulder and NOAA-based employees. 

 

If you have a question you’d like the Director to address, please send it in (signed or anonymously) by Monday at 3pm through https://insidecires.colorado.edu/news/surveyfaqs.html

 

Join by Zoom:

https://cuboulder.zoom.us/j/94063307415

Date

Tuesday, April 6, 2021
2021 - 09:00 to 10:00

Link

Host

  • CIRES

Audience

  • CIRES employees

Type

  • Meeting

Resources

2021-04-06
 
ESOC Virtual Coffee Hour

ESOC Virtual Coffee Hour

ESOC virtual coffee hour occurs weekly from 9-10am on Wednesdays. We will be meeting remotely on Zoom. Please email Claire Waugh (waughc@colorado.edu) for information.

ESOC researchers, post-docs and graduate students gather for conversation and to discuss research. Occasional guest speakers are invited to give short presentations on topics of interest.

Date

Wednesday, April 7, 2021
2021 - 09:00 to 10:00

Host

  • ESOC

Audience

  • CIRES employees
  • CU Boulder employees
  • NOAA employees
  • Science collaborators

Type

  • Meeting

contact

Claire Waugh; waughc@colorado.edu

Location

2021-04-07
 
NC CASC Webinar Series: "Demographic uncertainty and disease risk drive climate-informed mountain goat management"

NC CASC Webinar Series: "Demographic uncertainty and disease risk drive climate-informed mountain goat management"

Thursday, April 8, 2021, 11a -12p MDT

Presented by: Justin Gude, Wildlife Research & Technical Services Bureau Chief, Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks

Register in advance for this meeting:

https://cuboulder.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJYsc-GgqjooEtO1BVH4MgBmHjTjJ...

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting. 

Abstract:
Concerns about mountain goats have arisen in many areas in recent years. Climate change may negatively affect this alpine ungulate, and recent evidence indicates that mountain goats harbor respiratory pathogens associated with pneumonia epidemics in bighorn sheep. Mountain goat demographic and population data are difficult to collect and sparsely available, exacerbating these concerns. We used a structured decision making process to address these issues and uncertainties, building from a successful track record of using this approach to make management program decisions in Montana, USA. Our analysis predicted that translocations to establish new mountain goat populations would result in more area occupied by mountain goats at mid-century, regardless of the effects of climate change. We found that various management actions may improve population trends, although this was associated with considerable uncertainty. Value of information analyses revealed that more information about population dynamics, the presence of pneumonia-associated pathogens, and the consequences of mixing microbial communities during translocations will affect choices among alternative management actions. Optimal management choices also varied by individual risk tolerance for disease transmission, because translocations are expected to increase disease risks for mountain goats and sympatric bighorn sheep. We recommend that managers determine the tolerance for disease risks associated with translocations that they and constituents are willing to accept. From this, an adaptive management program can be constructed wherein a portfolio of management actions are chosen based on risk tolerance in each population, combined with the amount that uncertainty is reduced when paired with monitoring, to improve mountain goat conservation efforts.

About the speaker:
Justin Gude has been the Wildlife Research & Technical Services (RTS) Bureau Chief for Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks (FWP) since 2008. The RTS Bureau consists of wildlife research, health, biometrics, and survey programs, and their work covers a variety of taxa ranging in size from songbirds and bats to moose, in all corners of the state. Justin is responsible for overseeing the work of the RTS Bureau as well as ensuring integration of the wildlife research and management programs at FWP, so he is often involved in facilitating working groups such as that described in this presentation. He completed the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Decision Analysis Certification Program and has been involved in many structured decision-making processes, and he also is on the NC CASC- USDA Northern Plains Regional Climate Hub Joint Stakeholder Committee.

Past NC CASC Webinar Recordings: https://nccasc.colorado.edu/webinars

Dates for future NC CASC webinars:

April 8, 2021, 11a-12p MDT

May 13, 2021, 11a-12p MDT

June 10, 2021, 11a-12p MDT

July 8, 2021, 11a-12p MDT

August 12, 2021, 11a-12p MDT

September 9, 2021, 11a-12p MDT

October 14, 2021, 11a-12p MDT

November 11, 2021, 11a-12p MST

December 9, 2021, 11a-12p MST

Date

Thursday, April 8, 2021
2021 - 11:00

Host

  • NCCASC

Audience

  • General Public

Type

  • Other
  • Open to Public
2021-04-08
 
 
 
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2021 Annual Summary of Accomplishments Training

2021 Annual Summary of Accomplishments Training

Please join Lucia Harrop, CIRES Admin, and the CIRES HR team for training on the Annual Summary of Accomplishments (ASA) Monday, April 12 from 10-11am, for CU Boulder campus-based employees.

The ASA is a yearly requirement for most CIRES employees and their supervisors. This training will provide an overview of the CIRES ASA process and timelines, and will also cover changes from last year. Particularly relevant for new hires, or those who are new to supervisory roles. Science advisor input is also very helpful in this process, and federal partners are welcome to attend the overview.

Angela Knight, CIRES HR Director and Christine Wiedinmyer, CIRES Associate Director for Science, will be available to answer any questions you may have.

Join via Zoom, or phone one-tap: US:  +13462487799,,92901998573# or +16699006833,,92901998573#

 

**Note: A separate session will be held Monday, April 5 from 10-11am, for employees embedded at the NOAA labs. Both sessions will also be recorded and posted to insideCIRES for those who can't make it.

Date

Monday, April 12, 2021
2021 - 10:00 to 11:00

Link

Host

  • CIRES

Audience

  • CIRES employees

Type

  • Training

Resources

2021-04-12
 
Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

OS and pH estimation from AMS measurements and OH oxidation of phenolic compounds in wildfire smoke

Melinda Schueneman,
ANYL 3rd year student, [cires1.colorado.edu/jimenez-group/ Jimenez Group]

"This talk will focus on two unrelated research projects: the first will highlight a paper recently published in AMT, and the second will introduce and show preliminary results for a biomass burning project. Shortened abstracts are included here for reference.

Part I: Sulfate can be present in aerosols as inorganic (mainly ammonium sulfate, AS) or organosulfate (OS). Although OS is thought to be a smaller fraction of total sulfate in most cases, recent literature argues that this may not be the case in more polluted environments. Two new methods have been proposed to quantify OS separately from AS with AMS data. We use observations collected during several airborne field campaigns covering a wide range of sources and air mass ages and targeted laboratory experiments to investigate the proposed OS methods. Four chemical regimes are defined. In polluted areas with high ammonium nitrate concentrations and in remote areas with high aerosol acidity, the decomposition and fragmentation of sulfate in the AMS is influenced by multiple complex effects, and estimation of OS does not seem possible with current methods. In regions with lower acidity (pH > 0) and ammonium nitrate (fraction of total mass < 0.3), the proposed OS methods might be more reliable, although application of these methods often produced nonsensical results. Under highly acidic conditions (when calculated pH < 0 and ammonium balance < 0.65), sulfate fragment ratios show a clear relationship with acidity. The measured ammonium balance is a promising indicator of rapid estimation of aerosol pH < 0, including when gas-phase NH3 and HNO3 are not available. These results allow an improved understanding of important intensive properties of ambient aerosols.

Part II: The intensity and frequency of fires has been sharply increasing with an expanding population, increased land clearing for agriculture, and climate change. Fire plumes introduce large amounts of diverse chemical species into the atmosphere. The abundant emissions of VOCs, particles, and NOx suggest that substantial aerosol formation should occur downwind of fires. However, typically no enhancement of total OA is observed in most field studies. To explore the relationship between POA and SOA in aging smoke, we use measurements from the Extractive Electrospray Soft Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (EESI) taken during FIREX-AQ, along with EESI and Vocus measurements from chamber experiments. A suite of laboratory chamber experiments, targeting known and suspected BB SOA precursors, are being conducted to identify key tracer species in this system, for both the particle and gas phases. Key chemical species from the OH initiated oxidation of phenol, catechol, and styrene were identified from chamber studies and their formation and evolution were modeled with KinSim. Some identified products were calibrated for and identified in a FIREX-AQ research flight, and one plume was also modelled in KinSim. We present preliminary results from the analysis of these observations."

Date

Monday, April 12, 2021
2021 - 12:30

Host

  • CIRES
  • CU Boulder

Audience

  • CIRES employees
  • CU Boulder employees
  • NOAA employees
  • Science collaborators

Type

  • Seminar
  • Open to Public

contact

anne.handschy@colorado.edu
2021-04-12
 
 
ESOC Virtual Coffee Hour

ESOC Virtual Coffee Hour

ESOC virtual coffee hour occurs weekly from 9-10am on Wednesdays. We will be meeting remotely on Zoom. Please email Claire Waugh (waughc@colorado.edu) for information.

ESOC researchers, post-docs and graduate students gather for conversation and to discuss research. Occasional guest speakers are invited to give short presentations on topics of interest.

Date

Wednesday, April 14, 2021
2021 - 09:00 to 10:00

Host

  • ESOC

Audience

  • CIRES employees
  • CU Boulder employees
  • NOAA employees
  • Science collaborators

Type

  • Meeting

contact

Claire Waugh; waughc@colorado.edu

Location

2021-04-14
 
NSIDC Cryosphere Seminar

NSIDC Cryosphere Seminar

Arctic Arts:  A Voice for Science with Kerry Koepping and Andrea Sparrow

The Arctic Arts Project is a team of visual communicators. Through spectacular imagery in film and photography, we document the science of our changing planet, interpreting scientific data to give the public an opportunity to understand how climate change is altering the earth’s systems, and to see what that looks like. We travel to the Arctic most frequently as the pace of change there is so significant and happening so quickly. We also focus on solutions and adaptations at every opportunity, to help people avoid a sense of despair and helplessness. Our job is to bring the current science to life, giving it a visual voice and compelling context.

Find out about the Arctic Arts Project and our team of visual communicators, scientists and educators at arcticartsproject.com

View Arctic Art's short film Climate Chaos: Ice 

"Climate Chaos: Relevance" is a snapshot into the work of the Arctic Arts Team of communicators and their quest to educate the world on the relevance of climate change.  

 

Kerry Koepping - Executive Director of the The Arctic Arts Project and Research Affiliate at the Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, University of Colorado.  Kerry is an internationally acclaimed environmental photographer, visionary, and communicator dedicated to the stewardship of the environment and the Arctic. He is the founder of the non-profit Arctic Arts Project and is dedicated to strengthening environmental sustainability by illuminating environmental problems and issues through the use of science and visual literacy.

Andrea Sparrow, Executive Producer of the The Arctic Arts Project.  Traveling the planet has given Andrea a window into the natural world, from the tiniest plants and creatures to the great vistas gained from the air. Andrea is an artist, a scientist and an explorer at heart, driven by a desire to understand and possibly, through her visual communications mediums, help change the trajectory on which we find ourselves.

Date

Wednesday, April 14, 2021
2021 - 11:00 to 12:00
MDT

Link

Host

  • NSIDC

Audience

  • CIRES employees
  • CIRES families
  • CU Boulder employees
  • General Public
  • NOAA employees
  • Science collaborators

Type

  • Seminar
  • Open to Public

Resources

contact

Mistia Zuckerman

Location

2021-04-14
 
 
 
 
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Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Submicron Particle Composition and Acidity in Fire Plumes during FIREX-AQ aircraft study (1/2 seminar)

Hongyu Guo, Postdoctoral Fellow, Jimenez Group

And

Emissions, Partitioning, and Aging of Biomass Burning Organic Aerosol at FIREX-AQ (1/2 seminar)

Demetrios Pagonis, Postdoctoral Fellow, Jimenez Group

 

Guo:

"During the Fire Influence on Regional to Global Environments and Air Quality (FIREX-AQ) aircraft study, the chemical composition of fire-emitted submicron particles was quantified with a High- Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS). The western wildfire-emitted particles show similar composition across the plumes and are overwhelmingly dominated by organic aerosol (OA). The eastern agricultural fires show larger variability in particle composition with a higher inorganic fraction, in particular Cl and K. Fast (1 or 5 Hz) measurements of K in fire plumes, which show excellent correlation with SAGA filter measurements, allow a quantitative closure of the particle anion/cation balance. Although lab experiments suggest variable AMS relative ionization efficiency (RIE) of K for mixed K inorganic salts, field observations indicate a uniform RIE for fresh fire-emitted particles dominated by OA. SO4 in some fresh biomass burning plumes (both wild and agricultural fires) had major contributions from organosulfur species (as quantified by two separate methods), vs. typically a few percent in regional background air. This is consistent with limited previous observations (DC3, FLAME-3). The AMS inorganic SO4 agrees better with SAGA-MC SO4, as expected from the ion chromatography detection of the latter instrument. The organosulfur appears to be dominantly a primary emission and was removed on a similar timescale as fresh primary biomass burning OA (BBOA). Ultrahigh-resolution analysis of FIREX-AQ filter samples is used to aid in the identification of the organosulfur species. Lastly, we use thermodynamic models to estimate aerosol pH, an important lever on many particulate physical and chemical processes, based on AMS-quantified K, inorganic-only SO4, pNO3 and collocated gas measurements (NH3 and HNO3). The fresh western biomass burning particles had near-neutral pH (on average ~6), which was buffered by high levels of NH3 and contrasts with far lower pH observed for continental (~1-4) and remote oceanic (~0) submicron particles. Regional background particles during FIREX-AQ show moderate acidity (pH~3), which indicates drastically different rates for H + -influenced processes inside and outside of the plumes."

Pagonis:

"The chemical composition of biomass burning organic aerosol (OA) evolves rapidly as it is transported downwind of a fire. Changes in composition are driven by dilution, evaporation, and secondary OA (SOA) production. Here we present airborne OA measurements from an extractive electrospray mass spectrometer (EESI) and an Aerodyne high-resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) during FIREX-AQ. By combining the bulk OA composition measured by AMS with speciated OA composition measured by EESI, we quantify the relative contributions of SOA production and primary OA (POA) evaporation to the evolution of OA composition downwind of wildland fires. Evaporation rates of bulk OA and levoglucosan (a component of POA) are quantified through a combination of thermodenuder measurements and sampling smoke plumes at varying ambient temperatures. Rates of SOA production are quantified through measurements of individual SOA components by EESI, and through positive matrix factorization of AMS spectra. We observe SOA production rates exceeding 100 μg sm -3 h -1 (standard conditions 273 K, 1013 mbar) and simultaneously measure evaporation of POA components, with minimal change in dilution-corrected OA concentration; this provides direct evidence for balance in SOA production and POA evaporation rates in near-field aging of biomass burning OA."

Date

Monday, April 19, 2021
2021 - 12:30

Host

  • CIRES
  • CU Boulder

Audience

  • CIRES employees
  • CU Boulder employees
  • NOAA employees
  • Science collaborators

Type

  • Seminar
  • Open to Public

contact

anne.handschy@colorado.edu
2021-04-19
 
 
ESOC Virtual Coffee Hour

ESOC Virtual Coffee Hour

ESOC virtual coffee hour occurs weekly from 9-10am on Wednesdays. We will be meeting remotely on Zoom. Please email Claire Waugh (waughc@colorado.edu) for information.

ESOC researchers, post-docs and graduate students gather for conversation and to discuss research. Occasional guest speakers are invited to give short presentations on topics of interest.

Date

Wednesday, April 21, 2021
2021 - 09:00 to 10:00

Host

  • ESOC

Audience

  • CIRES employees
  • CU Boulder employees
  • NOAA employees
  • Science collaborators

Type

  • Meeting

contact

Claire Waugh; waughc@colorado.edu

Location

2021-04-21
 
NSIDC Cryosphere Seminar

NSIDC Cryosphere Seminar

Mapping Abrupt Permafrost Thaw from Space Using Machine Learning by Dr. Lingcao Huang, CIRES

Permafrost is undergoing strong warming and thawing in recent decades, which can potentially cause unprecedented environmental consequences as it stores a large amount of carbon and underlays about 25% of the exposed land in the northern hemisphere. Abrupt thawing of ice-rich permafrost may result in landforms such as retrogressive thaw slumps and thermo-erosion gullies on the Earth’s surface. As reported by many local studies, the occurrence and frequency of abrupt permafrost thaw have increased significantly. However, its spatial distribution and development in most permafrost areas are poorly quantified, which hinders the understanding of permafrost degradation in large areas. The reason for this is the difficultly of analyzing big data and extracting small and subtle features on images. In the past decades, the accumulation of satellite data and the advance of machine learning algorithms, especially convolutional neural networks, make it possible to tackle this problem.  In this talk, I will present my research of using high-resolution () satellite data and machine learning algorithms to map these landforms in Tibet and Alaska north slope.

Lingcao Huang is a CIRES visiting Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Colorado Boulder. His current research focuses on mapping the spatial distribution and development of ice-rich permafrost abrupt thawing in Alaska north slope from various remote sensing data using machine learning. He received Bachelor and Master degrees in remote sensing & photogrammetry at Wuhan University and a Doctoral degree in earth and atmospheric sciences at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. 

Date

Wednesday, April 21, 2021
2021 - 11:00 to 12:00
MDT

Link

Host

  • NSIDC

Audience

  • CIRES employees
  • CIRES families
  • CU Boulder employees
  • General Public
  • NOAA employees
  • Science collaborators

Type

  • Seminar
  • Open to Public

Resources

contact

Mistia Zuckerman

2021-04-21
 
CIRES Members' Council Meeting

CIRES Members' Council Meeting

Please join the CMC for their monthly meeting. Items to be discussed will include the upcoming Rendezvous, recruiting new members, and OPA summary.  Join by Google Meet or phone:  (US) +1 402-285-2380 (PIN: 335741626).

Date

Thursday, April 22, 2021
2021 - 12:00 to 13:30

Link

Host

  • CMC

Audience

  • CIRES employees

Type

  • Meeting

Resources

contact

Aaron Sweeney
Photo of Aaron Sweeney

2021-04-22
 
 
 
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Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

An extraterrestrial start and a volcanic end to the Cretaceous-Paleogene mass extinction?

Prof. Boswell Wing,
CU Boulder, Geological Sciences

"The Cretaceous–Paleogene (KPg) mass extinction is one of the “big five” mass extinctions that occurred during the last 550 million years. Although geological records of the KPg transition preserve ample evidence of an impact, there is significant controversy about whether this impact was the sole mass extinction trigger, or whether volcanism from the Deccan traps contributed significantly to the sudden onset of the biotic crisis. In this presentation I will discuss how precise measurements of the ratio of 34S-32S in KPg sediments at high-spatial resolution can trace atmospheric sulfur injections from these two events in the immediate vicinity of the KPg extinction horizon."

Date

Monday, April 26, 2021
2021 - 12:30

Host

  • CIRES
  • CU Boulder

Audience

  • CIRES employees
  • CU Boulder employees
  • NOAA employees
  • Science collaborators

Type

  • Seminar
  • Open to Public

contact

anne.handschy@colorado.edu
2021-04-26
 
 
2021 Rendezvous Poster Upload Deadline

2021 Rendezvous Poster Upload Deadline

The poster submission deadline for CIRES' 16th annual Rendezvous is TODAY!

 

Uploads and any supplementary material) are due no later than 11:59 pm and must be submitted here as PDFs.

 

Poster Details

  • The poster should be in PDF format and should include a CIRES logo. (You can download one here.)
  • As for dimensions (since the event is online) we have more flexibility this year. Standard format is 48” x 36”, but you can choose whatever you want.
  • In addition to the poster itself, you will be able to enter a URL and a thumbnail image. Both of these are optional.
  • The URL is a link to additional resources—for instance, you could do a Google doc with links to related research. The thumbnail will serve as a logo for your poster. If people click on it, they will see the whole poster. If you decide to do a thumbnail, the dimensions should be 400px x 175px and should not include the title. (We will type that in separately.)
  • You will automatically be assigned a poster slot during the poster session. Stay tuned for your time from the Rendezvous Committee. Please reserve the afternoon for discussing your poster and taking time to view all the posters.

 

If you have any questions, please contact the Rendezvous 2021 Planning Committee: 
Dawn UmplebyMeg Tilton, or Linda Pendergrass

 

For more information and important links/deadlines, refer to this page.

Date

Wednesday, April 28, 2021
2021 - 23:45

Host

  • CIRES
  • CMC

Audience

  • CIRES employees

Type

  • Other
2021-04-28
 
ESOC Virtual Coffee Hour

ESOC Virtual Coffee Hour

ESOC virtual coffee hour occurs weekly from 9-10am on Wednesdays. We will be meeting remotely on Zoom. Please email Claire Waugh (waughc@colorado.edu) for information.

ESOC researchers, post-docs and graduate students gather for conversation and to discuss research. Occasional guest speakers are invited to give short presentations on topics of interest.

Date

Wednesday, April 28, 2021
2021 - 09:00 to 10:00

Host

  • ESOC

Audience

  • CIRES employees
  • CU Boulder employees
  • NOAA employees
  • Science collaborators

Type

  • Meeting

contact

Claire Waugh; waughc@colorado.edu

Location

2021-04-28