Faculty Mentors

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Amanda Back

Dr. Back is a research scientist working in the Assimilation and Verification Innovation Division at NOAA’s Earth System Research Laboratories, where she studies the use of satellite observations for numerical weather prediction. Her current projects include investigating how satellite observations can be used to improve smoke distributions and storm representation in the Rapid Refresh analysis and forecasting systems.

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Daniel Bon

Daniel Bon completed his PhD in Atmospheric Chemistry in 2011 and the University of Colorado, Boulder and the NOAA ESRL Chemical Sciences Division, where his research focused on PTR-MS field measurements of volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere. Since 2011, Dr. Bon has worked for the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, Air Pollution Control Division and he is the Lead Investigator for the Colorado Air Monitoring Mobile Laboratory (CAMML), which he and his team designed and built in response to a recommendation from the 2014 Colorado Governor’s Oil and Gas Task Force. Dr. Bon is also a team member of the Oil and Gas Health Information and Response Program (OGHIR) at CDPHE and co-chair of the Western States Air Resources Council (WESTAR) Technical Committee. Before attending graduate school, he taught high school chemistry and physics for 5 years and also worked as a photographer, divemaster, research diver and environmental education instructor.

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Ilann Bourgeois

Ilann's current research focuses on the sources, transport, reactivity and air quality impact of nitrogen species (e.g., NOx, HNO3, PAN, HONO) and ozone (O3). Nitrogen oxides (NOx) are principally emitted by combustion sources, both natural (wildfires) and anthropogenic (fuel combustion) and are primarily responsible together with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) for the formation of O3. O3 is a secondary air pollutant of particular concern for air quality in most major urban centres on Earth, and also for climate owing to its significant contribution to the global radiative balance.  

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Laurel Brigham

Laurel Brigham is an ecologist interested in how landscape-level heterogeneity, driven by microhabitats, influences plant community assembly. She is currently a PhD candidate in Dr. Katharine Suding's lab in the Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Department at the University of Colorado, Boulder conducting research at the Niwot Ridge Long Term Ecological Research station in the Front Range of CO.

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Sung Min Kim

Sung Min Kim is a PhD student in Civil Engineering with an emphasis on Civil Systems and a GAANN fellow for revitalizing U.S. infrastructure at CU Boulder. She graduated with the Bachelor of Science in Environmental Engineering from Cornell University in May 2019. She has had the opportunity to design water treatment plants, work on reservoir modeling through a collaborative NOAA research proposal on the Upper Colorado River Basin, and analyze NCAR’s Community Earth System Model 1 North American Monsoon simulation biases. Currently, she is doing power system optimization and energy market research.

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Peter Martin

I was born in San Diego, California but grew up in Gainesville, Florida. After graduating high school in 2010, I went to Wesleyan University for college. While I had originally planned to work towards a degree in chemistry, after taking Introduction to Planetary Geology, I changed directions and double majored in both Earth Science and Chemistry. My senior thesis focused on the potential for liquid brines at the Martian surface. I then moved to Los Angeles for graduate school at Caltech in 2014, where I worked on data being returned from the Curiosity rover. Having defended my PhD in December of 2019, I am now working as a postdoctoral scholar at the University of Colorado Boulder.

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Airy Peralta

Airy Peralta uses quantitative and geospatial science to assess the effects of the natural and anthropogenic disturbances in threatened wildlife populations. Her recent project focuses on understanding how the microclimate's processes of pika's habitat influence this species distribution to evaluate the implications of the ongoing human-aided climate change in the future distribution of the species.

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Lincoln Pitcher

I use satellite, aircraft and ground based remote sensing along with spatial data science and glaciohydrologic field methods to study ice sheet and hydrologic dynamics in terrestrial and cryospheric Polar regions.

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Chris Ray

Research Associate, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; INSTAAR/Niwot LTER

Chris Ray studies and models the dynamics of plant and animal populations, focusing especially on threatened species with fragmented populations. Her long-term project involves research on the American pika, aimed at understanding climatic influences on pre-historic and recent local extinctions of this species throughout western North America.

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Michael Rush

Michael (Mickey) Rush is a dynamic leader, hydrologic modeler, writer, and educator. He brings a balance of computational expertise, field research experience, and leadership skills to projects related to water resources science and management. His Ph.D thesis research uses coupled thermo-hydrologic modeling to understand how changing mountain snowpacks may contribute to changes in seasonally frozen ground formation, and to what extent such frozen soils shift the timing and magnitude of subsurface flow. Through his research, he strives to engage local communities, serve the needs of stakeholders, and effectively communicate technical information in English and Spanish to non-scientific audiences.

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Richard Saltus

Richard works with the NOAA GEOMAG team on an update to the EMAG2 global magnetic anomaly compilation.  The goal is to improve the resolution and reliability of the compilation to improve its applicability to geologic and tectonic interpretation.

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Neesha Schenpf

Neesha Schnepf and her geomagnetism research group works with space-based, airborne, marine, and in-situ magnetic field observatories to study changes in Earth’s magnetic field on a minute, hourly, daily, and yearly time frame. The primary application of this research is to improve navigation accuracy for land, sea, and airborne modes of transportation, to enhance satellite orientation, and to explore natural resources.

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Warren Sconiers

As an undergraduate at UC Irvine, I took biology courses completed research that helped me realize how the tiny world of insects and plants influences so much around us, which led me to earn my Ph.D. in entomology at Texas A&M University. Here as an Insect Ecologist, I learned how bugs, plants, and their ecology work, as well as taught undergraduates about these interactions. It was here that I began to greatly enjoy teaching and looked forward to teaching more students about insects and ecology.

In 2016, I joined the University of the Ozarks where I continue to teach as well as research insect and plant interactions. This university provides a student-centered environment where I can get to know my students, learn their interests, and best help them succeed. 

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Tasha Snow

Tasha’s research interests include high latitude ocean, cryosphere, and climate change. Her PhD research focuses on satellite remote sensing of ice sheets and ice sheet-ocean interactions. Tasha is a veteran of the US Navy.

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Jilmarie Stephens

Jilmarie received her Masters in Atmospheric Science from the University of California, Davis followed by her PhD in Soil Science from the University of British Columbia, Vancouver.  Her research interests fall under the categories of biometeorology or micrometeorology. More specifically her work involves carbon and water fluxes, turbulence, greenhouse gas emissions, and physiological modeling. 

 

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Stefan Tulich

I am a Research Scientist III employed by CU/CIRES and working off-campus in the NOAA Physical Sciences Laboratory. I received my BS in physics from the Univ. of Miami and my PhD in Atmospheric Science from Colorado State University. My research involves using observations and numerical models to improve understanding and prediction of large-scale tropical weather systems and their interactions with the extratropics. I live in Longmont with my partner and two kids, ages 12 and 10. If I'm not working, I'm usually out for a bike ride.

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