Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado Boulder



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Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Impact of relative humidity on reactive uptake of glyoxal (CHOCHO) onto aerosol over the Korean peninsula during the KORUS-AQ 2016 by Dongwook Kim,
ANYL 1st year, CU Boulder

"Glyoxal (CHOCHO) plays an important role in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation through aqueous phase chemistry. However, the heterogeneous processes and resulting glyoxal contribution to total SOA in various ambient conditions are largely unknown. In this study, the impact of humidity and irradiation on uptake of gaseous glyoxal onto particulate matter in has been investigated based on the glyoxal measurement acquired from airborne Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectrometer (CEAS), during KORUS-AQ field campaign, with the help of 0-dimensional box model where the parameters were constrained by the observations from DC-8. The reactive uptake coefficient of glyoxal (γ) was derived by reconciling the gap between the observation of glyoxal and the expected abundance of glyoxal estimated from the steady-state box model without the uptake process. In the presence of > 0.1 ppb of glyoxal, the OA growth rate from glyoxal uptake was estimated to be 0.48 μg/m3/hour and γ varied from 0-20x10-3 having median and mean values of 5.89x10-3 and 8.10x10-3, respectively. The typical lifetime of glyoxal during the campaign was estimated to be ~37 minutes. γ decreased at 25-35% RH range which can be explained partially by the salting-in effect. On the other hand, γ increased at 35-75% RH range which remains uncertain. Also, γ showed an increasing trend with increasing irradiation indicating that the irreversible uptake process is dominant at the highly irradiated conditions."

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The Synthesis of Two Novel p-38α Inhibitors by Hannah Maben,
ANYL 1st year, CU Boulder

"Current p-38α inhibitors are in clinical trials to treat diseases such as cancer, Rheumatoid arthritis, and Crohn’s disease. The synthesis of two potential p-38α inhibitors, bis-1,3-(4,6-difluoro-4-{4-[quinoxalin-2- ylmethoxy]methyl}-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl]pyridin-2-yl) 5-methyl-6-phenylpiperazine-2,3-dicarbonitrile (I) and 2,6-di(5,6-Dimethyl-6,7-dihydro-5H-[1,2,5]oxadiazolo[3,4-b]pyrazin-4-yl)-3,5-difluoro-4-(4-phenyl- [1,2,3]triazol-1-yl)-pyridine (II) were conducted. The syntheses involved several nucleophilic aromatic substitution (S N Ar) reactions, a Sharpless “click” reaction, and a mild reduction via sodium borohydride. All products and intermediates were sent for elemental and biological testing, and two intermediates were determined to have biological activity against colon cancer."

date

Monday, November 4, 2019
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

Ekeley S274

contact

Anne.Handschy@Colorado.EDU
2019-11-04
 
 
NSIDC CPP Seminar: Iceberg Calving

NSIDC CPP Seminar: Iceberg Calving

The influence of granular ice mélange on iceberg calving by Ryan Cassotto, Post-doctoral Researcher at CIRES

Abstract: Ice mélange is an agglomeration of icebergs and sea ice found in many proglacial fjords. Ice mélange variations are hypothesized to trigger rapid tidewater glacier retreat; however, a lack of observations limits our understanding of ice mélange evolution. Deploying instruments on floating ice mélange is inherently dangerous and mélange turnover often exceeds temporal sampling by satellites. Consequently, studies have focused on wintertime conditions of quasi-ice shelf ice mélange and the interstitial sea ice that bolsters it, while few studies have investigated summer mélange conditions. Here, I provide an overview of winter ice mélange studies and then present the first known evidence of a late summer, granular ice mélange affecting iceberg calving in a Greenland fjord. We used high resolution terrestrial radar interferometry to monitor mélange speeds and strain rates before, during, and after calving. We find the granular ice mélange experienced increases in speed, a loss of coherent flow, and a breakdown in iceberg-iceberg contact prior to calving. Our results directly implicate granular ice mélange in the calving dynamics of tidewater glaciers and further demonstrates the potential for real-time detection of failure in geophysical granular materials.

date

Wednesday, November 6, 2019
11:00am to 12:00pm
MST

location

Room 155, Research Lab #2

Event Type

NSIDC

contact

Mistia Zuckerman

2019-11-06
 
CSTPR Noontime Seminar

CSTPR Noontime Seminar

Living at the Intersection of Climate Science and Action

by Jane Zelikova, Co-founder, 500 Women Scientists 

Tamara Jane Zelikova is an ecosystem ecologist, filmmaker, and activist. She earned her PhD from the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at University of Colorado, Boulder. She is the co-founder of the non-profit organization, 500 Women Scientists.

date

Wednesday, November 6, 2019
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

CSTPR Conference Room

Event Type

CSTPR

resources

2019-11-06
 
 
 
 
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Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Ozone Production in Los Angeles: Investigating Spatial Differences in the Impacts of NOx Emission Control by Margarita Reza,
ANYL 1st year, CU Boulder

Los Angeles has historically experienced the highest ozone in the U.S. Strategies to reduce high ozone have included reduction of emissions of both nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOC), the two main precursors to ozone. Observations of ozone on weekdays and weekends, as well as from many intensive atmospheric experiments in LA, have indicated that for decades ozone production chemistry in LA has remained sensitive to VOC rather than NOx. However, very recent literature has suggested that LA ozone chemistry may be transitioning to a chemical regime that is sensitive to NOx, which would mean that LA air quality is positioned to benefit from NOx emission control on diesel truck traffic that are currently in the implementation phase. This study investigates this possible chemical- regime transition by first looking at the temporal trends in NOx concentrations at nine monitoring stations throughout LA. Spatial variability is found in the observed rate of decrease of NOx, suggesting that ozone has been affected differently throughout the LA basin. To investigate this potential spatial variability in the impacts of NOx changes, and, potentially, the change in ozone chemistry sensitivity to NOx, data gathered from the Geostationary Trace Gas and Aerosol Sensor Optimization (GeoTASO) airborne instrument on board the NASA UC12-B King Air on June 26th and 27th , 2017 was used. An analytical model was used to simulate ozone production in LA to identify the sensitivity of ozone production to NOx. Understanding the dependence of ozone production on NOx is critical for developing effective control strategies in this area.

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Nanopore Sensing for Single-Molecule Glycomics by Melissa Morris,
ANYL 1st year, CU Boulder

Single-molecule sensing represents the ultimate in chemical sensitivity, but is tremendously challenging to achieve. Because imaging at the nanoscale is difficult and expensive, developing techniques to measure single molecules requires ingenuity, and often relies on the interpretation of electrical signals. So how do nanopores help us measure at the single-molecule level? A nanopore is simply a nano-sized hole in a membrane or material. In the early stages of nanopore science, biological nanopores were isolated from nature, and now the field has turned to solid state nanopores. The Dwyer research group uses an electric field to create solid state nanopores in silicon nitride (SiNx) membranes, using a technique adopted from Vincent Tabard-Cossa.[1] Once the SiNx membrane has a hole, we mount it in a holder, so that it sits between two wells of electrolyte. We then monitor the electrical current to detect single molecules as they pass through the nanopore. In this study, we explored how solid state nanopores can be used to detect and characterize sugar molecules. Sugars have complex branching structures, and significant molecule to molecule variability. However, sugars are easily absorbed by the body, and their potential to be used as a new drug delivery system depends on their characterization.

[1] Kwok, H., Briggs, K., Tabard-Cossa, V. Nanopore Fabrication by Controlled Dielectric Breakdown. PLOS ONE. 2014, 9, e92880.

 

To provide anonymous feedback to the student speakers after the seminar (students only), go to: https://tinyurl.com/ANYL-Feedback

date

Monday, November 11, 2019
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

Ekeley S274

contact

Anne.Handschy@Colorado.EDU
2019-11-11
 
CIRES Members Council Meeting November

CIRES Members Council Meeting November

All CIRES Members are invited to join the monthly meeting of CIRES Members Council (CMC). CMC will be meeting to discuss ideas, issues, concerns and questions related to working at CIRES and CU. For more details, email CMC Chair, Alessandro Franchin, at alessandro.franchin@noaa.gov or see the CMC website

date

Tuesday, November 12, 2019
12:00pm

location

DSRC Room GB124

resources

contact

alessandro.franchin@noaa.gov
2019-11-12
 
NSIDC Cryosphere Seminar

NSIDC Cryosphere Seminar

Taking science outside the bubble: Lessons and opportunities in science communication by Twila Moon, Research Scientist at NSIDC  

Cryospheric research delves into many topics of critical importance to society and decision makers, with examples ranging from sea level rise to snowpack, permafrost to infrastructure. But access to that information can be hampered by scientific jargon, paywalls, and a lack of cross-community connections. Through the Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH) Land Ice Action Team (LIAT), we have been involved in a variety of efforts to synthesize scientific information, get science into the hands of stakeholders, and make connections across new groups. The primary scientific focus has been land ice loss and related sea level rise. Because changes in sea level are critical for decision-makingat the local to state to national level, improving connections between scientists studying ice loss and sea level rise and the stakeholders tasked with planning for sea level rise is critical to ensuring that clear and timely information is shared in usable formats, and that iterative communications between groups is informing science research design and decision-making. Over the last ~5 years, the SEARCH LIAT has endeavored to create and strengthen scientist-stakeholder connections around land ice loss and sea level rise. Efforts have included writing short briefs on the state of scientific knowledge (called Arctic Answers), engaging with members of the United States Congress and their staff, attending and presenting at the National Adaptation Forum, writing science synthesis papers, acting as scientific experts within stakeholder expeditions, and creating a LIAT group that includes scientists and boundary organization representatives. Through these efforts, we have increased our knowledge on best practices and clarified challenges to building and solidifying scientist-stakeholder relationships. In sharing this knowledge, we hope to support new and stronger activities that link scientists and decision makers to increase success and efficiently move science to action.

 

Note: Paid parking for visitors is available behind Research Lab #2.  If parking is a concern or you work on CU's main campus and you would like to attend, please contact the NSIDC Message Center at 303-492-8028.  

date

Wednesday, November 13, 2019
11:00am to 12:00pm
MST

location

Room 155, Research Lab #2

Event Type

NSIDC

contact

Mistia Zuckerman

2019-11-13
 
Predatory Publishing Seminar

Predatory Publishing Seminar

RESCHEDULED: Predatory Publishing Seminar

with Trevor Riley, NOAA Central Library, and Stacy Bruss and Sue Visser, Boulder Labs Library

Are you a publishing scientist? Then join Trevor Riley from the NOAA Central Library and Stacy Bruss and Sue Visser from the Boulder Labs Library for a seminar on predatory publishing--and learn how to spot and avoid predatory publishers. 

 

Attend in person, or join from computer, tablet or smartphone via this link: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/262716821

 

date

Wednesday, November 13, 2019
11:00am to 12:00pm
Mountain

location

DSRC Room 2A305

Event Type

Seminar

resources

2019-11-13
 
CSTPR Noontime Seminar

CSTPR Noontime Seminar

Public Discussion: Policies on Climate and Environment

with Colorado Senator Kerry Donovan (D - Chaffee)

* Co-Hosted with the Benson Center for the Study of Western Civilization. Seating may be limited for this event.

Senator Kerry Donovan is a Colorado State Senator representing Senate District 5. She currently represents Chaffee, Delta, Eagle, Gunnison, Hinsdale, Lake and Pitkin counties.

date

Wednesday, November 13, 2019
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

CSTPR Conference Room

Event Type

CSTPR

resources

2019-11-13
 
IRP Poster Reception

IRP Poster Reception

Save the date for the CIRES’ Innovative Research Program (IRP) Poster Session and Reception on Thursday, November 14, in the CIRES Atrium, at 4:30pm. The reception will feature the research results of last year's IRP winners, listed below. Light refreshments and beverages will be served.
 
The IRP is an internal CIRES competition designed to stimulate a creative research environment within CIRES and to encourage synergy between disciplines and research colleagues. The program encourages novel, unconventional or fundamental research that might otherwise be difficult to fund. CIRES-wide competitions are conducted each year to foster an innovative research environment where risk taking is allowed and even encouraged.
 
2018 IRP Recipients:
 

  • Do people or forests emit more monoterpenes? Detection of monoterpene emissions from volatile chemical products in urban areas
    • Investigators: Carsten Warneke, Brian McDonald, Matthew Coggon, Jessica Gilman
  • A Terrestrial Simulator of Wildfire Impacts on Watersheds across the western U.S.
    • Investigators: Ben Livneh, Fernando Rosario-Ortiz
  • CMOPS: an Optical Particle Sizer for Coarse Mode Aerosols
    • Investigators: Hagen Telg, Allison McComiskey
  • Innovative approach to investigation of gas and aerosol emissions and oxidation products from volatile chemical products, consumer products, and human activity in indoor environments
    • Investigators: Jose Jimenez
  • New insights into sea ice processes through innovative use of new passive microwave remote sensing approaches
    • Investigators: Walt Meier, Mary Jo Brodzik
  • Quantifying the impact of water storage changes on earthquake seismicity from integrated satellite geodesy
    • Investigators: Kristy Tiampo, Steve Nerem
  • Demonstration of high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) measurements of aerosols and clouds using a coherent Doppler wind lidar.
    • Investigators: Sunil Baidar, Alan Brewer, Paul Schroeder

date

Thursday, November 14, 2019
4:30pm to 6:00pm

location

CIRES Atrium

Amenities

Refreshments provided

2019-11-14
 
Maps of the Arctic Pop-up Exhibit

Maps of the Arctic Pop-up Exhibit

Maps of the Arctic Pop-up Exhibit 

Representatives of The Map Library (CU Libraries) will set up a Pop-Up exhibit of Arctic region maps on Thursday, November 14, from 4-6pm in the CIRES Atrium. The choice of the Arctic celebrates the MOSAiC Expedition, with its many CU Boulder participants. During the event—part of Geography Awareness Week—map librarians will be available to answer questions.

What: Maps of the Arctic Pop-up Exhibit - Geography Awareness Week Event
When: Thursday November 14th, from 4:00-6:00
Where: CIRES Atrium, during the IRP Poster Session

date

Thursday, November 14, 2019
4:00pm to 6:00pm
2019-11-14
 
 
 
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Can Humans & Nature Coexist?

Can Humans & Nature Coexist?

Boulder Faculty Climate Science and Education Committee Presents

DR. JAMES WHITE
University of Colorado Boulder
Dean of Arts & Sciences

Can Humans & Nature Coexist?
The Fundamental Challenges and Opportunities of Sustainability and Climate Change

Thursday, November 21
5:30-6:30 PM
Old Main Chapel, CU Boulder
Free and open to the public

date

Thursday, November 21, 2019
5:30pm to 6:30pm

location

Old Main Chapel

Event Type

CSTPR

resources

2019-11-21
 
 
 
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