Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado Boulder



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Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Recent Results and Upcoming Projects Investigating Aerosol Sources, Properties, Processes, and Fate by Jose Jimenez,
ANYL faculty, CU Boulder

"This fall ½ seminar provides an opportunity to introduce our group and its upcoming opportunities to the starting graduate student class, as well as to provide a summary of key results to the ANYL division as a whole. Our group’s research focuses on understanding the sources, properties, transformations, and sinks of submicron aerosols (and of the gases that interact with them), which have major effects on human health and climate.

In this talk I will briefly present results from different projects over the last year, especially those most relevant to incoming student opportunities. I will introduce our aircraft research program, where we are currently participating in the FIREX-AQ campaign sampling biomass burning smoke with the NASA DC8 aircraft. We are deploying an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) and, for the first time, an extractive electrospray (EESI) MS, with excellent results. I will also summarize results from the ATOM campaign, the first to sample the global remote troposphere systematically with vertical coverage. In particular global models are found to predict organic aerosols (OA) ok, but for a combination of wrong reasons as primary OA (POA) is greatly overestimated. On the other hand, models tend to predict pH which is substantially higher than the observations, with a pH ~ 0 being typical of the remote troposphere. A meta-analysis of large urban studies shows that urban secondary OA (SOA) leads to ~320,000 excess deaths per year globally, and should be the target of future regulations. The budget of organic carbon of indoor air is presented and compared to that of outdoor studies. Finally, fundamental measurements of the organic accommodation coefficient are presented using a new chamber technique.

Potential opportunities in our group involve the CalNexT campaign studying urban SOA in Los Angeles, studies of indoor air chemistry and surface interactions, analysis of aircraft campaign data and participation in future campaigns, and chamber experiments targeting both fundamental processes and signatures of urban SOA sources. Modeling tools such as KinSim and GECKO-A can be applied to the different problems as needed."

and

Atmospheric nanoaerosols: An instrument for chemical analysis of freshly nucleated particles and their formation from biogenic organic precursors by Andrea Wagner,
ANYL Postdoctoral Researcher, CU Boulder, Volkamer Group

"A large fraction of atmospheric aerosol particles are formed via new particle formation from the gas phase. But the chemical analysis of freshly nucleated particles smaller than 30 nm is challenging due to their tiny mass. In this talk I present a new instrument that, in combination with a chemical ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer, analyzes these nucleation mode particles. The measurements are size-resolved and parallel to gas-phase analysis. Additionally, mechanisms for the formation of particles from purely biogenic organic precursors in chamber measurements are presented."
 

date

Monday, September 9, 2019
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

Ekeley S274

contact

Anne.Handschy@Colorado.EDU
2019-09-09
 
CIRES Members Council Meeting

CIRES Members Council Meeting

The CIRES Members Council will be meeting to discuss ideas, issues, concerns and questions related to working at CIRES and CU.   All CIRES employees are welcome to attend and propose discussion items.  Please note that lunch is not provided, but we will eat together starting at noon in the meeting room of The Taj Indian Restaurant.  For more details, email CMC Chair, Mistia Zuckerman at mistia.zuckerman@colorado.edu.  

Information about the CMC and division representatives can be found on CMC's website https://cires.colorado.edu/about/institutional-programs/cires-members-council

 

 

date

Monday, September 9, 2019
12:00pm to 2:00pm
MST

location

The Taj 2630 Baseline Rd.

resources

contact

Mistia Zuckerman

2019-09-09
 
 
CSTPR Noontime Seminar

CSTPR Noontime Seminar

The Climate Change Story: Bridging the Gap Between Science and the Public 

by Bernadette Woods Placky, Climate Matters Director

Climate change poses arguably the biggest threat to humanity—the people, places, and things that we love. Even though public understanding and concern about the seriousness of the issue is slowly growing, there is still a significant disconnect from the well-understood science. In this talk, we will explore Climate Central’s approach to narrowing the gap between scientific knowledge and public understanding, from lessons learned to the road ahead. In particular, we will focus on Climate Matters, a program that partners with TV meteorologists to inform communities around the U.S. about the local realities of a changing climate—what that means to their family, friends, and ways of life. 

Bernadette Woods Placky is an Emmy Award winning meteorologist and director of Climate Central's Climate Matters program. In her role, Bernadette works with fellow meteorologists from across the country, providing resources and data on the connection between climate change and weather.

Before coming to Climate Central, Bernadette spent 10 years as a TV weather forecaster. Her most recent station was WJZ in Baltimore, where she earned an Emmy for Best Weathercaster.  Prior to that, she worked at both WLEX in Lexington, KY., and KNWA in Fayetteville, AR. Bernadette began her career at AccuWeather, Inc.

Bernadette is a proud Penn State University alumni where she is a steering committee member for MAPS (Meteorology Alumni of Penn State) and is a board member of Penn State's GEMS (Graduates of Earth and Mineral Science). She also carries both American Meteorological Society certifications — Television Seal of Approval and Certified Broadcast Meteorologist -- and is a member of numerous AMS committees (including Applied Climatology). Bernadette also serves on as a trustee at The Watershed Institute in central New Jersey. 

date

Wednesday, September 11, 2019
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

CSTPR Conference Room

Event Type

CSTPR

resources

2019-09-11
 
 
 
 
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Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Chemistry of Volatile Organic Compounds in the Atmosphere

by Joost de Gouw,
ANYL faculty, CU Boulder (1/2 seminar)

"Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are released from many different natural and man-made sources to the atmosphere. VOCs are removed by different oxidants on time scales of minutes to months with oxidized VOCs, ozone and fine particles as a result. These processes affect air quality and climate and are a challenge to understand due to the large number of different VOCs that are released to the atmosphere and the analytical difficulties in measuring all of these compounds as well as their oxidation products.

In our laboratory, we make measurements of VOCs by proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PTR-TOF) and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). PTR-TOF allows measurements of many different VOCs with high time resolution and without the need for pre-separation or sample treatment. GC-MS allows higher chemical detail, but at the cost of time resolution. We also combine these methods to better understand the compounds that are detected by PTR-TOF in different environments.

Several different ongoing and future projects will be presented in this seminar. First, we use PTR-TOF for measurements of VOCs in indoor environments. From the results we learn about the sources of VOCs from people, chemical products and building materials, the chemical transformations of these VOCs and other loss process such as surface uptake and ventilation to the atmosphere. Second, we are working on the emissions and chemistry of VOCs released from volatile chemical product (VCP) use to the atmosphere, which was recently discovered to be the dominant source of VOCs in urban air. In this research we make measurements of VOCs in urban air, separate the different emission sources and describe the chemical transformations of VOCs after emission. Finally, we are working on a chamber study to better understand the formation of secondary organic aerosol from biogenic VOCs."

and

Organic nitrogen chemistry: Recent results and future projects

by Eleanor Browne,
ANYL faculty, CU Boulder (1/2 seminar)

"Organic nitrogen is a ubiquitous atmospheric component that affects biogeochemistry, air quality, and climate. Assessing the impact of organic nitrogen on these processes remains challenging because traditional measurement techniques have lacked the sensitivity and chemical resolution to characterize the speciation and chemistry of organic nitrogen. Here, I will discuss measurements made with protonated ethanol cluster chemical ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry during the Holistic Interactions of Shallow Clouds, Aerosols, and Land-Ecosystems (HI-SCALE) campaign at the Southern Great Plains research station in Lamont, Oklahoma. As the site is located in an agricultural region, reduced nitrogen compounds are prevalent. I will present measurements of novel compounds including imines and urea and will discuss the sources and sinks of compounds at this site. Finally, I will discuss research opportunities in our group. These include further measurements at SGP in Spring 2020 and Fall 2021 as well as instrument development and chemical transport modeling."

 

date

Monday, September 16, 2019
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

Ekeley S274

contact

Anne.Handschy@Colorado.EDU
2019-09-16
 
 
CSTPR Noontime Seminar

CSTPR Noontime Seminar

Toxic Swaggers and the Case for Ecological Masculinities: A Talk about Men, Masculinities and Earth

by Paul Pulé, Science, Technology and Society, Chalmers University

Let's call a spade a spade. Business-as-usual is killing us and myriad other living things on Earth. In the recent book, Ecological Masculinities: Theoretical Foundations and Practical Guidance, Paul Pulé and Martin Hultman consider the compounding social and environmental consequences of Global Northern dominance, white supremacy, ethnocentrism, right-wing populism, climate change denial, homo/queer/trans-phobia, and misogyny. Drawing from critical studies on men and masculinities, deep ecology, ecological feminism, and care theory, they argue that these forms of violence are common expressions of masculine socialisations that are lacerating people and planet. At this talk, Paul Pulé will expose the toxic swagger of what Pulé and Hultman refer to as "industrial/breadwinner" masculinities. Pulé also notes the tepid social and ecological gains of "ecomodern" masculinities.He will then proceed to discuss a third path forward that they call "ecological masculinities." Ecological masculinities is an Earth-inspired response to the limits of our times. This new way of thinking about men and masculine socialisations points humans in the direction of broader, deeper and wider care for the "glocal commons." In this sense, ecological masculinities is relationally focused, draws from both personal and political perspectives, and guides humanity and the planet towards a deep green future.

Paul Pulé holds a PhD examining transitions from hegemonisation to ecologisation in modern Western men and masculinities. He is both activist and scholar, having more than 20 years of experience mentoring boys and men towards broader, deeper and wider caring masculinities while teaching on the subject at senior university levels as well. These days, he works primarily with cogendered groups both on and off campus in support of the caring masculinities in us all. He is currently post-doctoral research fellow at Science, Technology and Society at Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden and is co-author of a groundbreaking university textbook titled: Ecological Masculinities: Theoretical Foundations and Practical Guidance.

date

Wednesday, September 18, 2019
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

CSTPR Conference Room

Event Type

CSTPR

resources

2019-09-18
 
 
 
 
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CSTPR Noontime Seminar

CSTPR Noontime Seminar

Moving From Awareness to Action: A Co-produced Creative Climate Change Curriculum

by Patrick Chandler, Environmental Studies, University of Colorado Boulder
*2019 Winner of the Radford Byerly Award in Science and Technology Policy

Abstract: Increasing science literacy and finding innovative communication methods to bridge communication barriers that surround environmental issues is a vital step in making progress on climate change in our divided nation. This work cannot stop with awareness; we must provide pathways to action and support citizens in civic engagement. Combining art and science creates unique opportunities for doing this work. In this talk, Patrick Chandler will discuss recent art/science integration projects, methodologies, and community impact.

Patrick Chandler is a graduate student in the Environmental Studies Program at the University of Colorado, Boulder. His research is focused on the methodologies and impacts of combining art and science to communicate about environmental issues, and he hopes to publish a guide for communities and organizations on that subject. Patrick also works as an Education Consultant for the Washed Ashore Project and has ten years’ experience developing environmental education, stewardship, and science programs including curricula. Previously, Patrick served as the International Coastal Cleanup Coordinator for Alaska and was the Special Programs Coordinator for the Center for Alaskan Coastal Studies.

date

Wednesday, September 25, 2019
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

CSTPR Conference Room

Event Type

CSTPR

resources

2019-09-25
 
 
 
 
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