Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences



Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
26
27
28
29
30
31
1
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
 
 
 
Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

‘Water on ice at all three poles: tracking surface lakes in Greenland, Antarctica and the Himalaya” by CIRES Visiting Fellow Ian Willis

Surface lakes play an important role in the mass balance and hydrology of glaciers, ice sheets and ice shelves. It is also becoming increasingly apparent that they influence: i) the flow dynamics of the Greenland ice sheet, delivering large volumes of water to the bed when they drain by hydro-fracture, then allowing melt water to access the bed via fractures for the rest of the summer; ii) the potential stability of Antarctic ice shelves, via loading and unloading as they fill and drain, thereby initiating flexure and possible fracture; and iii) risks associated with flooding to mountain and downstream communities in High Mountain Asia. Here I discuss some of the recent work I have been involved with investigating the roles of surface lakes in a variety of settings, tracking their seasonal and longer term evolution and impacts from satellite imagery.

date

Wednesday, September 5, 2018
11:00am to 12:00pm

location

RL-2, Room 155

Event Type

NSIDC

contact

Mistia.Zuckerman@colorado.edu
2018-09-05
 
ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC Weekly Coffee

date

Wednesday, September 5, 2018
9:00am to 10:00am

location

ESOC Reading Room

contact

ashley.olson@colorado.edu
2018-09-05
 
FOSEP Discussion

FOSEP Discussion

Interested in Science Policy? Or want to know what science policy even is?

11th Floor of Gamow Tower, Duane Physics
University of Colorado Boulder

Join CSTPR and the Forum on Science Ethics and Policy for lunch and an informal discussion with the panelists:

Dr. Waleed Abdalati, Director of Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, Professor in Geography, Former Chief Scientist for NASA

Dr. Max Boykoff, Director of the Center for Science and Technology Policy Research, CIRES Fellow and Associate Professor of Environmental Studies

date

Wednesday, September 5, 2018
12:00pm to 1:30pm

location

11th Floor of Gamow Tower, Duane Physics

Event Type

CSTPR
2018-09-05
 
Distinguished Lecture Series: Dr. Katharine Hayhoe

Distinguished Lecture Series: Dr. Katharine Hayhoe

Title: “The challenges of communicating climate science in a politically polarized environment”

Abstract: It was my first year as an atmospheric science professor. We’d just moved to Lubbock, the second most conservative town in the United States. A colleague asked me to guest teach his undergraduate geology course while he was out of town.

The packed lecture hall was cavernous and dark. Many of the students were glued to their phones; others were slumped over, dozing as I began with the fundamental components of the climate system; I waded through the geologic climate record and ice core data; and I explained natural cycles and the role of carbon dioxide—both natural and human-produced—in controlling Earth’s climate.

I ended my lecture, as many professors do, with a hopeful invitation for any questions. One hand immediately shot up. I looked encouraging. He cleared his throat. And then, in a loud and belligerent tone, he stated: “You’re a Democrat, aren’t you? That was my baptism by fire into what has now become a fact of life across the entire country.

Thermometers give us the same answer, no matter how we vote. Over the last two decades, though, climate change has become one of the most politicized topics in the U.S. Today, the best predictor of whether someone accepts the findings of climate science is simply where they fall on the political spectrum.

How can we effectively communicate in such a difficult environment? I’ve found that it is often possible to move forward by recognizing and addressing the real barriers, which are more related to tribalism, identity, and solution aversion than to a scarcity of data and facts.

In this seminar, I’ll share the framework I use and some practical examples of how to bypass much of the “he said-she said” stalemate in climate outreach and communication, transitioning instead towards positive action based on a foundation of shared values and concerns.

Biography: Katharine Hayhoe is an atmospheric scientist whose research focuses on developing and applying high-resolution climate projections to understand what climate change means for people and the natural environment. She is a professor and director of the Climate Science Center at Texas Tech University, and has a B.Sc. in Physics from the University of Toronto and an M.S. and Ph.D. in Atmospheric Science from the University of Illinois. Katharine has served as a lead author for the Second and Third U.S. National Climate Assessments, and has conducted climate impact assessments for a broad cross-section of organizations, cities and regions, from Boston Logan Airport to the state of California. Her work has resulted in over 120 peer-reviewed publications that evaluate global climate model performance, develop and compare downscaling approaches, and quantify the impacts of climate change on cities, states, ecosystems, and sectors over the coming century. She has been named one of TIME's 100 Most Influential People and the Foreign Policy's 100 Leading Global Thinkers, as well as one of POLITICO’s 50 thinkers, doers, and visionaries transforming American politics and one of Fortune’s 50 World’s Greatest Leaders. Katharine has also received the National Center for Science Education’s Friend of the Planet award, the American Geophysical Union’s Climate Communication Prize, and the Sierra Club’s Distinguished Service award. Katharine is currently serving as lead author for the upcoming Fourth National Climate Assessment and producing the second season of her PBS Digital Studios short series, Global Weirding: Climate, Politics and Religion.

date

Thursday, September 6, 2018
4:00pm

location

CIRES Auditorium, Room 338

Event Type

DLS

resources

2018-09-06
 
 
 
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
 
Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Molecules to particles – Experiments and simulations relevant to new particle formation in the marine atmosphere by Henning Finkenzeller, CU Boulder, ANYL 4th year, Volkamer lab

"In this talk, I present my projects within the CLOUD consortium. CLOUD is an atmospheric simulation chamber at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland, to study the formation and growth of new particles in urban, rural, marine, and free tropospheric environments. In particular, iodic acid (HIO3) is thought to be a key precursor for new particle formation in the marine atmosphere, but the sources of HIO3 are currently unknown. Condensation of HIO3 is thought to be the primary mechanism by which iodine forms new particles at Mace Head, Ireland, and possibly other marine environments (Sipilä et al., 2016).

I have adapted the Volkamer group iodine chemistry box model to investigate known sources of HIO3 (e.g., OIO + OH) and inform missing formation pathways. In combination with theory, I have incorporated new gas-phase reactions into the model, and compared the predictions with CLOUD observations. As pre-requisite for modeling CLOUD experiments, I have developed the photolysis module (irradiation by different lamps), temperature and humidity control, the injection of precursor gases, dilution and losses to the wall. The experimental conditions (precursor and intermediate species concentrations) can be prescribed, or taken as those observed in the chamber.

I have further developed the Model for Acid Base Chemistry and Nanoparticle Growth (MABNAG) to represent reactive uptake due to Setschenow salting-in of glyoxal (CHOCHO). Glyoxal is a volatile, ubiquitous, and putatively simple gas that forms from the oxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons, isoprene, and also non-traditional precursors, e.g., fatty acids. Upon contact with wet and sulfate containing particles glyoxal-hydrate-sulfate complexes form that have extremely low volatility. I am examining the contributions to the later stages of particle growth, and am developing a glyoxal source for future experiments at CLOUD."

 

*Due to the closure of the campus Papa John's, lunch will be from Subway*

date

Monday, September 10, 2018
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

Ekeley S274

contact

Anne.Handschy@Colorado.EDU
2018-09-10
 
 
ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC Weekly Coffee

date

Wednesday, September 12, 2018
9:00am to 10:00am

location

ESOC Reading Room

contact

Ashley.Olson@colorado.edu
2018-09-12
 
 
 
 
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
 
NCAR Chemistry Seminar

NCAR Chemistry Seminar

A Tale of Two (Plus) Cities: Production, Sources, and Associated Deaths from Urban Secondary Organic Aerosol by Benjamin A. Nault, Department of Chemistry and CIRES University of Colorado, Boulder.

 

Abstract here: https://www2.acom.ucar.edu/sites/default/files/seminars/Seminar%20Announcement_Nault.pdf

Refreshments 3:15 p.m

NCAR Foothills Laboratory

3450 Mitchell Lane, Boulder, CO 80301

FL2-1001, small seminar room

Live webcast:

http://ucarconnect.ucar.edu/live

date

Monday, September 17, 2018
3:30pm to 4:30pm
2018-09-17
 
Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Photochemical and Dark Ageing of Organic Aerosols by Prof. Sergey Nizkorodov, Department of Chemistry, University of California, Irvine

"Atmospheric aerosols significantly affect air quality, visibility, and global climate. Organic compounds make up a significant, and often dominant, fraction of the atmospheric particulate matter. Primary organic aerosol is emitted in the atmosphere by various sources, and secondary organic aerosol is produced directly in the atmosphere as a result of a complex sequence of reactions that start with the oxidation of volatile organic compounds and end with the condensation of the low-volatility products into particles. What makes the representation of organic aerosols in climate and air quality models challenging is their astonishingly high degree of chemical complexity. Furthermore, the chemical composition of organic aerosols continuously changes as a result of various “ageing” processes, such as photolysis, hydrolysis, oligomerization, oxidation, and other reactions involving aerosol constituents and atmospheric gases. This presentation will examine the role of condensed-phase photochemical processes in the aerosol ageing, i.e., processes initiated by absorption of solar radiation by an organic compound within a particle or cloud/fog droplet. If time permits, we will also discuss “dark” ageing processes, which occur without any involvement of solar radiation and free radicals, and result in the formation of compounds with unusual properties, such as organic compounds capable of absorbing visible radiation (so called “brown carbon”)."

date

Monday, September 17, 2018
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

Ekeley S274

contact

Anne.Handschy@Colorado.EDU
2018-09-17
 
 
CSTPR Noontime Seminar

CSTPR Noontime Seminar

Private forest owners and climate change adaptation: How science and society will shape future forests
by Angela Boag, Environmental Studies Program, University of Colorado Boulder

This talk will be available via live webcast. To view the live webcast please go to Adobe Connect and login as a guest.

Angela Boag Widespread wildfires in western North America this year, last year, and indeed this past decade, demonstrate the real-time impacts of climate change. Unprecedented wildfires are also the result of decades of well-intentioned but counterproductive forest management and planning policies. Private forest owners now find themselves managing for increasing levels of risk. In this talk I explain how climate change impacts private forest owners in the West. My research asks how can private forest owners adapt to climate change, and how are they adapting now? In rural eastern Oregon, intentional climate change adaptation among forest owners is uncommon, though many individuals are adapting unintentionally. Forest management decisions are influenced by individual perceptions of risk, as well as local economic, social and regulatory factors, including regional wood product markets. Opportunities for enhancing the adaptive capacity of private forest owners include more resources for formal forest management planning, place-based education, and cooperative approaches among landowners. As forest management policies evolve at state and federal levels, management decisions on public lands will inevitably impact adaptive capacity on private lands.

Angela Boag is a PhD student at the University of Colorado Boulder investigating the relationships between private forest management and the changing environment in eastern Oregon.  She has a background in botany and also worked for community-based non-profit organizations before returning to graduate school.  Now a member of the Community and Forests in Oregon (CAFOR) research project, Angela's research focuses two questions: 1) What types of environmental change do forest owners perceive, and how do these perceptions influence forest management decisions? and 2) What adaptive actions are needed to promote sustainable relationships between people and forests as climate and forest disturbance patterns change?

date

Wednesday, September 19, 2018
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

CSTPR Conference Room

Event Type

CSTPR

resources

2018-09-19
 
Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Modelling the Annual Cycle of Antarctic Sea ice Extent by Marilyn Raphael, UCLA Department of Geography

Satellite-observed, total Antarctic sea ice extent (SIE) experiences a distinct annual cycle, peaking
in September and troughing in March on average. The amplitude and phase of the annual cycle
also varies regionally. What forces the observed annual cycle and its variations is not completely
understood. The annual cycle may be calculated by simply taking the average SIE for each day of
the year. However, while simple and transparent, this method produces a value that is subject to
substantial variation since it is based on fewer than 40 numbers, one for each year of observed
data. It also disguises the fact that the annual cycle might be slowly changing phase and that the
amplitude as well as shape of the daily extent might vary. Here, we present a model that allows the
mathematical and stochastic representation of the proximate forces that lead to the observed
annual cycle of sea ice extent. These mathematical and stochastic methods allow amplitude and
phase dilation and contraction. Thus, the annual cycle is not constrained to be a fixed cyclical
pattern rather, it is a pattern that allows both temporal dilation and contraction as well as amplitude
modulation. We use this model in an ensemble interpolation to reconstruct missing daily data in
the early part of the satellite- observed sea ice data set. Results are presented and discussed.

date

Wednesday, September 19, 2018
11:00am to 12:00pm

location

RL-2, Room 155

Event Type

NSIDC

contact

Mistia.Zuckerman@colorado.edu
2018-09-19
 
ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC Weekly Coffee

ESOC Reading Room

date

Wednesday, September 19, 2018
9:00am to 10:00am

location

ESOC Reading Room

contact

Ashley.Olson@colorado.edu
2018-09-19
 
Earth Lab Webinar, Jennifer Balch

Earth Lab Webinar, Jennifer Balch

“We bring fire with us: the role of people in changing modern U.S. fire regimes” by Jennifer Balch, Earth Lab Director

There are three ingredients needed for fire: fuel to burn, hot & dry conditions, and an ignition source. People are changing all three. The area burned has increased over just the past several decades, in western U.S. forests by 1500%. Last year was the most expensive wildfire season ever in the U.S., costing $18 Billion. We need to learn to live with fire, again. But how? Ultimately, we need to build better and burn better. In this webinar, Dr. Balch will explore these questions and answer questions from webinar participants.

The webinar will begin on Sep. 20, 2018 at 2:00 PM Eastern time; it will last for approximately 1 hour. A recording of the webinar will be available online within 10 days. Contact Remy Chappetta at rchappetta@nas.edu with any further questions.

This webinar is hosted by a collaboration of the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources and the Water Science and Technology Board of the U.S. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

 

The lecture will be at 2:00pm Eastern Time (12pm Mountain Time). The view the webinar, please register at: https://nasem.zoom.us/webinar/register/7515368512668/WN_Vf21gEfLRF-Q9sK9iV38uw.

date

Thursday, September 20, 2018
12:00pm to 1:00pm

contact

dawn.umpleby@colorado.edu
2018-09-20
 
 
 
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
 
Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Organic nitrogen chemistry: Recent results and future projects by Prof. Ellie Browne, ANYL faculty, CU Boulder

"Organic nitrogen is a ubiquitous atmospheric component typically accounting for between one-quarter and one- third of reactive nitrogen deposition. The chemical complexity and reactivity of organic nitrogen, however, has made it challenging to study. Consequently, little is known about the atmospheric processing of organic nitrogen and the resulting implications for biogeochemistry, air quality, and climate. Research in my group uses mass spectrometry to identify the organic nitrogen compounds present in the atmosphere and to investigate the atmospheric processing of these compounds. In this talk, I will discuss our recent work on organic nitrogen chemistry and describe new projects on aerosol measurement and chemical transport modeling."

and

Chemistry of Volatile Organic Compounds in the Atmosphere by Prof Joost de Gouw, ANYL faculty, CU Boulder

"Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are released from many different natural and man-made sources to the atmosphere. VOCs are removed by different oxidants on time scales of minutes to months with oxidized VOCs, ozone and fine particles as a result. These processes affect air quality and climate and are a challenge to understand due to the large number of different VOCs that are released to the atmosphere and the analytical difficulties in measuring all of these compounds as well as their oxidation products.

In our laboratory, we make measurements of VOCs by proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PTR-TOF) and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). PTR-TOF allows measurements of many different VOCs with high time resolution and without the need for pre-separation or sample treatment. GC-MS allows higher chemical detail, but at the cost of time resolution. We also combine these methods to better understand the compounds that are detected by PTR-TOF in different environments.

Several different ongoing and future projects will be presented in this seminar. First, we recently acquired a new Vocus PTR-TOF and are characterizing and preparing this instrument for measurements of indoor air in the CU Athletic Center. This will allow quantification of VOCs released from student athletes as well as during pre-game, indoor tail-gate parties. Second, we are working on the emissions and chemistry of VOCs released from volatile chemical product (VCP) use to the atmosphere, which was recently discovered to be the dominant source of VOCs in urban air. This research will involve the development of new analytical capabilities, field measurements in Boulder and in Los Angeles, and laboratory work to better understand the chemistry of VCPs. Finally, we are working on a chamber study to better understand the formation of secondary organic aerosol from biogenic VOCs."

date

Monday, September 24, 2018
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

Ekeley S274

contact

Anne.Handschy@Colorado.EDU
2018-09-24
 
 
Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Mapping debris-covered glaciers using multiple data sets in Google Earth Engine by Dr. Zhixing Ruan, Assistant professor at Institute of Remote Sensing and Digital Earth, Chinese Academy of Sciences

Abstract: Mountain glaciers have been regarded as an important indicator of climate change, and debris cover, through buffering the impact of temperature changes on glacier ice, can play a key role in regulating glacier ablation. Although numerous techniques for mapping of clean glaciers using remote sensing data have been devised, mapping of partially debris-covered glaciers still remains a bottleneck for the glacier inventory work. In our work, we utilized information from optical remote sensing imagery and digital elevation data based on Google Earth Engine, and introduced active contour algorithm into the automated approach for detecting boundaries of debris-covered glaciers in High Mountain Asia.  The utilization of Google Earth Engine and algorithm, and several case studies will be presented.

 

TO JOIN BY ZOOM:
From a computer: https://cuboulder.zoom.us/j/5409618610  
Or iPhone one-tap :
    US: +16465588656,,5409618610#  
Or Telephone:
    Dial(for higher quality, dial a number based on your current location): 
        US: +1 646 558 8656  
    Meeting ID: 540 961 8610
    International numbers available: https://zoom.us/u/MNl8z  

date

Wednesday, September 26, 2018
11:00am to 12:00pm
MST

location

NSIDC, RL-2, Room 155/153

Event Type

NSIDC

contact

Mistia Zuckerman

2018-09-26
 
 
 
 
30
1
2
3
4
5
6